Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 6, February 2015

March 5, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,124 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we present a short newsletter for a short month. Enjoy!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Genetics: Do Your Hands Have Family Traits?

Check out these two projects from Science Buddies: “In these hands-on genetics projects and activities, students investigate a family pedigree to see if they can determine whether traits are dominant or recessive. Do you and some (or all) of your family members share certain physical traits? Is a widow’s peak passed down from generation to generation? Find out!”

3. The Association Method

“Originally published in the Collected Papers on Analytical Psychology in 1916, The Association Method was the first of three lectures Carl Jung delivered at the celebration of the twentieth anniversary of the opening of Clark University in September, 1909.”

4. Jung on Meeting Freud

Carl G. Jung discusses his first encounter with Sigmund Freud (runs 37 seconds).

5. A Navy SEAL Explains 8 Secrets to Grit and Resilience

Eric Barker of the “Barking Up The Wrong Tree” blog presents this look into how reality compares to the theory of grit and resilience.

6. Extroverts Come in Two Different Types Brain Scans Reveal

New research finds evidence for brain differences between agentic extroverts (the outgoing, persistent, assertive, achievement-focused extroverts) and affiliative extroverts (the affectionate, friendly, and sociable extroverts).

7. Introverts Prefer Mountains

“In a series of three studies, researchers tested whether there is a link between [the five factors of] personality and an aspect of physical ecology: flat terrain versus mountainous terrain.”

8. The Emotion Which Has a Wonderful Protective Effect on Mind and Body

“Positive emotions, especially the feeling of awe, have been linked to lower levels of inflammatory cytokines by a new study [which] suggests that the positive feeling from enjoying the beauty of nature or getting lost in a painting or symphony can actually help protect the body against heart disease, arthritis, depression, and even Alzheimer’s disease.” The research was done by Jennifer Stellar,  Neha John-Henderson, Craig L. Anderson, Amie M. Gordon, Galen D. McNeil, and Dacher Keltner,  and published in the journal “Emotion”.

9. Coming Out Exercise

Barry A. Schreier of Purdue University developed this exercise to “assist individuals with the experience of loss that is often associated with Coming Out. Loss can come in many ways from the loss of a job, the loss of friends and family members, the loss of autonomy, loss of affiliation with others, and so on. This exercise is used to access the vital emotional components of participants’ belief and attitude systems in the efforts of creating greater inclusivity in attitude and belief for people who are Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual”

10. Favorite Link Revisited: Jung Speaks

PsicoMundo, a Spanish language website about psychoanalysis, has two audio clips in their Galería de Sonidos (Gallery of Sounds) of Carl Jung speaking (the clips are in English). Fragmento 1 (Fragment 1) is 16 seconds, Fragmento 2 (Fragment 2) is 23 seconds. They are available for listening (para escuchar) on line or off line.

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 5, January, 2013

January 26, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,725 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy New Year! Happy New Month! And for many of you, Happy New Semester! As much as I hate the darkness of winter here on the East Coast, I do relish the chance to start again with new beginnings. If you are like me, then you will welcome this month’s newsletter filled with new things to refresh and renew your personality psychology classes.

Speaking of happy, we’ve got a bit of a debate of sorts happening in this issue. Check out three of our newest links suggesting that money does buy happiness —  but that there’s more to life than being happy, and judge for yourself.

This month marks 20 years since the first fMRI study was published. To celebrate, the APS journal Perspectives on Psychological Science features a special section in which leading scientists reflect on the contributions this brain scanning technique has made to our understanding of human thought. While not strictly related to personality, the reflections are nonetheless interesting. Check it out here.

Special thanks goes out to Jon Mueller for the link to the Easy Bake Oven controversy (see below). Be sure to check out his newsletter and website if you are interested in teaching social psychology.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Maslow’s Theory of Self-Actualization, More or Less Actualized

Psychologist Ann Reitan reflects on Abraham Maslow’s notion of self-actualization. First, she explains what it is, then she muses on what it means for different people at different times in their lives, drawing on the work of Eric Erikson. Finally, she suggests that self-actualizing people may find meaning at lower levels of the hierarchy, such as when their needs are being threatened. She gives examples of people who she believed were actualizing while facing death (e.g., Viktor Frankl), fearing for their safety (e.g., Nelson Mandela), losing their freedom (e.g., Ghandi), and experiencing mental illness (e.g., Sylvia Plath). From “Brain Blogger”, January 8, 2013.

