Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 2, October 2015

October 29, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,240  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, we bring you some fascinating links from many areas of personality, including how there may be an unintended side effect of deep brain stimulation (used to treat Parkinson’s and other diseases): personality change. Also, the “Science of Relationships” website has a fascinating psychoanalysis of sorts of Elsa and Anna, the sisters from the movie “Frozen”, suggesting that their rocky relationship may have been due to differing attachment styles. Finally, Dan Ariely, who’s psychoeconomic research always makes us think, presents a short video on how to encourage motivation at work. And at this point in the semester, who couldn’t use a little more motivation? If you’re in need of a smile, then check out the monkey selfies found under our Favorite Link Revisited.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Anxious-Avoidant Duos: Walking on Thin Ice in Relationships and Physical Health

Writing for “Science of Relationships”, Jena Lempke describes how Disney’s hit movie “Frozen” depicts how varying preferences for closeness in people with different attachments styles can lead to relationship problems. She describes how the friction between the sisters Elsa (with her avoidant attachment style) and Anna (with her anxious attachment style) was caused by their different attachment styles.

3. Personality Changes After Deep Brain Stimulation

“Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a well-known and accepted treatment for neurological and psychiatric diseases. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), DBS clearly improves patients’ symptoms, functionality and quality of life in the long run. Nevertheless, it seems that the electrodes do not have motor-specific functions. DBS influences mental states and personality and in some cases it can even lead to a “new personality”” by increasing impulsivity. From “Brain Blogger”, October 29, 2015.

4. What Pushes Us To Work Hard — Even When We Don’t Have To?

“Behavioral economist Dan Ariely says we work hard not because we have to, but because we want to. He examines the intrinsic values we need to feel motivated to work” in this TED talk from NPR, October 2, 2015. (runs 14 minutes and 52 seconds)

5. Erich Fromm on the Art of Loving and What Is Keeping Us from Its Mastery

“There is hardly any activity, any enterprise, which is started with such tremendous hopes and expectations, and yet, which fails so regularly, as love.” Read about Erich Fromm’s book “The Art of Loving” in this essay by Maria Popova for “BrainPickings”, October 29, 2015.

6. This Personality Trait Predicts Your Tendency to Lie and Cheat

“Researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau in Germany say that a sixth personality trait,” called honesty-humility, “can predict one type of behavior that none” of the usual five-factors can: dishonesty. From “Business Insider”, June 15, 2015.

7. Tested: Whether You Can Change Your Personality At Will

According to research by Hudson and Fraley (2015) and published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”, “people may be able to change their self-reported personality traits through volitional means, and represent a first step toward understanding the processes that enable people to do so.” This summary from “PsyBlog”, June 16, 2015.

8. What the Textbooks Don’t Tell You About Psychology’s Most Famous Case Study

“If you turn to many of the leading introductory psychology textbooks (American ones, at least), you’ll find the wrong answer, or a misleading account. Richard Griggs, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Florida, has just analysed the content of 23 contemporary textbooks (either released or updated within the last couple of years), and he finds most of them contain distortions, omissions and inaccuracies” when it comes to describing the life of Phineas Gage. British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, June 30, 2015.

9. What Holocaust Survivors Can Teach Us About Gratitude

Neuroscientists have gained new insights into how gratitude operates in the brain. Glenn Fox and his colleagues had participants read testimonies of Holocaust survivors while their brains were being scanned. They discovered that areas activated during moments of gratitude include processing reward, fairness, moral cognition, and self-reference. Published in the journal “Frontiers in Psychology”, and summarized here for “PsyBlog”, October 21, 2015.

10. Should We Genetically Screen Four-Year-Olds?

Would true equality in education mean testing children’s genetics at the age of four, so that any learning difficulties revealed can be accommodated right from the start of primary education? Hear Robert Plomin on the role genetics play in children’s success. From “The Guardian”, July 17, 2015. (audio interview; runs 42 minutes and 46 seconds).

11. Only When I Laugh: The Science of Laughter

Laughter overrides our usual vocal and physical control to make sounds we never normally hear in any other context. Read all about this intriguing response in “The Guardian”, July 6, 2015.

