Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 5, January 2015

January 24, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,111 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we just discovered CelebrityTypes.com a page which lets visitors take personality tests (e.g., Five Factors, Myers Briggs) and as part of the results, matches test takers to celebrities who allegedly have the same personality. I know this sounds suspect, but we recently had some fun and discovered something interesting. If you take the so-called “President Test” and answer, not as yourself, but as Barak Obama would, that is, if you purposely tried to answer so as to appear Emotionally Stable, Extroverted, Conscientious, and high in Openness (and moderately Agreeable), the page will give you a graph of your personality along with Obama’s — and here’s the really cool part — as rated by personality psychologists David Winter, Sam Gosling, Dan McAdams, and Samuel Barondes! We have always wondered about the trait scores of President Obama and this web page appears to provide an answer. We’re not making any claims about the reliability or validity of the tests on this page, but we’re pretty sure you’ll find something here to spark the interest of your students (if only to inspire their own critical thinking!).

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. New TOPSS Unit Lesson Plan: Personality

The APA Education Directorate and the Teachers of Psychology in the Secondary School (TOPSS) Committee are pleased to announce a new unit lesson plan on Personality written by Simine Vazire. The unit plan includes a content outline, classroom activities, critical thinking and discussion questions, references and suggested readings, and two appendices. The six lessons cover An Introduction to Personality, Assessment of Personality, Psychodynamic Theories of Personality, Trait and Social-Cognitive Theories of Personality, Humanistic Theories of Personality, and Personality: Culture, Work, and Health.

3. How Mindfulness Works

C. Nathan DeWall writing for the “APS Observer” on “Teaching Current Directions in Psychological Science” describes two exercises which illustrate how mindfulness works based on the research of J. David Creswell and Emily Lindsay (2014). Posted January 2015.

4. Talkin’ About Your Generation

Science examines how pivotal events and cultural trends shape individuals and entire birth cohorts in this article from the “APS Observer”, January 2015.

5. Nature or Nurture? The New Role of Epigenetics

In this lecture from August, 2014, Eastern Illinois University psychologist Jeffrey Stowell, PhD, discusses epigenetics, including a look at genetics and behavior and epigenetic mechanisms. From his APA Pre-Convention Workshop for Introductory Psychology Teachers. Runs 30 minutes, 24 seconds.

6. Celebrity Types

This page lists the 16 Myers-Briggs Types along with famous (and infamous) “celebrities” who exemplify each personality type. You can find your own type by taking their 44-item survey.

7. Is Jungian Typology Scientific?

The blog portion of CelebrityTypes.com takes up the question of whether the Jungian Typology is “scientific”. Here, they answer some of the criticisms of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

8. Freudian Personality Types Test

This 48-item test purports to measure the classic Freudian adult personality types of oral receptive, oral aggressive, anal expulsive, anal retentive, phallic aggressive, phallic compensative, classic hysteric, and rententive hysteric. Though little information is given about the test’s validity and reliability, the questions and results do illustrate Freud’s idea and may spark class discussion.

9. A Double Life

Psychologist Nancy Segal has spent her career studying what makes identical twins unique — and what the pairs can teach us about the role genes and environment play in shaping ourselves. From the APA “Monitor”, volume 46, number 1, January 2015.

10. Early Bird or Night Owl, Your Sleep Schedule Says a Lot About Your Personality

ASAP Science presents this animated graphic presentation on sleep patterns. “Early birds tend to display more positive social traits, such as being proactive and optimistic, and are less prone to depression or addictions to nicotine, alcohol, and food,” Mitchell Moffit, co-creator of the series, says in the video. “Night owls exhibit significantly less white matter [in their brains], and as a result, there are fewer pathways for feel-good hormones such as serotonin or dopamine to travel through, but it’s not all bad for the late-nighters. In fact, they tend to be much more creative, have been found to have higher cognitive abilities, and are known to be risk-takers.” Runs 3 minutes, 10 seconds.

11. Self-Esteem and Flirting

The “Science of Relationships” website presents this two part series on self-esteem and flirting. This first link is on how self-esteem affects how people flirt; this second one is on how self-esteem affects when people flirt.

12. Are American Becoming Less Secure?

The “Science of Relationships” website reports “In a recent meta-analysis, researchers combined data from 94 different samples, involving more than 25,000 American undergraduate students, collected between 1988 and 2011. In 1988, 49% of people said they had a secure attachment style (51% were insecure in one form or another). By 2011 there was a 7% decline in security, with 42% reporting that they were secure (vs. 58% insecure).” Posted December 2014.

13. Men and Women Process Emotion Differently

“Women rate emotional images as more emotionally stimulating than men do and are more likely to remember them. However, there are no gender-related differences in emotional appraisal as far as neutral images are concerned. These were the findings of a large-scale study that focused on determining the gender-dependent relationship between emotions, memory performance and brain activity” according to research published in January 2015 in the “Journal of Neuroscience” and summarized here by “Science Daily”.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: The Five Factor Model

Sanjay Srivastava at the University of Oregon compiled this helpful overview page of the Big Five and the various ways researchers measure them including links to many different on-line measures.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 2, October 2014

October 24, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,072 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you know that Walter Mischel doesn’t like marshmallows? At age 84 psychologist Walter Mischel published a new book “The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control” summarizing over 50 years of his research on delay of gratification and self-control. He and his book are featured all over the media, from a personal appearance on the Colbert Report to summaries of his work in various print and online publications. Check out our links to some of these items below to learn more about Mischel and his work.

Also, 75 years ago last month Sigmund Freud died as a refugee in London. “The New York Times” marked the occasion by reprinting the original 1939 obituary from the “International Herald Tribune”.

Finally, just in time for Halloween, science has figured out what causes teenagers to act like zombies in their morning classes and how to minimize the problem. It all has to do with the teenage body clock. Check out an article describing research on this phenomenon complete with a lesson plan including discussion questions for instructors and their zombies, er, students.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Walter Mischel on The Colbert Report

“The Colbert Report”, a popular late-night satirical television program, featured special guest psychologist Walter Mischel to discuss his new book on the marshmallow test. In this segment, Mischel performs the test on Colbert with hilarious results. Through it all, Mischel remains cool despite Colbert’s antics, summarizes the results of this classic research program, and even admits to not liking marshmallows! From September 25, 2014. The segment with Mischel starts at 15:23 and runs about 5 minutes.

3. Learning How to Exert Self-Control

Writer Pamela Druckerman interviews Walter Mischel on his famous research using the marshmallow test to study self-control. Mischel “explains that there are two warring parts of the brain: a hot part demanding immediate gratification (the limbic system), and a cool, goal-oriented part (the prefrontal cortex). The secret of self-control, he says, is to train the prefrontal cortex to kick in first.” From “The New York Times”, September 12, 2014.

4. The Struggles of a Psychologist Studying Self-Control

Psychologist and writer Maria Konnikova talks with Walter Mischel about his research using the marshmallow test to study self-control and delay of gratification. Here, she discusses strategies Mischel used to help himself quit smoking and eat healthier. “Self-control is like a muscle: the more you use it, the stronger it gets. Avoiding something tempting once will help you develop the ability to resist other temptations in the future.” From “The New Yorker”, October 9, 2014.