3. There’s More to Life Than Being Happy

According to Viktor Frankl, “It is the very pursuit of happiness that thwarts happiness,” and yet Americans and American psychology are obsessed with happiness. Meaningfulness and happiness are not the same thing, and this article draws on new work by Roy Baumeister, Kathleen Vohs, Jennifer Aaker & Emily Garbinsky (2013) to understand the difference. From “The Atlantic”, January 9, 2013. Their forthcoming paper in the “Journal of Positive Psychology” is available here: http://tinyurl.com/b8mbayk (opens in PDF format).

4. Yes, Money Does Buy Happiness: 6 Lessons from the Newest Research on Income and Well-Being

A summary of 6 observations from the paper “The New Stylized Facts about Income and Subjective Well-Being” by Daniel W. Sacks, Betsey Stevenson, and Justin Wolfers. From “The Atlantic,” January 10, 2013.

5. Implicit Assessment of The Five Factors

Researches have hit upon an implicit way of measuring personality, the “semantic misattribution procedure”. “In this initial study, and two more involving nearly 300 participants … participants’ scores on this test for conscientiousness, neuroticism and extraversion correlated with explicit measures of the same traits. The new implicit test also did a better job than explicit measures alone of predicting relevant behaviours, such as church attendance, perseverance on a lab task, and punctuality. The implicit scores for extraversion showed good consistency over 6 months. Finally, the new implicit test showed fewer signs of being influenced by social desirability concerns, as compared with traditional explicit measures.” From “BPS Research Digest”, December 13, 2012.

6. Assessing Personality via Social Media Postings: TruthSerum.com

TruthSerum.com claims to assess personality though people’s social media posts. Users can analyze their own personality and see how they compare to Barak Obama, Mitt Romney, Abraham Lincoln, the Unabomber Ted Kaczynski and some 135 other famous people on Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Machiavellianism, Narcissism, and Psychopathy (aka, Psychoticism).

7. You Can’t See It, But You’ll be a Different Person in 10 Years

“No matter how old people are, they seem to believe that who they are today is essentially who they’ll be tomorrow.” according to the End of History Illusion. According to researcher Daniel Gilbert, “Life is a process of growing and changing, and what our results suggest is that growth and change really never stops … despite the fact that at every age from 18 to 68, we think it’s pretty much come to a close.” You can listen to the original segment and comment by Gilbert here, on the NPR website (runs 3 minutes, 58 seconds) or read a more in-depth summary from the “New York Times” here.

8. Sexism-Free Easy Bake Oven On the Way

Due to the protests started by 13-year old McKenna Pope (here) and backed by big-name chefs including Bobby Flay, and the general public, Hasbro, the makers of the class Easy-Bake, oven will launch a new line of gender-neutral ovens that will feature gender-neutral colors and more boys in their advertisements.

9. Activities Guide: Teaching Ethics in the Introduction to Psychology Course

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to announce this new resource for teachers by Ana Ruiz and Judith Warchal of Alvernia University. “This 23-page guide presents 17 activities related to ethics for each chapter in a typical Introduction to Psychology text as it integrates the APA Learning Goals and Outcomes for ethics into that course.  For each chapter, the activity lists the student learning outcome, instructions for conducting the activity, materials needed, approximate time required, and a method of assessment.” Activities most relevant to the personality class include APA ethics code jeopardy, research methods, personality testing, and debating controversial topics.

10. Who’s Gay On TV? Dads, Journalists, Investigators, And Footmen

Presents an interesting account of the various portrayals of gays and lesbians found on TV today. Though the number of gays and lesbians has increased in recent years, for some, the portrayals may not be as realistic as they could be. Published January 3, 2013. (also available in audio running 7 minutes, 45 seconds).

11. Gorillas, Watermelons and Sperm: The Greatest Genomes Sequenced in 2012

Scientists identified the genetic codes of some of the world’s most fascinating animals and plants. Check out what they found in this online photo gallery of 8 stunning images posted by “Popular Science”, January 2, 2013.

12. The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational

A good summary of 12 common flaws in our thinking including the confirmation bias, gambler’s fallacy, neglecting probability, the current moment bias, the anchoring effect, and more.

13. A Chart of Emotions that Have No Names in the English Language

Designer Pei-Ying Lin has created interesting conceptual charts of emotions including one for emotions that have no names in the English language and another for new emotions invented by the Internet.

14. Neurotic People Might Have Better Health Outcomes When They are High in Conscientiousness.

People who are high in Neuroticism and Conscientiousness experience lower levels of Interleukin 6 (IL-6), a biomarker for inflammation and chronic disease; lower body-mass index scores; and fewer diagnosed chronic health conditions. From “Prevention News”, November 2012.