12. Favorite Link Revisited: Monkey Selfie

Monkey Hijacks Photographer’s Camera and Shots Self-Portraits While filming macaque monkeys in an Indonesian national park, photographer David Slater lost his camera to one of his subjects. The resulting self-portraits are both comical and all too human and illustrate nicely the question of self-recognition as a uniquely human capacity.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 12, August 2015

August 12, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,202 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we have been continuing our summer housekeeping. We’ve been busy checking and updating each link on the site. To our dismay, we discovered that some links have disappeared entirely — especially videos (due to copyright infringements) and instructor’s class slides and web pages (probably due to retirement or changing jobs). This serves as a good reminder that any materials you use from the Internet may disappear or move so you should find a way to capture, print, copy, and/or download your favorites so that you can always have access to them.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Pixar’s “Inside Out” is a Surprisingly Accurate Look at Human Psychology —- Here’s What it Gets Right and Wrong.

Applies psychological theory and research to the movie “Inside Out” and describes what aspects of human psychology they got right (e.g., sleep consolidating memories, reframing memories, emotional complexity) what they got sort of right (e.g., core memories, personality islands) and what they just made up (e.g., imagination land). From “Business Insider”, June 23, 2015.

3. This Facial Expression Appears More Trustworthy To Others

According to research by Hehman, Flake, and Freeman (2015) in the “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here for PsyBlog, “A neutral face with a slightly upturned mouth and eyebrows makes people look more trustworthy, a new study finds. [But] the same neutral face with a slightly angry expression is seen as less trustworthy.”

4. This Fascinating TED Talk Shows Why You Have No Idea What Will Make You Happy in 10 Years

In his 2014 TED talk, Harvard social psychologist Daniel Gilbert explains “the end of history illusion” where “people are unable to anticipate just how much they’ll change in the future — even though they can appreciate how much they’ve grown in the past. So, at every age, you think the person you are today is the person you’ll be for the rest of your life.” Runs 6 minutes, 50 seconds.

5. CHIPTS: Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services

CHIPTS maintains this extensive list of links to 203 questionnaires for practitioners and researchers, many of them related to personality including:
Sub-Categories: Attachment, Coping Strategies, Health Efficacy, Life Outcomes, Mental Health, Perceived Vulnerability/Susceptibility, Personal Traits, Quality of Life, Religious/Spiritual, Self-efficacy, Sexual Attitudes, Social and much, much more.

6. College Social Life Can Predict Well-Being at Midlife

It’s well known that being socially connected promotes a person’s overall and psychological health. A new study now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 — and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 — can benefit her well-being later in life.

7. Your Musical Tastes Reflect Your Thinking Style

A study by David Greenberg and colleagues published in PLOS ONE, shows that the way someone thinks – his or her cognitive style – is a better predictor of the songs they’ll like than is their personality type. From Discover Magazine, July 24, 2015.

8. Keeping Up That Positive Feeling: The Science of Savoring Emotions

Savoring a beautiful sunset and the positive emotions associated with it can contribute to improved well-being, according to research. But why and how are some people better than others in keeping the feeling alive? From Science Daily, July 21, 2015.

9. The Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS)

The PANAS is based upon research demonstrating that self-reported mood states can be effectively classified on two dimensions. Each PANAS scale comprises ten specific mood-related adjectives rated on five-point scales of frequency over a two-week period.

10. State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)

The STAI is a validated 20 item self report assessment device which includes separate measures of state and trait anxiety. Recommended for studying anxiety in research and clinical settings.

11. Global Attachment: Relationship Scales Questionnaire (RSQ)

The RSQ is a 30-item questionnaire requiring participants to rate, on a 7-point scale, the extent to which each statement describes their characteristic style in close relationships (1 = not at all like me, 7 = very much like me). Items are summed to create two subscales, corresponding to the dimensions of avoidance and anxiety. Developed by Griffin, D., & Bartholomew, K. (1994).

12. Janis Self-Esteem Scale

Jannis, I. L., & Field, P. B. (1959). The Jannis and Field personality questionnaire. In C. I. Hovland & I. L. Jannis (Eds), Personality and persuasibility (pp. 300). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

13. The Pros and Cons of Being a Night Owl Instead of a Morning Person

While some research has found that early birds tend to have more positive social traits, such as optimism, night owls may have their own distinct advantages as well. From “Business Insider”, June 23, 2015.

14. Sexual Attitudes

Links to 8 measures of sexual attitudes including attitudes towards abstinence, sexual risks scale, sexual self-concept questionnaire and more.

15. How To Measure Circadian Rhythms in Humans

From Wirz-Justice, A. (2007). How to measure circadian rhythms in humans. Medicographia, 29(1), 84-90. Provides an overview of the topic with vivid examples and graphics. Opens in PDF.

16. How to Stop Procrastinating in 2 Easy Steps

Describes the work of Katy Milkman on “temptation bundling” in which behaviors we should do but procrastinate on are bundled with activities we’re tempted to do. Together, people are better able to exert their self-control to do what must be done and procrastinate less.