5. Developing Responsible and Autonomous Learners: A Key to Motivating Students

From the American Psychological Association (APA): “[T]eachers can apply a wealth of psychological research in their classrooms. Psychology’s insights can help teachers manage behavior problems, motivate students, assist struggling learners, handle stress and support talented youth.” In this module “Developing Responsible and Autonomous Learners: A Key to Motivating Students” (2014) psychologist Barbara McCombs describes how teachers can use findings from Self-Determination theory and developmental psychology to help create autonomous, self-regulated learners from kindergarten through high school and beyond.

6. Debriefed Stories: How to Conduct a Debriefing Discussion

According to trainer and games guru Sivasailam “Thiagi” Thiagarajan, “People don’t learn from experience. They learn from reflecting on their experience.” In this interactive story, he presents six questions for debriefing which facilitators can use to help participants reflect and learn from their experience. Very useful for teachers, trainers, facilitators, group leaders, and others who like to use experiential learning in their work. From the “Thiagi Gameletter”, October 2014.

7. Which Personality Traits Are Most Important to Employers?

Summarizes research by Paul R. Sackett and Philip T. Walmsley published in the journal “Perspectives in Psychological Science” (2014) which found that employers seek candidates who are high in conscientiousness and agreeableness and that these traits are related to success across a range of jobs.

8. The Link Between Your Spouse’s Personality And That Promotion You Just Got

It’s known that personality plays a role in professional success. However, research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here suggests that your spouse’s personality can greatly affect your career as well. From “The Huffington Post”, September 24, 2014.

9. Buy Experiences, Not Things

Research by Amit Kumar, Matthew Killingsworth and Tom Gilovich published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here for “The Atlantic” (2014) suggests that happiness comes from acquiring positive experiences, not material goods. In particular, both the anticipation of a positive experience and the reflecting back on a past experience makes people happier than anticipation of or the reflecting back on, a material good. From “The Atlantic”, October 7, 2014.

10. Don’t Worry, Be Happy

Psychologist and writer Maria Konnikova describes the link between expectations and outcomes for cynics and optimists, while incorporating research on locus of control, learned helplessness, depressive realism, perceived control, optimism, pessimism, self-fulfilling prophesies and more. From “The New Yorker”, June 18, 2014.

11. Famous Writers’ Sleep Habits vs. Literary Productivity, Visualized

Maria Popova, writing for “Brain Pickings”, wonders if there is a correlation between sleep habits and literary productivity. The results of her query led to this graphic illustrating the sleep cycle of 37 famous writers and their literary accomplishments. The result suggests that having a set routine is more important for productivity that whether one is a morning lark or a night owl. Posted December 2013.

12. How Entrepreneurs Can Develop Grit, The Most Important Trait Of Successful People

Writer Faisal Hoque describes about how entrepreneurs can build “Perseverance and passion for long-term goals”, called GRIT by psychologist Angela Duckworth, by developing the characteristics of gut, resiliency, inventiveness, tenacity, and trusting instincts in this piece published in “Business Insider”, October 8, 2014.

13. How To Go From Dreaming To Doing: 4 Steps To Motivation

Eric Barker, writing for his “Barking up the Wrong Tree” blog, describes the work of Gabriele Oettingen on the WOOP method to maintain motivation. According to Oettingen’s research, people who focus on Wish, Outcome, Obstacle, and Plan achieve their goals better than people without this strategy. Posted October 5, 2014.

14. 1939: Sigmund Freud, Psychoanalyst, Dies Refugee in England at 83

“Sigmund Freud, originator of psychoanalysis and considered by many as the greatest single influence on the thought of the twentieth century, died at his home in Hampstead, England, early yesterday morning at the age of eighty-three.” A reprint of the original 1939 obituary from the “International Herald Tribune”, September 23, 2014.

15. Happiness: 10 Fascinating New Psychology Studies Everyone Should Know

Reviews 10 recent psychological studies on happiness including findings from genetics, neuroscience, emotions, traits, and more. From “PsyBlog”, September 11, 2014.

16. Early School Starts Can Turn Teens Into “Zombies”

The body clock of teenagers shifts as they get older so that they end up being sleep deprived zombies in their early morning classes. “By the time [a teen] is 17 or 18, however, her body now naturally wants to stay up until 10:30 or 11 p.m. […] for biological reasons, the average teen just can’t go to sleep much before 11 p.m.” Also see the lesson plan which accompanies this article here [https://student.societyforscience.org/article/questions-early-start-times-make-teen-%E2%80%98zombies%E2%80%99]. Published by the “Society for Science and the Public”, September 11, 2014.

17. Internet Trolls Really Are Horrible People: Narcissistic, Machiavellian, Psychopathic, and Sadistic

Research by Erin E. Buckels, Paul D. Trapnell, and Delroy L. Paulhus published in the journal “Personality and Individual Differences” (2014) found that Internet trolls — people who intentionally incite discord in online communities — tended to have personality traits related to sadism, psychopathy and Machiavellianism.

18. Favorite Link Revisited: The Thiagi Group: The Source for Training Games and Interactive Experiential Strategies

Educator and simulation game guru Sivasailam (Thiagi) Thiagarajan of “Barnga” fame, maintains a web site with tons of ideas to get participants involved and playing with ideas. According to the website: “We Do Training. And we do it differently. We use games and activities that engage participants. We keep them interacting with each other and with the content. We design training faster, cheaper, and better with an irreverent process that eliminates unnecessary steps that don’t add value. Come play with us! We’ll have you laughing and learning.” Check out their many ideas and sign up for their monthly e-mail newsletter.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 1, September 2014

September 11, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,061 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Like us, we’re sure many of you are in the full swing of a new semester and a new school year. We’ll keep this newsletter short and sweet so you can go back to preparing your classes.

Special thanks go out this month to Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania who put together a PowerPoint presentation to help students use flashcards more effectively as a study tool. Their presentation is based on (a) what psychologists know about concept formation and (b) what psychologist know about memory. You can download via the link below. We thank them for giving Personality Pedagogy the opportunity to publish their presentation. Check it out!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Beyond Rote Memorization: New Ways to Use Flashcards to Learn, Remember, and Understand Concepts

Students often use flashcards, but they often do not use them effectively. This Powerpoint, created by Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania, shows students how to make and study flashcards effectively. Instructors can use this Powerpoint as a presentation or they can assign it to students as a tutorial. If used as a tutorial, professors can have students print out a results page that will tell professors how long students spent on the tutorial and how well they did on a quiz over the tutorial. Requires PowerPoint 2010 or later and, when prompted, users should choose to enable macros.

3. Freud’s City, From Couch to Cafes

Stephen Heyman, writing for ‘’The New York Times’’ researched and visited many of Freud’s favorite haunts in a city which he both loved and hated. From the cafe where the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society met to Leopoldstadt, the Jewish quarter in Freud’s day, to a medical history museum and Schloss Bellevue where Freud interpreted his first dream, Heyman describes places in Vienna where one can go to appreciate the import and life of Sigmund Freud.

4. The Mistake Everybody Makes With Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence isn’t just “being nice to people” nor is it unequivocally a good thing. This info graphic vividly illustrates what emotional intelligence is . . . and isn’t. From ”Business Insider”, August 18, 2014.

5. What Your Facebook Photos Say About Your Personality

According to research by Azar Eftekhar and colleagues, extroverts and people high in Neuroticism upload significant numbers of photos. However Extroverts tend to change their profile cover photos while people high in Neuroticism upload more photos per album. From ‘’Live Science’’, August 5, 2014.