15. Darwin Was Wrong About Dating

New research is beginning to question the long-accepted evolutionary explanation for various mating behaviors. Read about some of the alternative explanations and new data on sex differences in mating strategies, selectiveness, and desire for casual sex. From “The New York Times,” January 12, 2013.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: Careers in Psychology

From the website: “Are you preparing yourself for a career in psychology? Well, you’ve come to the right place! We understand your enthusiasm and eagerness to get started in a growing and lucrative field like psychology. However, we also know how difficult it can be to get started in this field, which is exactly why we’re here.” The site features background information on careers, degree paths, programs, internships, licensure information, interviews with psychology professionals, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 2, October, 2012

October 29, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,598 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are greatly saddened to learn of the untimely death of Christopher Peterson. Peterson, among the 100 most cited psychologists, was an inspiring teacher and creative researcher and advocate in the field of positive psychology, which he once described as the”scientific study of what makes life most worth living.” Read more about his life and work here and check out our first and last links below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than “Personality Pedagogy”.

2.The Good Life

In tribute to Christopher Peterson, a founding father of the positive psychology movement, “Psychology Today” put together this special online issue highlighting the life and legacy of Christopher Peterson, research pioneer, colleague, and teacher.

3. Careers in Psychology

A resource for students who are interested in pursuing a career in the field of psychology. The site has career and licensure info, jobs, internships, and commentary by experts — some of the top psychologists in the world — and more.

4. The Marshmallow Study Revisited

This classic measurement of children’s self-control was replicated and updated in a study published in Cognition this month and summarized here, October 11, 2012. Children who experienced reliable interactions immediately before the marshmallow task waited on average four times longer — 12 versus three minutes — than youngsters in similar but unreliable situations. Includes photos and video from the study, and a graph of results.

5. Persuasive Messages Tied to Personality

The “Eclipse Writer Blog” presents a summary of the research by Hirsh et al. (2012) which found that advertising was more effective when it was tailored to the levels of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness of the target audience. Includes some interesting suggestions on how to apply these findings to advertising. See also Hirsh, Jacob, Sonia Kang and Galen Bodenhausen, Personalized Persuasion: Tailoring Persuasive Appeals to Recipients’ Personality Traits, “Psychological Science”, 30 April 2012.

6. The Bem Sex Role Inventory

According to the site: “The Bem Sex Role Inventory was developed in 1971 by Dr. Sandra Lipsitz Bem. It characterizes your personality as masculine, feminine, androgynous, or undifferentiated. The BSRI is based on gender stereotypes, so what it’s actually measuring is how well you fit into your traditional sex role. Thus, your score may say as much about how our cultural expectations have changed over the last 35 years as it does about your personality.” You can take the original 60-item scale and receive your scores automatically online here.

7. Teampedia: Tools for Teams

Teampedia is a “collaborative encyclopedia of free team building activities, free icebreakers, teamwork resources, and tools for teams that anyone can edit!
This site is designed for a wide audience including: team leaders, trainers, teachers, managers, camp directors, counselors, and youth groups.”

8. Understanding That You’ll Never Be Perfect

Writer Therese J. Borchard muses on what it’s like to live with perfectionism and finally learn to let it go.

9. Pupil Dilation Reveals Sexual Orientation

“Pupils were highly telling: they widened most to videos of people who participants found attractive, thereby revealing where they were on the sexual spectrum from heterosexual to homosexual”, according to research published in PLoS ONE and summarized here, in “Science Daily,” August 6, 2012.

10. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy Video Toolkit

This toolkit consists of seven videos, up to 16 minutes each, with accompanying worksheets and information, on “Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy” (MBCT) by Jay Uhdinger.

11. Is it Better to be an Introvert or an Extrovert?

Blogger Erik Barker summarizes research on the strengths and weaknesses of introverts and extroverts.

12. Was Freud Wrong? Are Dreams the Brain’s Start-Up Test?

“Measurements taken from sleeping people explain, at least in part, why dreams tend to have such bizarre but vivid story lines. The findings deal a blow to the Freudian interpretation of dreams but leave open the possibility that some useful personal meaning can be extracted from them. The main purpose of dreams, however, the authors of the new study believe, is to test whether the brain has had enough sleep and, if so, to wake it up”, according to this article by Nicholas Wade in “The New York Times”.

13. Happiness Equals Love

George Vaillant explores and explains the data behind his finding that “The only thing that really matters inline are your relationships to other people”. From “Positive Psychology Daily News”, July 16, 2009.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: Positive Psychology Center

The Positive Psychology Center has extensive resources including summary of current research, sample syllabi, high school curriculum, online research participation, and extensive bibliography.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 6, February, 2012

February 15, 2012

Hello and welcome to the sixty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,395 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The big news this Valentine’s Day is that the APA filed briefs in the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals and the Montana Supreme Court that support the legal rights of same-sex couples. The brief drew on psychological research suggesting that forming intimate relationships and parenting healthy children is not bounded by sexual orientation.