17. Researchers Discovered a Psychological Trick That Will Help You Stop Procrastinating
http://www.businessinsider.com/psychological-trick-to-stop-procrastinating-2015-7

“Psychologists have figured out a ridiculously easy trick to combat your tendency to put things off: Break them up into smaller pieces. The idea is that you’ll get a thrill out of checking those individual items off your to-do list and, before you know it, you’ll have completed the whole project.” From “Business Insider”, July 8, 2015.

18. College Social Life Can Predict Well-being at Midlife

It’s well known that being socially connected promotes a person’s overall and psychological health. A new study now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 — and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 — can benefit her well-being later in life. From “ScienceDaily”, July 23, 2015.

19. Research Suggests There are 4 Types of Introverts — Find Out Which Best Describes You

According to new research, there are four different kinds of introversion: social, thinking, anxious, and restrained. From “Business Insider”, July 1, 2015.

20. Exploring Bioethics

The National Institutes of Health provide this Curriculum Supplement on Exploring Bioethics for grades 9-12: “Students use a new model for ethical inquiry to develop thoughtful positions on complex bioethical issues. The supplement’s six modules each contain three 45-minute class periods of lessons on a specific issue.” Includes modules on balancing individual and community claims, allocating scarce resources, weighing benefits and harms of genetic testing, research ethics, and human responsibilities toward animals.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: How to Search APA’s Research Databases

Anne Breitenbach, APA Publications & Databases, put together this primer describing the host of free teaching tools for psychology research that are perfect for undergraduate students, [including] video tutorials, training webinars and reference guides that will help students learn how to efficiently search scholarly research databases, [and] website materials, podcasts and topic guides that will help them explore psychology and human behavior.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 10, June 2015

June 21, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,161 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This big news this month is that Personality Pedagogy has a new look: photos! If you browse any of our pages, you will notice the content is there but the layout is more aesthetically pleasing, incorporating many photos and illustrations. Also, we are now a mobile friendly site, meaning that it is easier than ever to look up content on the fly when you away from your computer. We will continue updating and repairing broken links over the summer and in the process finding new sites to add as you can see by this packed newsletter.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Using OK Cupid to Teach Research Methods

Co-founder Christian Rudder talks about how OK Cupid collects and uses data. Their methods raise important questions about research including: “What are different kinds of social science data? How can/should we manipulate respondents to get it? What does it look like? How can it be used to answer questions? Or, how can we understand the important difference between having the data and doing an interpretation of it?”

3. Positive Reinforcement – The Big Bang Theory

Sheldon uses chocolate to shape Penny’s behavior. Later, Sheldon and Leonard have a discussion of conditioning, which, despite some misuse of terms, may still spark discussion in your class.

4. Nature v Nurture: Research Shows It’s Both

A meta-analysis of almost every twin study conducted from across the world shows that the average variation for human traits and diseases is 49% genetic and 51% due to environmental factors. This, according to research published in the journal Nature Genetics and summarized here. Published May 15, 2015.

5. On The California Shore, Sizing Up Female Marines’ Combat Readiness

The Pentagon has decreed that the Marines must open combat roles for women by 2016 unless they can show a good reason not to. The Marine Corps has teamed up with the University of Pittsburgh to scientifically measure skills, strength, and endurance in order to establish valid and reliable gender-neutral standards.

6. How 4th Grade Predicts Your Future

“A growing body of psychological research is revealing a few remarkable connections between our childhood experiences with peers and our lives in adulthood.” Read about personality coherence of adult personality in kids who were rejected, controversial, neglected, and accepted as fourth graders. From “Psychology Today”, June 2015.

7. James Randi Educational Foundation

“James Randi has an international reputation as a magician and escape artist, but today he is best known as the world’s most tireless investigator and demystifier of paranormal and pseudoscientific claims.” Towards this end, his website features educational modules on “How to Think About Dubious Claims”, “Astrology: Superstition or Science?”, “Do you have ESP?” and more.

8. A Key Researcher Says “Grit” isn’t Ready for High-Stakes Measures

Grit, the “ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal”, has been embraced by educators, the media. But according to researcher Angela Duckworth, “the enthusiasm is getting ahead of the science”. From NPR, May 13, 2015.

9. This Day in Jewish History: A Psychoanalyst Who Couldn’t Understand War is Born

“March 23, 1900 is the birthdate of the Jewish scholar and psychoanalyst Erich Fromm, who gave up the religious obligations of the Orthodox Judaism of his youth for the study of the psychology of love – and war, which, to his mind, made very little rational sense.” From “Haaretz”, March 23, 2015.