6. The Best Jobs For Every Personality Type

This info graphic presents the five best jobs for each type of personality according to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Personality Test. From ”Business Insider”, September 4, 2014.

7. Can Fiction Stories Make Us More Empathetic?

‘’Exposure to narrative fiction may improve our ability to understand what other people are thinking or feeling, a researcher reports. Many stories are about people — their mental states, their relationships. The researcher explains that we understand stories using basic cognitive functions, and there is not a special module in the brain that allows us to do this. Understanding stories is similar to the way we understand the real world.’’ From ‘’Science Daily’’, August 11, 2014.

8. 4 Tips For Becoming Emotionally Resilient

Emotional resilience can be learned and this article presents 4 ways to help develop it. From ‘’Psych Central’’, September 11, 2014.

9. Epigenetics: Genes, Environment and The Generation Game
According to this article from ‘’The Guardian’’, September 6, 2014, ‘’New research claims that environmental factors affect not just an individual’s genes but those of their offspring too. Diabetes, obesity – even certain phobias – may all be influenced by the behaviour of our forebears’’.

10. How Trauma Can Help You Grow

Post-traumatic growth can help help survivors of traumatic events cope with their pain and recover from traumatic events. From ‘’U.S. News & World Report’’, September 8, 2014.

11. Reacting to Personal Setbacks: Do You Bounce Back or Give Up?

‘’Sometimes when people get upsetting news – such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review – they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened’’ according to new research mapping brain activity using fMRI scans published in the journal ‘’Neuron’’ and summarized here in ‘’Science Daily’’, September 4, 3014.

12. Science Explains Why Comedies Are Funnier When You See Them in a Crowded Theater

Research published in the journal ‘’Emotion’’ suggests that group attention intensifies emotions relative to attending alone. From ‘’Discover Magazine’’, September 2, 2014.

13. Favorite Link Revisited: The Science of Compassion and Resilience

Psychologist David DeSteno examines the science of compassion and resilience exploring new ideas for leveraging the mechanisms of the mind that enable them according to Maria Popova for Brain Pickings, October 22, 2012. Runs 18 minutes, 28 seconds.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 12, August 2014

August 18, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,046 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month would be a good time to get moving on your upcoming fall classes. But if you are still in summer mode, then check out our links on procrastination below.

If, however, you are looking for inspiration for your classes including activities, textbooks, syllabi, and even ideas for first-day-of-class ice breakers, then check out The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, our featured Favorite Link Revisited this month brought to you by The Society for the Teaching of Psychology.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2.Getting Over Procrastination

Piers Steel, a researcher whose specialty is procrastination, explains how procrastination has been a problem since recorded time leading to lessened well-being, worse health, and lower salaries. So, why do we do it and how can we stop it? Steel shares some of his research findings in this piece by Maria Konnikova for “The New Yorker”, July 22, 2014.

3. Procrastination and Science

What do the Dalai Lama, Victor Hugo, St. Augstine and Margaret Atwood have in common? They are all procrastinators according to researchers Piers Steel, Rosa Hendijani and Chris Morin of the University of Calgary. They put together this web page to study procrastination and to link it to other aspects of personality. Includes links to the downside and the upside of procrastination, famous procrastinators, quotes about procrastination, personality tests, online polls, strategies to counter procrastination, and a summary of their latest research. Posted August 2014.

4. Procrastination Survey

You can sign up here to take the procrastination survey of researchers Piers Steel, Rosa Hendijani and Chris Morin of the University of Calgary and to participate in their ongoing research on procrastination.

5. Sometimes Early Birds Are Too Early

From the article: “Since the advent of the deadline, procrastinators have suffered society’s barbs for putting off until later what needs doing now. But it turns out that many people appear to be finishing things sooner than they need to get them done. They are “precrastinators,” researchers say. “ From “The New York Times”, July 19, 2014.

6. How Your “Locus of Control” Drives Your Success (and Stress)

Though generally people with an internal locus of control fare better in life, an extreme internal orientation can become a problem unless it is tempered by competence, self-efficacy, and opportunity or else people may become neurotic, anxious, and depressed. From “Business Insider”, July 30, 2014.

7. Mathematical Equation to Predict Happiness: Doesn’t Depend on How Well Things Go, But on Whether Things are Better Than Expected

“The happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide has been predicted by an equation developed by researchers at [University College, London], with results showing that moment-to-moment happiness reflects not just how well things are going, but whether things are going better.” From “ScienceDaily”, August 4, 2014.

8. Study Reveals “Unhappiest” Cities in the U.S.

“New research identifies the unhappiest cities in the U.S., but finds that some young people are still willing to relocate to them for a good job opportunity or lower housing prices. The analysis suggests people may be deciding to trade happiness for other gains.” From “ScienceDaily”, July 22, 2014.

9. How Much Does Happiness Cost in Your State?

According to ABC News “In a popular study by psychologist Daniel Kahneman and economist Angus Deaton, it was determined that the “magic income” is $75,000 a year. According to the study, as people earn more money, their day-to-day happiness (or “Emotional Well-Being”) rises.” They put together a map estimating how much it takes in each state to reach this idea level of income. In some states like Utah and Mississippi, it takes less, while in others, New York, Connecticut, and Hawaii, it takes much more. July 18, 2014.

10. How 14 Things That Happened To You In Childhood Shape You As An Adult

From attachment with caretakers to making one’s own decisions, to being spanked as a kid, there is evidence that these experiences from one’s childhood can affect personality in adulthood. From “Business Insider”, July 28, 2014.

11. Why Was Darth Vader So Evil? Blame His Lack of Parental Care, Say Psychologists

“Why was Darth Vader such a bad dude? According to a team of psychologists led by Peter Jonason, it’s down to his lack of parental care: the fact he was separated from his mother at age 9, and his father’s absence. The researchers believe such circumstances can catalyze the emergence of the Dark Triad of personality traits: Machiavellianism, Narcissism and Psychopathy. These traits are usually seen as negative, but Jonason and his colleagues believe they may be an adaptive response to tough early circumstances that signal to a child “life is bad”.” From “BPS Research Digest”, August 5, 2014.

12. How to Manage Both Extroverts and Introverts

Introverts and extroverts both bring assets to the workplace. Understanding what they are and how to manage them can help managers run a more productive and happy workplace. From “Business Insider”, July 10, 2014.

13. This Personality Trait Is The Most Important Driver Of Creative Achievement

According to research, the factor of Openness and its four constituent factors of explicit cognitive ability, intellectual engagement, affective engagement, and aesthetic engagement are related to creative work. From “Business Insider”, July 7, 2014.

14. One Simple Question Can Determine if You’re A Narcissist

According to Brad Bushman, “Narcissists aren’t afraid to tell you they’re narcissists” in this summary of his research here in “Business Insider”, August 6, 2014.

15. If Freud Worked Tech Support

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, produces a podcast about psychology called “The Psych Files”. In this episode (Episode 224) he presents a ”humorous way to learn about the Freudian defense mechanisms (actually elaborated by Anna Freud) of Displacement, Denial, Sublimation, Reaction Formation, and Projection. A little dream analysis thrown in. Who knows? Maybe Freud would have been good at tech support” (runs 4 minutes, and 8 seconds).