Does being an introvert stink? This month, the meek shall inherit the earth … or at least four links in this month’s newsletter. Susan Cain’s just-released book ”Quiet: The Power of Introverts” has attracted quite a bit of media attention. In it, she suggests that there are advantages to being an introvert. Also, new research suggests that extroverts may bias self-report studies by their cheerfulness and — in one of those strange-but-true-studies — raters can accurately judge how outgoing or dominant people are from how they smell!

Finally, we discovered a series of articles in ”Psychology Today” which nearly doubles our size of resources on the topic of Narrative Psychology. We are always on the lookout for valuable resources, so if you have one you’d like to see us include, just send us the link!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. APA Files Two Briefs In Support of Same-Sex Couples

According to this press release, ”APA has filed two friend-of-the-court briefs–—one in the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals and one in the Montana Supreme Court–—that support the legal rights of same-sex couples. The cases are significantly different in their arguments before the court, but the briefs rely on the same social science research showing that homosexuality is a normal expression of human sexuality and that same-sex couples are not any less fit or capable than heterosexual parents and that their children are no less adjusted.”

3. Some Personality Traits Affect How You Smell

New research suggests that people can assess how outgoing, anxious, or dominant people are based on their body odor. Read the summary here in ”LiveScience”, December 2, 2011.

4. Are Extroverts Ruining Psychologists’ Surveys?

According to a recent study, ”Extroverts answer survey questions more enthusiastically than do introverts” Is their tendency towards hyperbole getting in the way of scientific objectivity? Do extroverts really experience the world more intensely, or are they just less hesitant to say so? Read all about it in this summary from ”LiveScience,” August 19, 2011.

5. Quiet: The Power of Introverts

Susan Cain, author of ”Quiet: The Power of Introverts” appeared recently on the radio program ”Radio Times” with host Marty Moss-Coane. From the website: ”In a world that celebrates the loudest, most outlandish, extroverted personalities, a new book makes the case for quieter types –– those who shy away from the limelight and who like to spend time alone. Writer Susan Cain says there are advantages to being an introvert, including being a reflective thinker and a good listener. Cain also highlights some well-known introverts like Mother Theresa, Rosa Parks, Joe DiMaggio, Bill Gates and Gandhi, who famously said, ”In a gentle way you can shake the world.” She tells Marty about the science behind introversion and the biases that shy people face.” Runs 49 minutes, 6 seconds, including calls from listeners.

6. Secrets of A Super Successful Introvert: How to (Quietly) Get Your Own Way

Susan Cain, author of ”Quiet: The Power of Introverts” describes her own personal realization of the power of introverts and explains why even social butterflies can benefit from drawing on their soft-spoken side. Includes 6 strategies for ”nourishing the unique strengths that come from your quieter reaches”. From ”O, The Oprah Magazine”, February 2012.

7. Reliability — The Foundation of Any Good Personality Test

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, broadcasts a podcast about psychology called ”The Psych Files”. In this video episode (Episode 168), he describes the concept of reliability in a concrete and enjoyable way through the classic, but invalid, Ice Cream Personality Test, the Distorted Tunes Test of musical perception, and a test of Achievement Motivation (runs 12 minutes, 6 seconds).

8. Validity — How Can You Tell a Good Test From a Bad One?

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, broadcasts a podcast about psychology called ”The Psych Files”. In this video episode (Episode 169), he describes the concept of validity in a concrete and enjoyable way through the classic, but invalid, Ice Cream Personality Test, the Distorted Tunes Test of musical perception, and others. ”High validity is what separates the many fun-to-take but essentially meaningless tests you’ll find on the web, and a truly solid test of your personality” (runs 14 minutes, 40 seconds).

9. Writing and Revising

Looking for a thorough writing guide for you or your students? ”Over the past 20 years of teaching, writing, and editing, I have compiled a set of tips, tricks, and pet peeves that I share with students and colleagues. I’ve decided to make this writing guide more widely available in case others will find it useful. The emphasis is on scientific writing, but the same principles apply to most non-fiction (including journalism).”

10. The Human Brain: Hardwired to Sin

Read about what neuroscientists have discovered about how the brain processes lust, gluttony, sloth, pride, wrath, and greed using brain scanning techniques. From ”Focus Magazine”, February 2012.