10. Allport

A whiteboard video animation on the life of Gordon Allport. Runs 2 minutes and 19 seconds.

11. Gordon Allport Wiki

Includes pages on Allport’s early life, trait theory, and his visit with Freud.

12. Social Psychology Then and Now

Writing for the APS Observer, Anthony G. Greenwald describes the life and work of Gordon Allport including his work related to attitudes, IAT, prejudice, values, and more. From January 2013.

13. A Profile of Aaron Beck

“PsychCentral” presents this brief profile of Aaron Beck.

14. The Doctor is IN

“The American Scholar” presents this overview of the life, work, and theories of Aaron Beck. Posted September 2009.

15. Whether You’re a Lark or a Night Owl, Your Sleeping Habits Say Volumes About Your Health.

A brief summary of the research on morning larks and night owls and how they differ in their disposition, breakfast habits, alarm clock use, vulnerability to jet lag, age, and more. From April 2013.

16. Centre For Personal Construct Psychology

The University of Hertfordshire maintains this site related to personal construct psychology (PCP). Features background information on PCP, George Kelly, the repertory grid, courses and services, literature and library, and more.

17. Kelly (1978): Confusion and the Clock

The last work of George Kelly where he discusses the idea of death. Originally published as Kelly, G.A. (1978) Confusion and the Clock In Fransella, F. (Ed.) Personal Construct Psychology. Academic Press.

18. Kelly (1969): The Threat of Aggression

Kelly, G. A. (1969). The threat of aggression. In B. Maher (Ed.), Clinical Psychology and Personality: The Selected Papers of George Kelly (pp. 281-288). London, UK: Wiley.

19. The Duckworth Lab

The research lab of Angela Duckworth at the University of Pennsylvania: “Our lab focuses on two traits that predict achievement: grit and self-control. Grit is the tendency to sustain interest in and effort toward very long-term goals (Duckworth et al., 2007). Self-control is the voluntary regulation of behavioral, emotional, and attentional impulses in the presence of momentarily gratifying temptations or diversions (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005; Duckworth & Steinberg, 2015).”

20. Favorite Link Revisited: The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook

The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook Mike Masnick discusses an “experiment” conducted by David Plotz of Slate magazine. Plotz noted that well-wishers responded automatically when they saw that a friend was having a birthday on Facebook.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 7, March 2015

April 8, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,131 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The big news in the world of personality psychology is the opening of the Viktor Frankl Museum in his former residence in Vienna, Austria. The museum features exhibits, classes, lectures, and events. Check out the link below!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Viktor Frankl Museum

Frankl’s former residence in Vienna, Austria is now home to the Worldwide Viktor Frankl Museum. The museum features exhibits, classes, lectures, and events and “in the course of learning about the development of a genius, visitors also gain insight into their own opportunities and personal potential.”

3. Most Good People Have the Same Basic Life Story

“Psychology research verifies that the stories we tell ourselves matter. A new study from Northwestern University shows that folks who fit the classic mold of “good people” — those who care about others while also having high well-being and mental health — have life stories that share remarkably similar narrative arcs” according to research by Dan Mcdams and Jen Guo and summarized here for “Business Insider”, March 13, 2015.

4. Parents Make Nasty Little Narcissists?

Check out this research “that implies the Earth may have a few less narcissistic, self-centered personalities populating it if parents ditch overvaluing their child’s super-awesomeness to prevent them from potentially growing up into pedestal loving, manipulative, selfie-obsessed, nasty little narcissists” according to research by Eddie Brummelman and colleagues and summarized here by Carla Clark for “Brain Blogger”, March 9, 2015.

5. Men or Women? No Surprise Which Gender is More Narcissistic

Men are more narcissistic than women, on average, according to a new study published in the journal “Psychological Bulletin” by Emily Grijalva and colleagues and summarized here by Jeremy Dean for “PsyBlog”, March 5, 2015.

6. New Work Schedule Could Cure Your “Social Jetlag”

“Many of us are walking around all the time in a fog caused by ‘social jetlag.’ That’s what happens when we lose sleep because our daily schedules don’t match our bodies’ natural rhythms. The condition can be a particular problem for shift workers, who work into the night or on a shifting schedule. Now, researchers report that sleep and workers’ wellbeing could be improved if schedules took workers’ biological clocks into account.” This, according to new research by Till Roenneberg and published in the journal “Current Biology” and summarized here for “Science Daily”, March 12, 2015.