16. Favorite Link Revisited: The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) develops and distributes teaching and advising materials and provides services to teachers of psychology at all levels on behalf of The Society for the Teaching of Psychology. Look here for everything from copies of syllabi, how to write letters of recommendation, how to host an undergraduate research conference, to ethical issues and ice breakers with everything else in between.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 8, April 2014

April 30, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,982 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Where did this semester go? For the first two months many of us barely had a complete week without missing a class day and here it is, finals already! We’ll keep this month’s issue short, sweet and highly entertaining. But first, in honor of finals week at my school, a few thought questions for you: Is Vladimir Putin a Narcissist? How is psychological science like Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows? Can you use your French toast as a kind of Rorschach test? Read on to find out!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Self-Other Agreement in Personality judgements

Seth Kaplan, Alicia Stachowski and Jill Bradley-Geist describe a classroom activity in which students judge each other using the five factors. The exercise can be used to illustrate the five factors, personality testing, interpersonal judgement, and self-awareness, as well as serve as a lively ice breaker exercise.

3. Inspiring Short Video: What is it that you desire most?

This short video is actually an advertisement for a Thai Insurance Company. In it, a man is depicted going through his day where things keep going wrong and yet he cheerfully continues to help people around him: “What does he get in return for doing this every day? He gets nothing. He won’t be richer. He won’t appear on TV. Still anonymous. And not a bit more famous. What he does receive are emotions. He witness happiness. Reaches a deeper understanding. Feels the love. Receives what money can’t buy and a world made more beautiful.” Published on April 5, 2014. Runs 3 minutes, 5 seconds.

4. Guide Your Students to Become Better Research Consumers

In this article for the April 2014 APS “Observer” psychologist Beth Morling outlines four validities (external, internal, construct, statistical) which are easy to remember and can help students to more critically evaluate research.

5. The Deathly Hallows of Psychological Science

Personality psychologist Brent Roberts compares the proposed changes to improve psychological science — including the Open Science Framework, journal reporting practices, and new statistics — to the dilemma Harry Potter faces in the final book of the series “The Deathly Hallows”. The dilemma we face is whether to destroy the Horcrux by eliminating problematic practices or to continue in the path of least resistance by pursuing the Deathly Hallows. His vivid analogy and clear description of the problem make this a thought-provoking and challenging read for any psychological scientist. Posted March 2014.

6. Inside Social Modeling With Albert Bandura

The Association for Psychological Science presented this special edition of “Inside the Psychologist’s Studio” featuring an in-depth interview with Albert Bandura. Filmed August 26, 2013 at Stanford University, the video runs 46 minutes and 03 seconds.

7. Photos of Identical Twins As Grown-Ups Show How Fate Takes Its Course

Beijing-based photographer Gao Rongguo captured this series of photos of men and women — identical twins — over 50 years of age. These haunting images raise the question of how genetics and our experiences make us who we are. Posted March 2014.

8. IRBs and Research on Teaching and Learning (2014)

Ryan C. Martin, Regan A. R. Gurung, and Janie H. Wilson put together this resource for the Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP). This unit “addresses common questions researchers might have about seeking approval from Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) to conduct research on teaching and learning (often called the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; SoTL)”. It is available under the Ethics tab.

9. Vladimir Putin, Narcissist?

Writing for the “The Atlantic”, Joseph Burgo examines how the concept of narcissism might provide insight into the Russian leader. Published April 15, 2014.

10. 5 Surefire Signs Someone You Care About is A Narcissist

Writing for the “Huff Post” Sharon Greenthal describes these five signs: “Believing that you’re better than others; fantasizing about power, success and attractiveness; exaggerating your achievements or talents; expecting constant praise and admiration; and believing that you’re special and acting accordingly.” Published February 24, 2014.

11. French Toast Rorschach Test

This entertaining “test”  will help you to determine which type of French Toast you should order when you go to its sponsor, the restaurant chain Denny’s. The images are eerily reminiscent of actual Rorschach cards. A fun way to open a discussion on projective tests, test construction, validity and reliability, and more.

12. Myers & Dewall Talk Psych

“David Myers and Nathan DeWall enjoy connecting psychological science with everyday life. In Myers and DeWall Talk Psych they share exciting new findings, everyday applications, and observations on all things psychology.”

13. Study Reveals How Neurotic People View Action

According to new research by Molly E. Ireland, Justin Hepler,  Hong Li, and Dolores Albarracin published in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for “The Huffington Post” there is a relationship between Neuroticism and negative attitudes towards action and positive attitudes towards inaction. Posted April 27, 2014.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: A Flashcard Strategy to Help Students Prepare for Three Types of Multiple-Choice Questions Commonly Found on Introductory Psychology Tests (2013)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) presents this resource (click to expand the Introductory Psychology category) by Drew Appleby to provide students with a research-based study strategy designed to help them understand, prepare for, and take multiple-choice tests more successfully. The 32 slides that accompany the introductory article familiarize students with three types of cognitive processes their instructors will commonly ask them to use in their classes and then invite them to model the behavior of their instructors by creating flashcards. Their flashcards should contain verbatim definitions for retention questions, accurate paraphrases for comprehension questions, and realistic examples for application questions.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 7, March 2014

March 30, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,964 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

As you know, the month of March is women’s history month and the media has been filled with all kinds of articles on gender differences. We’ve got some of the most fascinating collection of links on gender and gender differences, from man-tissues to an all-girl robotics team to a special episode in which the MythBusters question whether there is any evidence for gender differences in throwing by investigating the insult “You throw like a girl”.

Also, this month, we have located a series of videos illustrating attachment in both infants and adults. All in all, this is one of our newsiest issues in a long time!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Myth Busters You Throw Like a Girl

The Myth Busters team from the Discovery Channel bring out the evidence and take on the insult “You throw like a girl”. See how they debunk this myth of gender differences in this video (runs 3 minutes 39 seconds).

3. I’m An Engineer, Not A Cheerleader.

When 17-year old Sara Sakowitz and her all-girl robotics team were mistaken for cheerleaders instead of competitors, she described her frustration and dismay at one more micro aggression against smart non gender-conforming girls in this astute and moving opinion piece for “The Washington Post”, February 26, 2014.

4. Digging Into The Roots of Gender Differences

New research published in “Animal Behaviour” and summarized by Barbara J. King for NPR suggest that “[D]ata on wild chimpanzees from […] Tanzania, indicate that human sex differences in childhood are primarily the result of biological, evolutionary mechanisms.” Published March 21, 2014.

5. Google, Tell Me. Is My Son A Genius?

“MORE than a decade into the 21st century, we would like to think that American parents have similar standards and similar dreams for their sons and daughters. But my study of anonymous, aggregate data from Google searches suggests that contemporary American parents are far more likely to want their boys smart and their girls skinny.” So says commentator Seth Stephens-Davidowitz and he has the graphics and explanation to support this statement.

6.The Most Pointlessly Gendered Products

Plenty has been said on how gendered advertising is harmful by reinforcing ender stereotypes. But according to the “Feministing” website, gendered advertising has reached a new low. There are now tissues, bread, and eggs marketed to men and even pet shampoo marketed to the owners of male and female dogs. Is using gender to sell gender-irrelevant products taking things too far? These images ought to spark a lively discussion of stereotypes vs. true gender differences in personality. Published March 26, 2014.

7. The Hidden Messages in Children’s Books

“Adults often find surprising subtexts in children’s literature – but are they really there? Hephzibah Anderson delves into the world of Freud and fairy tales” in this piece for the BBC. Published March 19, 2014.