11. In Mental Illness, Women Internalize and Men Externalize

According to recent research, ”Women are more likely to develop anxiety and mood disorders such as depression, while men’s mental health issues are more likely to involve antisocial personality and substance abuse disorders.” Read the summary here in ”LiveScience”, August 19, 2011.

12. What Makes You Happy? It May Depend on Your Age

According to recent research, ”People’s happiness levels change with age, an idea reflected in personal experiences and public opinion polls, but a new study shows that much of that change may boil down to how people define happiness itself. Whereas happiness in younger people is often related to excitement, for older people, contentment was associated with a happy existence, the researchers found.” Read all about it in this summary from ”LiveScience,” August 2, 2011.

13. Facebook is Not Such a Good Thing for Those With Low Self-Esteem

”In theory, the social networking website Facebook could be great for people with low self-esteem. Sharing is important for improving friendships. But in practice, people with low self-esteem seem to behave counterproductively, bombarding their friends with negative tidbits about their lives and making themselves less likeable, according to a new study” in ”Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”ScienceDaily,” February 1, 2012.

14. Cloning Fido: Playing ”God” With ”Dog”

This brief episode from the ABC News program ”Night Line” describes how a woman had her beloved pet cloned by a South Korean company. With a high failure rate of clones and the questionable treatment of laboratory animals, the piece raises important questions, including: Do identical genes make for an identical dog? How are surrogate dogs treated after they give birth? Is it ethical to swap one animal’s life for another? Does the high number of failed attempts justify the few successful ones? Originally aired January 6, 2012 (runs 5 minutes, 48 seconds).

15. Powerful People Feel Taller Than They Really Are

According to research by Michelle Duguid and Jack Goncalo published in ”Psychological Science”, December 2011, participants assigned to act as a leader on experimental task increased their self-reported height by about an inch.

16. Self-Portrait in a Skewed Mirror

”You’re more than the star and author of your own life story. You’re also the spin master. How you tell your tale reveals whether you see yourself as victim or victor, even when your story veers from the life you lived”.
By Carlin Flora, for ”Psychology Today” (published on January 01, 2006 – last reviewed on January 18, 2012).

17. Your Life Story in Metaphors

Susan Krauss Whitbourne writes about the metaphors we use to describe our lives: ”Think about how you’ve gotten where you are in life, and where you hope or plan to go. What metaphor comes to mind? Does your life have a shape or a direction? Is it an arrow (upward or downward), a circle, or a series of steps? How about the life of other people you know? Is the metaphor you’d apply to yourself the same as those you’d apply to other people?” in this article from ”Psychology Today”, published May 3, 2011.

18. The Inside Story

”Telling stories is not just the oldest form of entertainment, it’s the highest form of consciousness. The need for narrative is embedded deep in our brains. Increasingly, success in the information age demands that we harness the hidden power of stories. Here’s what you need to know to tell a killer tale” in this story by Peter Guber, for ”Psychology Today”, (published on March 15, 2011 – last reviewed on January 23, 2012).

19. Why We Write

”Psychologists Jerome Bruner and Henri Zukier suggest that our minds have two general ways of taking in the world. When we perceive the world in paradigmatic mode, we act like scientists, connecting facts, looking for patterns and universal principles through which we categorize and understand our environment. The narrative mode on the other hand, is what allows us to endow life with meaning through the stories we tell about it.” Read about the power of writing our own narrative in this article by Mindy Greenstein for ”Psychology Today”, January 12, 2012.

20. A Winning Way to Get Started Writing Your Life Story

Susan Heitler provides this story-starting ideas to help you get in touch with your own life story. From ”Psychology Today”, January 18, 2012.

21. Are You The Star of Your Own Story?

Our lives are works in progress and masterpieces of story telling, so we should embrace our own biographies, according to Kim Schneiderman, in this article for ”Psychology Today”, January 2, 2012.

22. Who’s Writing Your Script? You May Be Surprised

Are you stuck in an ill-fitting role? A poorly written script? Self-reflection and questioning of where our scripts come from can help us to live more in line with our authentic selves according to this article by Kim Schneiderman for ”Psychology Today”, October 17, 2011.

23. Create Real Stories as Believable as Fiction

You can ”write more compelling creative non-fiction using novelist’s tricks” according to this article by Susan K. Perry for ”Psychology Today”, January 15, 2009.