7. All About Awe: Science Explores How Life’s Small Marvels Elevate Cognition and Emotion

“The truly awesome encounters in life don’t reside in the everyday but rather in the experiences we have that are somehow magnificent and powerful. As cutting-edge research in psychological science is beginning to show […] that awe, though mysterious, is an emotion we shouldn’t take for granted, as it may have surprisingly meaningful consequences for everyday behavior and even overall well-being.” From The “APS Observer”, Volume 28 (4), April 2015.

8. An Upbeat Emotion That’s Surprisingly Good for You

“A new study singles out one surprising emotion as a potent medicine: awe. And happily, awe seems to be much easier to come by than many might expect, even for the busy and stressed-out. This, according to research by Dacher Keltner and colleagues published in the journal “Emotion” and summarized here for the New York Times, March 26, 2015.

9. The Lifetime Effects of Self-Control in Childhood

“In following a cohort of individuals from birth to their late 30s, Terrie Moffitt and her colleagues found that children who scored low on a variety of self-control measures at age 3 were more likely as adults to have criminal records, addictions, welfare dependency, low financial savings, bad credit ratings, and health problems compared with those who scored high on self-control as toddlers.” Watch her keynote address at the inaugural International Convention of Psychological Science in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, March 13, 2015 in this video. Runs 49 minutes and 2 seconds.

10. Favorite Link Revisited: Viktor Frankl

e-Textbook From the electronic textbook created for undergraduate and graduate courses in Personality Theories by George Boeree of Shippensburg University.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 5, January 2015

January 24, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,111 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we just discovered CelebrityTypes.com a page which lets visitors take personality tests (e.g., Five Factors, Myers Briggs) and as part of the results, matches test takers to celebrities who allegedly have the same personality. I know this sounds suspect, but we recently had some fun and discovered something interesting. If you take the so-called “President Test” and answer, not as yourself, but as Barak Obama would, that is, if you purposely tried to answer so as to appear Emotionally Stable, Extroverted, Conscientious, and high in Openness (and moderately Agreeable), the page will give you a graph of your personality along with Obama’s — and here’s the really cool part — as rated by personality psychologists David Winter, Sam Gosling, Dan McAdams, and Samuel Barondes! We have always wondered about the trait scores of President Obama and this web page appears to provide an answer. We’re not making any claims about the reliability or validity of the tests on this page, but we’re pretty sure you’ll find something here to spark the interest of your students (if only to inspire their own critical thinking!).

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. New TOPSS Unit Lesson Plan: Personality

The APA Education Directorate and the Teachers of Psychology in the Secondary School (TOPSS) Committee are pleased to announce a new unit lesson plan on Personality written by Simine Vazire. The unit plan includes a content outline, classroom activities, critical thinking and discussion questions, references and suggested readings, and two appendices. The six lessons cover An Introduction to Personality, Assessment of Personality, Psychodynamic Theories of Personality, Trait and Social-Cognitive Theories of Personality, Humanistic Theories of Personality, and Personality: Culture, Work, and Health.

3. How Mindfulness Works

C. Nathan DeWall writing for the “APS Observer” on “Teaching Current Directions in Psychological Science” describes two exercises which illustrate how mindfulness works based on the research of J. David Creswell and Emily Lindsay (2014). Posted January 2015.

4. Talkin’ About Your Generation

Science examines how pivotal events and cultural trends shape individuals and entire birth cohorts in this article from the “APS Observer”, January 2015.

5. Nature or Nurture? The New Role of Epigenetics

In this lecture from August, 2014, Eastern Illinois University psychologist Jeffrey Stowell, PhD, discusses epigenetics, including a look at genetics and behavior and epigenetic mechanisms. From his APA Pre-Convention Workshop for Introductory Psychology Teachers. Runs 30 minutes, 24 seconds.

6. Celebrity Types

This page lists the 16 Myers-Briggs Types along with famous (and infamous) “celebrities” who exemplify each personality type. You can find your own type by taking their 44-item survey.

7. Is Jungian Typology Scientific?

The blog portion of CelebrityTypes.com takes up the question of whether the Jungian Typology is “scientific”. Here, they answer some of the criticisms of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

8. Freudian Personality Types Test

This 48-item test purports to measure the classic Freudian adult personality types of oral receptive, oral aggressive, anal expulsive, anal retentive, phallic aggressive, phallic compensative, classic hysteric, and rententive hysteric. Though little information is given about the test’s validity and reliability, the questions and results do illustrate Freud’s idea and may spark class discussion.

9. A Double Life

Psychologist Nancy Segal has spent her career studying what makes identical twins unique — and what the pairs can teach us about the role genes and environment play in shaping ourselves. From the APA “Monitor”, volume 46, number 1, January 2015.