8. Psychoanalysis and Art

John Dodds built this site to support the psychology courses he teaches including a course on Psychoanalysis and Art and Psychoanalysis and Society. Includes syllabi, readings, visuals, and more, on Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Melanie Klein, and Object Relations.

9. Attachment Styles and Romantic Relationships

A description and illustration of the three patterns of adult attachment by Alex Sauciuc and Colin Ford with Professor Dana Kotter-Gruehn. Published April 10, 2013 (Runs 15 minutes, 12 seconds)

10. Attachment Styles in Adults

Actors portray interactions between a secure, anxious, and ambivalent woman and her boyfriend. Published December 1, 2012 (runs 4 minutes 19 seconds).

11. PsychAlive: Dr. Dan Siegel on Optimal Attachment in infants and adults

Published March 3, 2011. Runs 1 minute, 4 seconds.

12. PsychAlive: Dr. Dan Siegel on Avoidant Attachment in infants and adults

Published March 3, 2011. Runs 2 minutes, 3 seconds.

13. PsychAlive: Dr. Dan Siegel on Ambivalent Attachment in infants and adults

Published March 3, 2011. Runs 1 minute, 55 seconds.

14. PsychAlive: Dr. Dan Siegel on Disorganized Attachment in infants and adults

Published March 3, 2011. Runs 5 minutes, 29 seconds.

15. Does Teaching Kids to Get “Gritty” Help Them Get Ahead?

Summarizes the research by Angela Duckworth and describes how school are trying to teach students “grit” i.e., that persistence, determination and resilience are the keys to success in school and beyond. Tovia Smith visits a public school in Brooklyn and reports on how they have put Duckworth’s ideas into action. From NPR’s “Morning Edition”, March 17, 2014. Includes links to a a Grit scale and the mindset test of Carol Dweck. Part 1 Runs 7 minutes, 48 seconds; Part 2 runs 7 minutes, 43 seconds.

16. Grit Scale

According to psychologist Angela Duckworth, “Grit is the tendency to sustain interest in and effort toward very long-term goals”. The idea is that determination, persistence, and resilience are the keys to success. Take this short quiz and see how much grit you have compared to others.

17. Mindset Scale

When it comes to your own level of intelligence and other basic qualities, do you have more of a fixed mindset or more of a growth mindset? Take this 16-item quiz to find out your attitude toward basic abilities.

18. Why Sleep is Important and What Happens When You Don’t Get Enough

Summarizes research on sleep and sleep disorders and explains why it is so important that we get our rest. Published by the American Psychological Association March 30, 2014.

19. To Keep Teenagers Alert, School Let Them Sleep In

“The sputtering, nearly 20-year movement to start high schools later has recently gained momentum in communities like this one, as hundreds of schools in dozens of districts across the country have bowed to the accumulating research on the adolescent body clock.” according to this story in the “New York Times” published March 13, 2014.

20. Favorite Link Revisited: Psychological Differences Between the Sexes: A time capsule from 1964

This 1964 film claims that innate psychological and emotional differences between the sexes leads to problems in relationships and strives to educate young people to avoid these problems. But according to psychological research in the 50 years or more since this film was produced, are these truly sex differences or merely stereotypes? This obviously dated film is sure to spark discussion on these and related issues.

 

 

 


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 5, January 2014

January 27, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,930 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy New Year! And for many of you, Happy New Semester! We have quite the newsy newsletter this month, starting with a strange and disturbing crime: vandals attempted to steal the ancient Greek urn containing the ashes of Sigmund Freud and his wife Martha Bernays. The vase was damaged in the process and is now kept in a more secure location.

Also, 2013 ended with an exciting and controversial new finding suggesting that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. But before you let the news go to your head (so to speak) check out the astute critique of the research and interpretation of the evidence by cognitive psychologist Christian Jarrett.

Finally, you may have noticed that we’ve spruced the place up a bit. We are in the process of adding photos and changing the page layout to make the site more readable.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Urn Containing Sigmund Freud’s Ashes Smashed During Theft Attempt

“Staff at the crematorium in Golders Green discovered broken pieces of the urn, which dates from around 300BC and came from Freud’s collection of antiquities, lying on the floor on New Year’s Day, after thieves apparently broke in overnight and smashed it in the attempt to steal it.” The severely damaged urn was subsequently moved to a secure location according to staff at the crematorium. From “The Guardian”, January 15, 2014.

3. Male and Female Brains Wired Differently, Scans Reveal

According to research by Madhura Ingalhalikar and colleagues and summarized here “Scientists have drawn on nearly 1,000 brain scans to confirm what many had surely concluded long ago: that stark differences exist in the wiring of male and female brains.” Evidence suggests that men’s brains have more connectivity within each hemisphere; women have more connectivity between the hemispheres. From “The Guardian”, December 2, 2013.

4. Getting in a Tangle Over Men’s and Women’s Brain Wiring

Christian Jarrett for “Brain Watch” takes a critical view of the research and the interpretation of the evidence suggesting that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. Posted December 4, 2013.

5. Is Narcissism Essential for Success?

The Association for Psychological Science reports the results of a study which suggests that “While narcissists are more likely to garner leadership positions, there was no evidence of a link between narcissism and a leader’s success . . . the poorest leaders are those with either extremely high or extremely low levels of narcissism.” January 17, 2014.

6. B. F. Skinner at the APA Annual Convention 1990

“Behavioral psychologist Dr. B. F. Skinner presented this keynote address at the American Psychological Association’s 1990 Annual Convention. In Dr. Skinner’s last public appearance, he expresses his belief that the proper role for psychological science is the analysis of behavior. He speaks about the path psychology has followed over the years, from early introspection methods to three kinds of variation and selection, including natural selection, the evolution of operant conditioning, and the evolution of culture.” August 10, 1990. (in English with Spanish subtitles). Runs 20 minutes, 56 seconds.

7. Nicholas Claus: Big Five for the Big Guy

Heather A. Haas wrote this humorous “case study” of Santa Claus using the big five. Find out whether the big guy is high or low on Extraversion Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism and Openness and the “evidence” she used to make her judgements in “Dialogue”, the newsletter of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, volume 19 (1), Spring 2004, p. 24-25, 21.

8. Parents Sinking Some Kids With Their Puffed-up Praise, Study Finds

Research by Eddie Brummelman and colleagues suggests that “Moms and dads who bathe kids in exaggerated flattery to boost low self-esteem are stifling the very children they hope to elevate, a new study shows.” From “NBC News”, January 3, 2014.

9. Should Every Kid Get a Trophy Just for Participating?

SportzEdge.com presents this discussion by their commentators on whether children ought to get a trophy just for participating. Presents some interesting ideas to get your students thinking. Runs 7 minutes, 11 seconds.

10. Editing Your Life’s Stories Can Create Happier Endings

This piece from the NPR program “All Things Considered” uses the example of the author Lulu Miller’s nephew to illustrate the work of psychologist Tim Wilson. “Wilson has been studying how small changes in a person’s own stories and memories can help with emotional health. He calls the process “story editing” And he says small tweaks in the interpretation of life events can reap huge benefits.” From January 1, 2014. Includes a link to listen to the story, which runs 8 minutes, 54 second.

11. The Meaningful Life is a Road Worth Traveling

“A Stanford research project explored the key differences between lives of happiness and meaningfulness. While the two are similar, dramatic differences exist – and one should not underestimate the power of meaningfulness. “The quest for meaning is a key part of what makes us human,” ” Jennifer Aaker and her colleagues concluded. From the “Stanford News”, January 1, 2014.