24. Favorite Link Revisited: This Emotional Life

From the website: “The Emmy Award-winning team of Vulcan Productions and the producers of NOVA have created a three-part series that explores improving our social relationships, learning to cope with depression and anxiety, and becoming more positive, resilient individuals. Harvard psychologist and best-selling author of Stumbling on Happiness, Professor Daniel Gilbert, talks with experts about the latest science on what makes us tick and how we can find support for the emotional issues we all face. Each episode weaves together the compelling personal stories of ordinary people and the latest scientific research along with revealing comments from celebrities like Chevy Chase, Larry David, Alanis Morissette, Robert Kennedy, Jr., and Richard Gere. The first episode, Family, Friends & Lovers, looks at the importance of relationships and why they are central to our emotional well-being (includes an excellent overview of Attachment theory). In the second episode, Facing Our Fears, we look at emotions that are commonly regarded as obstacles to happiness — such as anger, fear, anxiety, and despair (includes a discussion of Anger, Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Stress and Anxiety). The last episode, Rethinking Happiness, explores happiness. It is so critical to our well-being, and, yet, it remains such an elusive goal for many of us” (includes Creativity and Flow, Forgiveness, Happiness, Humor, Meditation, Resilience). See more about the people and stories featured on the series, view selected video clips, learn more about the topics mentioned, find information about resources and support organizations, and purchase a DVD.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 2, October, 2011

October 18, 2011

Hello and welcome to the sixty-second Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,322 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we have a record number of links to share with you, everything from Arnold Schwarzenegger to Magic Mushrooms, with Jeopardy, comedians, laughter, narcissism, the upside of pessimism, and the very first mention of Sigmund Freud in ”The New York Times” in between.

Know somebody high in Neuroticism? This month we are pleased to bring you a rare upside to this trait: People high in Neuroticism tend to lose themselves in movies more than people low in Neuroticism. This means that they experience movies more richly, including both the positive emotions of happy and uplifting movies and the negative emotions of sad and scary movies.

While we’re on the topic of Neuroticism, while you may think of Woody Allen or Richard Lewis when it comes to neurotic comedians, it turns out that comedians are not higher in Neuroticism than non-comedians. They are, however, lower in Agreeableness and higher in Openness.

Speaking of Openness, people who have taken hallucinogenic mushrooms (!) do indeed experience more Openness. This bit of folk wisdom left over from the 1960s now has scientific backing. Further, this change in Openness may last up to a year later. Not that we’re advocating hallucinogens, but this study is sure to spark discussion in your classes about the ethics of research, how experience can change personality, and the consistency of personality over time.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Self-Promotion: Why Arnold’s Self-Statue Is Very Serious. Really.

Former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger unveiled a larger-than-life bronze statue of himself in his body-building days as part of a museum dedicated to Schwarzenegger in his hometown of Thal, Austria. Is this an example of egoism or merely the latest example of self-promotion harkening back to the ancients? From ”LiveScience”, October 2, 2011, by Stephanie Pappas.

3. Life’s Extremes: Early Bird vs. Night Owls

A good overview of circadian rhythm and the chronotypes of morning larks and night owls including genetic influences and sleep-phase disorders. From ”LiveScience”, October 2, 2011, by Adam Hadhazy.

4. Magic Mushrooms May Permanently Alter Personality

Even just one dose of hallucinogenic mushrooms can alter a person’s level of Openness for more than a year according to research by Katherine MacLean and colleagues as summarized in ”LiveScience”, September 29, 2011 by Stephanie Pappas.

5. Neurotics Experience More Immersion When Watching Films

People who score high in Neuroticism tend to feel more absorbed in films, both enjoying comedies more and horror and sad films less than people lower in Neuroticism. This, according to research by David Weibel and colleagues published this month in ”Personality and Individual Differences” and summarized here.

6. Neuroticism Influences Brain Activity During Anticipation and Experience of Pain

Neuroticism ”significantly affects brain processing during pain, as well as during the anticipation of pain”, according to a new study in ”Gastroenterology” and summarized here in ”ScienceDaily”, September 20, 2011.

7. Pessimism — It Could Save Your Mind

Summarizes research by O’Mara, McNulty, and Karney (2011) in the ”Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” which found that optimism led to increased mental health when participants were faced with less stressful situations, but that pessimism was more adaptive in the face of highly stressful situations. From ”Brain Blogger”, October 11, 2011 by Radhika Takru.

8. First Mention: Sigmund Freud, 1909

From the website: ”Sigmund Freud visited the United States only once, in 1909, to give a series of lectures. ”The New York Times” found nothing about the visit worth mentioning except his departure. ”Prof. Sigmund Freud” appears on Page 9 on Sept. 21, along with ”Dr. C. G. Jung,” in a list of passengers sailing to Bremen, Germany, aboard the Kaiser Wilhelm Der Grosse. It was the first time the newspaper mentioned his name […] A search of The Times database from the early 1920s until Freud’s death yields nearly 300 references to him and almost 1,000 to psychoanalysis. ”

9. How Not to Spot Personality Test Fakers

Can response times reveal test fakers? Maybe not. This notion was tested in research by Mindy Shoss and Michael Strube and summarized here in ”Research Digest”, September 14, 2011.