10. Early Bird or Night Owl, Your Sleep Schedule Says a Lot About Your Personality

ASAP Science presents this animated graphic presentation on sleep patterns. “Early birds tend to display more positive social traits, such as being proactive and optimistic, and are less prone to depression or addictions to nicotine, alcohol, and food,” Mitchell Moffit, co-creator of the series, says in the video. “Night owls exhibit significantly less white matter [in their brains], and as a result, there are fewer pathways for feel-good hormones such as serotonin or dopamine to travel through, but it’s not all bad for the late-nighters. In fact, they tend to be much more creative, have been found to have higher cognitive abilities, and are known to be risk-takers.” Runs 3 minutes, 10 seconds.

11. Self-Esteem and Flirting

The “Science of Relationships” website presents this two part series on self-esteem and flirting. This first link is on how self-esteem affects how people flirt; this second one is on how self-esteem affects when people flirt.

12. Are American Becoming Less Secure?

The “Science of Relationships” website reports “In a recent meta-analysis, researchers combined data from 94 different samples, involving more than 25,000 American undergraduate students, collected between 1988 and 2011. In 1988, 49% of people said they had a secure attachment style (51% were insecure in one form or another). By 2011 there was a 7% decline in security, with 42% reporting that they were secure (vs. 58% insecure).” Posted December 2014.

13. Men and Women Process Emotion Differently

“Women rate emotional images as more emotionally stimulating than men do and are more likely to remember them. However, there are no gender-related differences in emotional appraisal as far as neutral images are concerned. These were the findings of a large-scale study that focused on determining the gender-dependent relationship between emotions, memory performance and brain activity” according to research published in January 2015 in the “Journal of Neuroscience” and summarized here by “Science Daily”.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: The Five Factor Model

Sanjay Srivastava at the University of Oregon compiled this helpful overview page of the Big Five and the various ways researchers measure them including links to many different on-line measures.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 3, November 2014

November 26, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,088 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Are you a morning person, like Maya Angelou, or more of a night owl, like Picasso or Mozart? Is New York really the city that never sleeps? There must be something about the shorter days, earlier darkness, and the ending of daylight savings time which is making people — or at least the news outlets — more aware of our circadian sleeping and waking cycles. We feature two interesting links this month: One on the daily rhythms of famous creative people and the other on the sleep-wake cycles of U.S. inhabitants featuring an interactive graphic of sleep times averaged over each county within every state.

As the Thanksgiving holiday approaches here in the US we are grateful for lots of things from good health to a continuous stream of interesting findings in personality psychology that we are happy to share with all of our readers!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. When Does A Consciousness Test Not Test for Consciousness?

Describes the classic Mirror Test and the controversy behind it, most notably from B. R. Skinner, and questions if the test really measures self-awareness or just good training. Includes a video of a pigeon undergoing the mirror test. By Chelsea Wald for the science blog “Nautilus”, November 24, 2014.

3. Debunking Myths About Sexual Fluidity

Researcher and relationships expert Dylan Selterman, of the “Science of Relationships” website explains what sexual fluidity is and clarifies some misconceptions and controversies around the concept including bisexuality, emotional bonding, sexual desire, and gender differences in fluidity. Posted November 2014.

4. What Were the Daily Routines of the Great Composers?

“Night owls or early birds – how did Mozart, Tchaikovsky and Richard Strauss structure their day? Their habits in composing, breakfast, socialising and exercise are plotted against those of other great minds in this look at the daily routines of famous creative people” by Kyle Macdonald for Classic FM radio. Posted November 2014.

5. Dance to the (Circadian) Rhythm

The consumer technology company “Jawbone” released data aggregated from its users tracking sleep and wake times by location. The result is a series of fascinating interactive graphs of bedtimes and total hours of night sleep by county within the United States. Some fascinating findings suggest that our circadian rhythms are more attuned to the sunrise and sunset than to what the clocks say. Posted November 2014.

6. The Long and the Short of It

New research suggests that stress takes a toll on us at the most basic level: our genes. Over time, telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of our chromosome what protects our genetic data become shorter and die, leading to a wide range of aging-related diseases including dementia, osteoporosis, diabetes, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. From the APS “Observer”, volume 27 (9), November 2014.

7. Why Self-Control and Grit Matter —- And Why It Pays to Know the Difference

C. Nathan DeWall, writing for the Teaching Current Directions in Psychological Science column in the APS “Observer”, presents this five-minute activity on the Duckworth and Gross (2014) study of Self-Control and Grit.