12. A Case Study Using CBT

The Australian Institute of Professional Counselors presents this excerpt from a counseling session of an actual client to illustrate the four basic steps of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: identify the automatic thought, question the validity of the automatic thought, and challenge core beliefs. Posted March 22, 2010.

13. CBT in Action: A Case Study

Dr. Nicholas Jenner, a counseling psychologist, illustrates how the use of Daily Mood Sheets can help clients see the the feelings and emotions caused by a triggering event. He presents this case study of “Jodie” and how she was able to recognize her problematic thought patterns and where they came from through therapy.

14. Psychologists Put the ‘Selfie’ On the Couch

Psychologists Lisa Obran and Andrew Przybylski explore both the positive (e.g., “self exploration and identity experimentation” in the service of relatedness needs and identity formation) and the negative (e.g.,”indulg[ing] in a narcissistic activity”) sides of selfies in this video for the #BBCtrending program. (runs 1 minute, 29 seconds).

15. Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over

“When a team of scientists in Finland asked people to map out where they felt different emotions on their bodies, they found that the results were surprisingly consistent, even across cultures.” From NPR Health News, December 30, 2013.

16. The Orchid Effect: How Relationships and Genetics Influence Your Health

Research by S. C. Suth and R. F. Krueger, published in “Psychological Science” found evidence for a genotype-environment interaction or “an orchid effect” in which “really bad marriages are capable of turning on (and even amplifying) any genetic predispositions one might have to experiencing poor health. But really good marriages may help “good health” genes thrive more so than they would have otherwise.” From the “Science of Relationships” blog, December 2, 2013.

17. Fearful ‘Memories’ Passed Between Generations Through Genetic Code

Jeremy Dean of PsyBlog summarizes a study by Dias and Ressler (2013) which found evidence that mice who were conditioned to become afraid of a particular smell passed that fear onto their offspring. Could this transgenerational genetic response happen in humans? That’s the big question. Published December 5, 2013.

18. Missing “Brake in the Brain” Can Trigger Anxiety

According to research published in the journal “Cerebral Cortex” and summarized here “social phobias and fear can be triggered in the brain [by] a missing inhibitory connection or missing “brake” in the brain.” “Science Daily”, December 4, 2013.

19. Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice

Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: “I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Freud.” (runs 2 minutes)


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 3, November, 2013

November 30, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,905 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

As we in the United States celebrate Thanksgiving by reflecting on all that we are thankful for, it only seems fitting that we here at Personality Pedagogy share our gratitude with you. This month we are particularly grateful for new scales to add to our extensive online collection of legitimate personality questionnaires, Google (and their “doodle” honoring Herman Rorschach in particular), selfies, a certain fox who says things, and, of course, you, our loyal readers.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Scholarly Reflections On The ‘Selfie’

Oxford dictionaries choose ’selfie’ as their Word of the Year 2013. To celebrate, several scholars from different fields shared their thoughts selfies including psychologists Robert Arkin and Mark R. Leary.

3. Psychoanalytic Perspective Illustrated: Bless You Hawkeye

Jill Payne, George Mason University via the PsychTeach discussion list, suggested that the episode of the TV series M*A*S*H titled “Bless You Hawkeye” (1981) “nicely illustrates some Freudian constructs. The tone of the episode is serious–not derisive–and emotional as well.” In this episode (Season 9, Episode 17), Hawkeye develops a sneeze, which cannot be explained by an allergy or other medical condition. Eventually, the psychiatrist, recurring character Sidney Freedman, is brought in to talk to him and they discover the root of his problem lies in an event from childhood triggered by a specific smell. The episode illustrates Freudian concepts such as reaction formation, psychosomatic symptoms, importance of childhood memories, slips of the tongue, repressed memory, stream of consciousness, and talk therapy. The entire episode runs about 24 minutes, but you could cut the first two scenes (before the Psychiatrist interviews Hawkeye) and the final scene (the Poker game) if time is an issue. If the link above does not work for you, try searching for it elsewhere on the Internet. See a synopsis of the episode here: http://aftermash.blogspot.com/2009/11/episode-211-bless-you-hawkeye.html.

4. Openness to Experience and Creative Achievement

Summarizes research by Scott Barry Kaufman, identifying four factors of Openness/Intellect: Affective Engagement, Aesthetic Engagement, Intellectual Engagement, and Explicit Cognitive Ability. Each factor relates slightly differently to creative achievement in arts and sciences. He concludes that “These results support the need to separate different forms of cognitive engagement when trying to predict creative achievement. Different forms of engagement are related to different modes of information processing. What’s more, people differ in their drive to engage in various aspects of the human experience, and these drives are related to different forms of creative achievement.” From “Scientific American”, November 25, 2013.

5. The Evolution of Beauty

Back in 1959 geneticist Dmitry Belyaev started an experiment in Russia in which he bred silver foxes to make them tamer, and thus easier to raise for their prized fur. However, selecting for friendly behavior had the unanticipated result of also selecting for certain facial features. The result is that the same hormones which regulate behavior also regulates physical development. But even more amazing is the implication that beauty and an even temperament and friendliness also co-occur in humans. Read all about the findings in this fascinating article from “The Economist”, November 16, 2013.

6. The Paradoxical Traits Of Resilient People

Entrepreneur Faisal Hoque, writing for “Leadership Now” argues that resilient people, those who are able to bend but not break during adversity, possess the paradoxical traits of control, acceptance, and using adversity to change for the better.

7. The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS-X)

The PANAS-X, contains 60 items measuring general positive and negative affect and 11 specific affects including fear, sadness, guilt, hostility, shyness, fatigue, surprise, joviality, self-assurance, attentiveness, and serenity. This link is to the manual by David Watson and Lee Anna Clark (1994). Opens in PDF format. Also available in a Japanese version here: http://www2.psychology.uiowa.edu/faculty/Clark/J-PANAS.pdf

8. The Gratitude Questionnaire — Six Item Form (GQ-6)

“The GQ-6 is a short, self-report measure of the disposition to experience gratitude. Participants answer 6 items on a 1 to 7 scale (1 = ‘strongly disagree’, 7 = ‘strongly agree’). Two items are reverse-scored to inhibit response bias. The GQ-6 has good internal reliability, with alphas between .82 and .87, and there is evidence that the GQ-6 is positively related to optimism, life satisfaction, hope, spirituality and religiousness, forgiveness, empathy and prosocial behavior, and negatively related to depression, anxiety, materialism and envy. The GQ-6 takes less than 5 minutes to complete, but there is no time limit.” From McCullough, M. E., Emmons, R. A., & Tsang, J. (2002). The Grateful Disposition: A conceptual and Empirical Topography. “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82”, 112-127.

9. Gratitude Resentment and Appreciation Test (GRAT) Revised and Short Forms

According to Watkins et al. (2003), “A grateful person would not feel deprived in life, they would have a sense of abundance […] acknowledge the contribution of others to their success and well-being, […] appreciate life’s simple pleasures, and […] acknowledge the importance of experiencing and expressing gratitude. Their conceptualisation of gratitude was shown to correlate with measures of subjective well-being and positive affect. The revised GRAT consists of 44 items measuring these characteristics. The short-form GRAT consists of 16 items. Both scales are rated on a nine point scale from I strongly disagree to I strongly agree with the statement”. From Watkins, P. C., Woodward, K., Stone, T., & Kolts, R. L. (2003). Gratitude and happiness: Development of a measure of gratitude, and relationship with subjective well-being. “Social Behavior & Personality: An International Journal, 31”, 431-452.