10. US Views on Gays, Lesbians, Shift Sharply

According to the 2010 update of the General Social Survey (GSS) at NORC at the University of Chicago, not only do a plurality of Americans approve of same-sex marriage, but they overwhelmingly support freedom of expression and basic civil liberties for gays and lesbians. This article summarizes these findings and includes two graphs which illustrate this trend toward increased tolerance over time.

11. Gender Non-Conformity in a Tide Ad

This ad depicts a mom who is exasperated at her daughter’s non-conformity with gender roles. While the mom tries to be supportive of her daughter’s non-traditional efforts, her obvious discomfort illustrates that gendered expectations for behavior still run strong.

12. It’s Ok to Be Neither: Teaching That Supports Gender-Variant Children

Melissa Bollow Tempel discusses her realization that just as gender training begins early, teaching about gender expectations and breaking down gender stereotypes should begin early as well. In this article Tempel describes how she changed her classroom to be more supportive of gender variance.

13.How to Get the Most Out of Studying

Stephen Chew, Samford University, created this series of 5 videos to help students. Grounded in his own research on using cognitive principles to improve teaching and learning, Chew presents basic principles of how people learn and tries to correct counterproductive beliefs so that students can improve their learning by designing their own effective study strategies and avoiding ineffective strategies.

14. Psychologists Discover A Gene’s Link to Optimism, Self-Esteem

According to research by Shelley E. Taylor and colleagues, and summarized here, researchers have identified a gene linked to optimism, self-esteem, and mastery. From ”Science Daily”, September 14, 2011.

15. Why We Dream

The BBC produced this video documentary on dreams: ”People who study dreaming to find out why we dream have found several potential answers: they help keep us asleep, they contribute to good mental health, and they help us find answers to questions we seek. But what do they mean, and can we control them? This excellent documentary interviews scientists, dreamers, and people with sleep and dream disorders to find out more about this always fascinating subject.” (Runs 58 minutes and 24 seconds).

16.Life’s Extremes: Outgoing vs. Shy

Summarizes research on early temperaments related to extraversion,  introversion, and shyness. Includes an excellent graphic summarizing these differences. From ”LifeScience”, September 25, 2011.

17. What’s On Your Genes?

Written for kids, this overview of genetics nonetheless does an excellent job of explaining Mendellian inheritance and epigenetics.

18. Goodness Has Nothing to Do With It

This article from ”The Economist” summarizes research by Daniel Bartels and David Pizzaro which suggests that people with a utilitarian outlook tend to be Machiavellian or psychopathic.

19. It’s All About Autonomy: Consumers React Negatively When Prompted to Think About Money

From the webpage: ”Whether they are aware of it or not, consumers dislike being reminded of money — so much that they will rebel against authority figures, according to a new study in the ”Journal of Consumer Research” and summarized here in ”ScienceDaily”, September 15, 2011.

20. Laughter is a Physical, Not a Mental Thing

From the summary: ”Laughter is regularly promoted as a source of health and well being, but it has been hard to pin down exactly why laughing until it hurts feels so good. The answer, reports Robin Dunbar, an evolutionary psychologist at Oxford, is not the intellectual pleasure of cerebral humor, but the physical act of laughing”. Read all about it here in ”3 Quarks Daily”, September 14, 2011.

21. Gender and the Narcissist

An overview of gender differences in narcissism and the finding that most narcissists are male.

22. Existential Therapy

An overview of existential theory and therapy as practiced by Rollo May and Irvin Yalom. Contains quotes, movie recommendations, training, comparisons with the humanistic tradition, and more.

23. The Strange Situation

Presents video of a mother and secure child going through Ainsworth’s Strange Situation. A voice over explains each part of the Strange Situation protocol, to which the baby reacts (runs 5 minutes and 24 seconds).

24. The Pursuit of Happiness

With the philosophy that happiness is ”understandable, obtainable, and teachable” this website presents a history of the philosophy of happiness and finding in the science of happiness along with teaching resources including syllabi, mini-lessons and PowerPoint presentations on the science and philosophy of happiness. They also welcome submissions.