8. How Long Will You Live? Ask Your Friends

Joshua Jackson and colleagues discovered that peer estimates of personality are better predictors of health and longevity than are self-reports according to research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here by Wray Herbert for “The Huffington Post”, November 19, 2014.

9. Beyond the Purchase

From the website “We know that the effects of our spending choices often last beyond the place or moment of a purchase. Sometimes those effects are beneficial, leading to enjoyment, happy memories, or feelings of belongingness. At other times those effects may be financially or emotionally detrimental. We developed Beyond The Purchase to explore happiness and the quality of life, and the outcomes of different purchasing and money-management choices, as well as the motivations behind them.” Psychologist Ryan Howell and colleagues created this site to help people make more informed choices. The site features personality tests, research findings, and a special section for incorporating their ideas into your classroom including a demonstration and slides on the Big Five personality traits and teaching central tendency using the Big Five.

10.The Jung Page

From the website: “Begun in 1995 by Jungian analyst Don Williams, The Jung Page provides online educational resources for the Jungian community around the world. With the cooperation and generosity of analysts, academics, independent scholars and commentators, and the editors of several Jungian journals, The Jung Page provides a place to encounter innovative writers and to enter into a rich, ongoing conversation about psychology and culture.”

11. Favorite Link Revisited: 10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier

Grounded in research, these activities including practicing gratitude, controlling counter-factual thinking and others may be used to spark discussion or to introduce topics in stress, resilience, cognition, emotion, and positive psychology.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 2, October 2014

October 24, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,072 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you know that Walter Mischel doesn’t like marshmallows? At age 84 psychologist Walter Mischel published a new book “The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control” summarizing over 50 years of his research on delay of gratification and self-control. He and his book are featured all over the media, from a personal appearance on the Colbert Report to summaries of his work in various print and online publications. Check out our links to some of these items below to learn more about Mischel and his work.

Also, 75 years ago last month Sigmund Freud died as a refugee in London. “The New York Times” marked the occasion by reprinting the original 1939 obituary from the “International Herald Tribune”.

Finally, just in time for Halloween, science has figured out what causes teenagers to act like zombies in their morning classes and how to minimize the problem. It all has to do with the teenage body clock. Check out an article describing research on this phenomenon complete with a lesson plan including discussion questions for instructors and their zombies, er, students.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Walter Mischel on The Colbert Report

“The Colbert Report”, a popular late-night satirical television program, featured special guest psychologist Walter Mischel to discuss his new book on the marshmallow test. In this segment, Mischel performs the test on Colbert with hilarious results. Through it all, Mischel remains cool despite Colbert’s antics, summarizes the results of this classic research program, and even admits to not liking marshmallows! From September 25, 2014. The segment with Mischel starts at 15:23 and runs about 5 minutes.

3. Learning How to Exert Self-Control

Writer Pamela Druckerman interviews Walter Mischel on his famous research using the marshmallow test to study self-control. Mischel “explains that there are two warring parts of the brain: a hot part demanding immediate gratification (the limbic system), and a cool, goal-oriented part (the prefrontal cortex). The secret of self-control, he says, is to train the prefrontal cortex to kick in first.” From “The New York Times”, September 12, 2014.

4. The Struggles of a Psychologist Studying Self-Control

Psychologist and writer Maria Konnikova talks with Walter Mischel about his research using the marshmallow test to study self-control and delay of gratification. Here, she discusses strategies Mischel used to help himself quit smoking and eat healthier. “Self-control is like a muscle: the more you use it, the stronger it gets. Avoiding something tempting once will help you develop the ability to resist other temptations in the future.” From “The New Yorker”, October 9, 2014.

5. Developing Responsible and Autonomous Learners: A Key to Motivating Students

From the American Psychological Association (APA): “[T]eachers can apply a wealth of psychological research in their classrooms. Psychology’s insights can help teachers manage behavior problems, motivate students, assist struggling learners, handle stress and support talented youth.” In this module “Developing Responsible and Autonomous Learners: A Key to Motivating Students” (2014) psychologist Barbara McCombs describes how teachers can use findings from Self-Determination theory and developmental psychology to help create autonomous, self-regulated learners from kindergarten through high school and beyond.

6. Debriefed Stories: How to Conduct a Debriefing Discussion

According to trainer and games guru Sivasailam “Thiagi” Thiagarajan, “People don’t learn from experience. They learn from reflecting on their experience.” In this interactive story, he presents six questions for debriefing which facilitators can use to help participants reflect and learn from their experience. Very useful for teachers, trainers, facilitators, group leaders, and others who like to use experiential learning in their work. From the “Thiagi Gameletter”, October 2014.