10. Gratitude Resentment and Appreciation Test (GRAT)

Watkins, P. C., Woodward, K., Stone, T., & Kolts, R. L. (2003). Gratitude and happiness: Development of a measure of gratitude, and relationship with subjective well-being. “Social Behavior & Personality: An International Journal, 31”, 431-452. Opens in PDF format.

11. Herman Rorschach’s 129 Birthday Google Doodle

On November 8, 2013, “Google” honored Swiss psychologist Hermann Rorschach with a shape-changing doodle reminiscent of the famous personality test with his name (and controversial validity and reliability).

12. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Sciences.

Maintained by the National University of Ireland, Galway, this site is “designed to be a repository for instruments that are used to collect data from across the social sciences. Please use the site to discover instruments you can use in you own research. We now have more than 500 instruments concerned with a wide range of topics (e.g. autism, health, pain). You can use the search function above to search the database using pre-identified key words, or generate your own terms to search the instrument titles.” Researchers are welcome to submit any scales, questionnaires, and instruments that they have developed in an easy to use wiki-like format. See the site for details.

13. Sense of Belonging Increases Meaningfulness of Life

“[B]elonging to a group provided meaning over and above the value of others or the help they could provide. It’s more than just bonding, therefore, but really feeling like you are fitting in with others which is associated with higher levels of meaningfulness. Just the reverse effect has been shown in previous studies. People who feel excluded from social groups tend to feel that life has less meaning”, according to new research by Lambert et al. (2013) and summarized here in “PsyBlog”, November 25, 2013.

14. 10 Things You Should Know About Goals

“Your brain is a goal-setting machine, and research is illuminating why”, according to this article in “Psychology Today”, October 22, 2013.

15. You’re So Self-Controlling

Is our sense of time, not our lack of willpower, the real issue? While we generally think that delay of gratification is a good thing, research on decision making by Joseph Kable and Joseph McGuire suggests that since the timing of real-world events is often unpredictable, giving up can be a rational response to a time frame that is off. From “The New York Times”, November 16, 2013, by Maria Konnikova.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: Five-Ful Envelopes

In this activity, by Barbara Frederickson, participants explore the positive emotions of hopeful, joyful, peaceful, playful, and thankful, and brainstorm ways of increasing the frequency and intensity of these positive emotions in their lives. From the January 2010 issue of the Thiagi Gameletter (Seriously fun activities for trainers, facilitators, performance consultants, and managers, see their website: http://www.thiagi.com/).


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 1, September, 2013

October 1, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,856 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we bring you an unprecedented number of links to invigorate your personality classes, including a 3-part battle between the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and critics who find it lacks validity. In addition, just in time for you to prepare for Halloween next month, we found one of the strangest links yet. Our friend Michael Britt, he of The Psych Files, presents this highly original and unforgettable way of helping students keep the Psychosexual Stages straight. Freud as a zombie! Yes, you heard it here first, folks. As if arm wrestling with Freud wasn’t scary enough… As a chaser, we let Freud speak for himself in his own voice in our Favorite Link Revisited.

This month we want to give a special shout-out to Personality Pedagogy friends Kelvin Seifert and Zsuszanna Szabo at the Teaching Ed Psych Wiki. Sponsored by the Teaching Educational Psychology special interest group of the American Educational Research Association, The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki tries to be especially thorough. They are open to submissions and suggestions so check them out at the link below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki

The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki is a “collection of materials helpful in teaching introductory educational psychology in teacher education programs” including class activities and demonstrations, course assignments, course syllabi, and materials on specific topics within educational psychology.

3. How to Memorize Freud’s Stages of Psychosexual Development

From the site: “Need to memorize Freud’s stages of psychosexual development for a test? Here’s a mnemonic that should do the trick. In this brief video, the founder of psychoanalysis gives you a mnemonic and explains the 5 stages for you. What do orangutans and ogres have to do with Freud’s stages? They’ll help you remember them, that’s what. Find out how in this video episode” of “The Psych Files” podcast, Episode 202, September 7, 2013. (runs 4 minutes, 43 seconds).

4. Say Goodbye to MBTI, The Fad That Won’t Die

Wharton professor and author Adam Grant explains how a good personality test ought to have reliability, validity, and be independent and comprehensive. He describes what these standards are and proceeds to weigh the evidence and concludes that the Myers-Briggs Personality Inventory is not a very good personality test. Posted September, 2013.

5. MBTI, If You Want Me Back, You Need to Change Too

A follow up to the previous article (Say Goodbye to the MBTI), Wharton professor and author Adam Grant explains what needs to happen in order for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to become a better personality test. He writes his critiques in the very entertaining form of a letter to a former love.

6. The Myers-Briggs Assessment is No Fad

In response to Wharton professor and author Adam Grant’s previous essays critiquing the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPP, the company which publishes the MBTI and trains test administrators, published this rejoinder defending their product.

7. Online Psychology Laboratory

According to the website, “OPL provides highly interactive resources for the teaching of psychological science. The peer-reviewed materials include online studies and correlational studies, large data sets, demonstrations, and teaching aids.”

8. The Link Between Personality and Immunity

Research suggests that “basic personality markers — extraversion, hostility, and optimism among them — do seem to play a role in how well someone wards off sickness.” Read about the latest findings here in the Association for Psychological Science “Observer”, September, 2013.

9. Abraham Maslow and the pyramid that beguiled business

The BBC News Magazine takes a look at the question “The psychologist Abraham Maslow’s theory of human motivation is 70 years old but continues to have a strong influence on the world of business. What is it, and is it right?” August 31, 2013.

10. How Evolution Works, Animated in Minimalist Motion Graphics

This simple and engaging cartoon explains the basics of evolution and “why DNA copying errors explain blue eyes”. Runs 11 minutes 48 seconds. Warning: contains a cartoon depiction of sex at 4:13.

11. 23 Signs You’re Secretly a Narcissist Masquerading as a Sensitive Introvert

Past research has suggested that there are two types of Narcissism: “Grandiosity-Exhibitionism” and “Vulnerability-Sensitivity”. While both types share a common core of traits including conceit, arrogance, and “the tendency to give in to one’s own needs and disregard others” they present differently according to research summarized in this article. Includes a 23-item scale measuring Hypersensitive Narcissism.

12. Hypersensitive Narcissism Scale

This 23-item scale was recently presented by Jonathan Cheek, Holly Hendin, and Paul Wink at the 2013 Association for Research in Personality conference.

13. 23 Signs You’re Secretly An Introvert

From the website: “Think you can spot an introvert in a crowd? Think again. Although the stereotypical introvert may be the one at the party who’s hanging out alone by the food table fiddling with an iPhone, the “social butterfly” can just as easily have an introverted personality” according to this illustrated article from “The Huffington Post”, August 29, 2013.

14. 31 Unmistakable Signs That You’re An Introvert

“BuzzFeed” put together this entertaining series of gifs illustrating what it’s like to be an introvert.

15. Psychology Teaching Ideas: A Blog for Teachers of AS and A2 Psychology

Experienced teacher of A Level Psychology in the UK, Caroline Rigby created this blog “for teachers of A Level Psychology. Posts on this blog include ideas to keep teaching topical by using Psychology related news and publications in the classroom and ways to ensure students experience Psychology at A Level in a way that equips them with the thinking and study skills for future study.”

16. Is Baby Male or Female? Germans Offer Third Gender

In Germany, newborn babies with ambiguous genitalia will no longer be rigidly labeled male or female on their birth certificates. Parents may indicate “undetermined” or “unspecified”, wait until later in the child’s life to declare a gender, or even never officially declare a gender. From “ABC News”, August 22, 2013.

17. Attachment Explained: Peppermint Patty, Lucy van Pelt, Schroeder, and Charlie Brown…

Bartholomew and Horowitz’ four categories of attachment are visualized using characters from the classic cartoon “Peanuts”.

18. 7 Persistent Myths about Introverts and Extroverts

PsychCentral presents this list of myths from the one that introverts are shy and don’t make good public speakers to the one that extroverts are shallow and don’t like quiet time.

19. The Dance Between Codependents & Narcissists

This article from “PsychCentral” describes the “codependency dance” between the narcissistic taker/controller and the codependent pleaser/fixer.

20. Why Parenting Can Never Have a Rule Book: Children’s Genetics Significantly Affect How They Are Parented

A meta-analysis published in the October 2013 “Personality and Social Psychology Review” by Reut Avinun and Ariel Knafo describes how individual parenting styles may be a reaction to the child’s genotype in this summary from “Science Daily”, September 3, 2013.

21. Men and Women Are the Same Species!

“Similarities between the sexes can be as important as differences” according to this summary of areas of differences and similarity between the sexes by Agustín Fuentes for “Psychology Today”, May 24, 2012.

22. So, What’s Your Story?

“What are some of the harmful stories you tell about yourself, and how could you rewrite those stories to be more supportive and nurturing of who you really are?” Read about how we can change the stories we tell about ourselves by Melissa Kirk for “Psychology Today”, April 27, 2012.

23. Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice

Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: “I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 1, September, 2013


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 4, December, 2012

December 26, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,700 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

From giving presents to starting a new class off right in the new year, this month we are happy to present to you 13 links for the 12 days of Christmas (bonus!). Whether you are celebrating this holiday or just taking a break from the usual load of classes and commitments, here at Personality Pedagogy we wish you a happy holiday season and a happy 2013!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

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2. The Person Inside the Present: Narcissists Buy to Big Themselves Up

Just as you suspected, “people with narcissistic tendencies want to purchase products, both for others and for themselves, that positively distinguish them — that is, that make them stand out from the crowd” according to research summarized here in “ScienceDaily”, December 17, 2012.

3. Prosocial Personality Battery

56-item and 30-item scales from Penner, L. A., Fritzsche, B. A., Craiger, J. P., & Freifeld, T. S. (1995). Measuring the prosocial personality. In J. N. Butcher, & C. D. Spielberger (Eds.) Advances in personality assessment, (Vol. 12). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Include subscales measuring Social Responsibility (SR), Empathic Concern (EC), Perspective Taking (PT), Personal Distress (PD), Other-Oriented Moral Reasoning (O), Mutual Concerns moral reasoning (M), Self-reported altruism (SRA), Other-oriented empathy (sum of scores on SR, EC, PT, O, M) and Helpfulness (sum of PD (reversed) and SRA).

4. Think Yourself Well

Summarizes research by Barbara Fredrickson and Bethany Kok demonstrating that people with strong muscle tone of the a nerve which regulates that heart “are better than those with low at stopping bad feelings getting overblown. They also show more positive emotions in general. This may provide the missing link between emotional well-being and physical health.” From The Economist, December 8, 2012.

5. Neuroscience Fiction

This article takes a fascinating and critical look at the field of neuroscience and suggests that “The real problem with neuroscience today isn’t with the science (…) it’s with the expectations. The brain is an incredibly complex ensemble, with billions of neurons coming into—and out of—play at any given moment. There will eventually be neuroscientific explanations for much of what we do; but those explanations will turn out to be incredibly complicated. For now, our ability to understand how all those parts relate is quite limited, sort of like trying to understand the political dynamics of Ohio from an airplane window above Cleveland.” By Gary Marcus for “The New Yorker”, December 2, 2012.

6. Promoting Motivation, Health, and Excellence: Ed Deci at TEDxFlourCity

Ed Deci, professor of psychology at University of Rochester and Co-Founder of Self-Determination Theory, describes “two common forms of motivation; autonomous and controlled. He discusses the different results of each form and the implications for aspects of our lives; especially work and relationships” in this TED talk from June 9, 2012 (runs 14 minutes, 6 seconds).

7. Anal Personality? South Korea’s Toilet Culture

The Toilet Culture Park, “the only one of its kind in the world, exhibits a variety of bowls from Korean traditional squat toilets to western bedpans.” Check out this slide show of 11 images from the park. Posted November 23, 2012.

8. The Possible Role of Epigenetics in Sexual Orientation

“Epigenetics — how gene expression is regulated by temporary switches, called epi-marks — appears to be a critical and overlooked factor contributing to the long-standing puzzle of why homosexuality occurs, according to a study, published online in “The Quarterly Review of Biology”, and summarized here in “Medical News Today”, December 13, 2012.

9. General Resources: A Guide to Writing Learning Objectives for Teachers of Psychology (2012)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to announce a new resource for teachers: “A Guide to Writing Learning Objectives for Teachers of Psychology (2012)” by Guy A. Boysen of the State University of New York at Fredonia and McKendree University.  The purpose of this 18-page resource is to assist psychology teachers in (a) understanding key terms related to objectives and their assessment, (b) writing behavior-based learning objectives, and (c) evaluating objectives once they are written. The resource includes a table that illustrates how various psychology outcomes can be addressed with objectives at various levels of Bloom’s taxonomy.

10. Commitment-Phobic Adults Could Have Mom and Dad to Blame

“A study of the romantic history of 58 adults aged 22-28 found that those who avoid committed romantic relationships are likely a product of unresponsive or over-intrusive parenting” according to research by Sharon Dekel and Barry Farber published in the “Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease” and summarized here in “ScienceDaily”, December 10, 2012.

11. Scientists Debunk the IQ Myth

“After conducting the largest online intelligence study on record, a Western University-led research team has concluded that the notion of measuring one’s intelligence quotient or IQ by a singular, standardized test is highly misleading, according to research published in the journal “Neuron” and summarized here, in “ScienceDaily”, December 19, 2012.

12. Relative Length of Adults’ Fingers Indicator of Verbal Aggression: Prenatal Exposure to Testosterone Linked

A new study links verbal aggression to prenatal testosterone exposure, using the 2D:4D finger ratio measure to predict verbal aggression. “This study is the first to use this method to examine prenatal testosterone exposure as a determinant of a communication trait” according to the study published in the “Journal of Communication” and summarized here in “ScienceDaily”, November 29, 2012.

13. Bullying by Childhood Peers Leaves a Trace That Can Change the Expression of a Gene Linked to Mood

A recent study suggests that bullying by peers changes the structure surrounding a gene involved in regulating mood, making victims more vulnerable to mental health problems as they age, according to research published in the journal “Psychological Medicine” and summarized here in “ScienceDaily”, December 18, 2012.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: First Day of Class

First Day of Class Beginnings are important says Joyce T. Povlacs of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This list of 101 Things You Can Do the First Three Weeks of Class which she put together is a catalog of suggestions for college teachers who are looking for a fresh way of creating the best possible environment for learning. (Opens in PDF)