7. Which Personality Traits Are Most Important to Employers?

Summarizes research by Paul R. Sackett and Philip T. Walmsley published in the journal “Perspectives in Psychological Science” (2014) which found that employers seek candidates who are high in conscientiousness and agreeableness and that these traits are related to success across a range of jobs.

8. The Link Between Your Spouse’s Personality And That Promotion You Just Got

It’s known that personality plays a role in professional success. However, research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here suggests that your spouse’s personality can greatly affect your career as well. From “The Huffington Post”, September 24, 2014.

9. Buy Experiences, Not Things

Research by Amit Kumar, Matthew Killingsworth and Tom Gilovich published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here for “The Atlantic” (2014) suggests that happiness comes from acquiring positive experiences, not material goods. In particular, both the anticipation of a positive experience and the reflecting back on a past experience makes people happier than anticipation of or the reflecting back on, a material good. From “The Atlantic”, October 7, 2014.

10. Don’t Worry, Be Happy

Psychologist and writer Maria Konnikova describes the link between expectations and outcomes for cynics and optimists, while incorporating research on locus of control, learned helplessness, depressive realism, perceived control, optimism, pessimism, self-fulfilling prophesies and more. From “The New Yorker”, June 18, 2014.

11. Famous Writers’ Sleep Habits vs. Literary Productivity, Visualized

Maria Popova, writing for “Brain Pickings”, wonders if there is a correlation between sleep habits and literary productivity. The results of her query led to this graphic illustrating the sleep cycle of 37 famous writers and their literary accomplishments. The result suggests that having a set routine is more important for productivity that whether one is a morning lark or a night owl. Posted December 2013.

12. How Entrepreneurs Can Develop Grit, The Most Important Trait Of Successful People

Writer Faisal Hoque describes about how entrepreneurs can build “Perseverance and passion for long-term goals”, called GRIT by psychologist Angela Duckworth, by developing the characteristics of gut, resiliency, inventiveness, tenacity, and trusting instincts in this piece published in “Business Insider”, October 8, 2014.

13. How To Go From Dreaming To Doing: 4 Steps To Motivation

Eric Barker, writing for his “Barking up the Wrong Tree” blog, describes the work of Gabriele Oettingen on the WOOP method to maintain motivation. According to Oettingen’s research, people who focus on Wish, Outcome, Obstacle, and Plan achieve their goals better than people without this strategy. Posted October 5, 2014.

14. 1939: Sigmund Freud, Psychoanalyst, Dies Refugee in England at 83

“Sigmund Freud, originator of psychoanalysis and considered by many as the greatest single influence on the thought of the twentieth century, died at his home in Hampstead, England, early yesterday morning at the age of eighty-three.” A reprint of the original 1939 obituary from the “International Herald Tribune”, September 23, 2014.

15. Happiness: 10 Fascinating New Psychology Studies Everyone Should Know

Reviews 10 recent psychological studies on happiness including findings from genetics, neuroscience, emotions, traits, and more. From “PsyBlog”, September 11, 2014.

16. Early School Starts Can Turn Teens Into “Zombies”

The body clock of teenagers shifts as they get older so that they end up being sleep deprived zombies in their early morning classes. “By the time [a teen] is 17 or 18, however, her body now naturally wants to stay up until 10:30 or 11 p.m. […] for biological reasons, the average teen just can’t go to sleep much before 11 p.m.” Also see the lesson plan which accompanies this article here [https://student.societyforscience.org/article/questions-early-start-times-make-teen-%E2%80%98zombies%E2%80%99]. Published by the “Society for Science and the Public”, September 11, 2014.

17. Internet Trolls Really Are Horrible People: Narcissistic, Machiavellian, Psychopathic, and Sadistic

Research by Erin E. Buckels, Paul D. Trapnell, and Delroy L. Paulhus published in the journal “Personality and Individual Differences” (2014) found that Internet trolls — people who intentionally incite discord in online communities — tended to have personality traits related to sadism, psychopathy and Machiavellianism.

18. Favorite Link Revisited: The Thiagi Group: The Source for Training Games and Interactive Experiential Strategies

Educator and simulation game guru Sivasailam (Thiagi) Thiagarajan of “Barnga” fame, maintains a web site with tons of ideas to get participants involved and playing with ideas. According to the website: “We Do Training. And we do it differently. We use games and activities that engage participants. We keep them interacting with each other and with the content. We design training faster, cheaper, and better with an irreverent process that eliminates unnecessary steps that don’t add value. Come play with us! We’ll have you laughing and learning.” Check out their many ideas and sign up for their monthly e-mail newsletter.