25. Psychology Jeopardy

Stephen Wurst, SUNY Oswego, created these ”Jeopardy”-style games to use for review sessions with your classes. Boards are organized by theme and include: David Bowie Songs, Bruce Springsteen Songs, WordPlay, Broadway Musicals, Classic Jeopardy Categories, Dr. Strangelove and more. You play directly on the Super Teacher Tools website (see below) by choosing the number of teams and amount of time to answer questions. Correct answers are given and the site includes a scoreboard. See the Super Teacher Tools website (below) for a template you can use to make a Jeopardy review game with your own questions.

26. Super Teacher Tools

This site is ”dedicated to providing technology tools for teaching that are quick and easy to download, learn, and start using in your classroom.” Includes review games, classroom management software, and other miscellaneous tools for educators.

27. Personality: Funny in the Head

Does it take a special personality to be a stand-up comedian? Despite some notable exceptions, comedians are not more Neurotic than other people. They are, however, more Open to Experience and less Agreeable according to research by Gil Greengross and Geoffrey Miller summarized here.

28. Favorite Link Revisited: The Trait Paper Assignment

From the abstract: ”A personality trait-based term paper assignment that is appropriate for use in personality psychology courses and that is designed to foster critical thinking skills is introduced. The extent to which the trait questions correspond to generic critical thinking questions is considered, the specific thinking skills induced by each trait question are discussed, and potential limitations of the assignment are noted. Preliminary data are also presented which suggest that the trait-based term paper assignment stimulates critical thinking and enhances knowledge about personality traits. It is hoped that the ideas presented and issues discussed in the present article will encourage academic psychologists from all subdisciplines to develop writing assignments that foster critical thinking skills.” This assignment is not rooted in a particular model of traits and so is adaptable to any model. From Hittner, J. B. (1999). Fostering critical thinking in personalty psychology. ”Journal of Instructional Psychology”, 26, 92-97.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 1, September, 2011

September 23, 2011

Hello and welcome to the sixty-first Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,302 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy Birthday to the Personality Pedagogy newsletter! This month we are starting our 6th year. We have enjoyed brining you the latest in news, assignments, activities, examples and more. We thank you, our loyal readers and visitors, for making Personality Pedagogy the place to go for resources for teaching personality psychology. Don’t you feel like sending us a birthday card now? (see the third link below)

Science or science fiction? One of the most interesting pieces of news this month is a new study out of UC Berkeley which was able to reconstruct the ”movies” inside of our heads — like dreams and memories — from fMRIs and computer modeling. This is a very exciting breakthrough and one that, while not directly related to personality psychology, illustrates cutting-edge research in neuroscience these days. It is just a matter of time before this technique will be used to study personality and the brain.

Permit us a moment of shameless self-promotion. This month we are pleased to announce a new textbook for personality psychology written by our own editor, Marianne Miserandino. ”Personality Psychology: Foundations and Findings” (Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2012) introduces students to the basic foundations and latest findings in personality psychology by presenting the fundamental questions, accumulated knowledge, and latest research in traits, genetics, neuroscience, self and identity, intrapsychic aspects, regulation and motivation, and cognition, as well as the integration across these areas. The book is written specifically for students at small liberal arts and community colleges. The best part of all is that Miserandino wrote the instructor’s manual too! The IM is chock full of discussion points, active learning exercises, self-assessments, crossword puzzle vocabulary reviews, and much more gleaned from her almost 20 years of teaching personality psychology at Arcadia University. If you like Personality Pedagogy, you are sure to love this new approach to teaching personality psychology. Check it out here.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Scientists Use fMRI to Reveal the Movies in Our Mind

Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and computational models, UC Berkeley researchers Jack Gallant and colleagues have succeeded in decoding and reconstructing people’s dynamic visual experiences – in this case, watching Hollywood movie trailers, according to this summary and published September 22 2011 in the journal ”Current Biology”. Includes excerpts from the actual movies participants viewed alongside images recreated from their brain scans.

3. The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook

Mike Masnick discusses an ”experiment” conducted by David Plotz of ”Slate” magazine. Plotz noted that well-wishers responded automatically when they saw that a friend was having a birthday on Facebook.

4. Bobby McFerrin’s ”Don’t Worry, Be Happy”: An Explication Grounded in Research

Maria Popova presents this explication of the ”iconic happiness anthem” grounded in the latest research in personality and social psychology. Includes links to original sources.

5. The Use of Active Imagination in Jungian Sandplay

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #278, September 9, 2011). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Maria Hess, Ph.D., a Jungian Analyst who teaches Sonoma State University. Maria teaches, practices and presents workshops in sandplay and other non-verbal expressive modalities.

6. Carl Jung: Psychology’s Magician

According to Algis Valiunas, in ”The New Atlantis”, ”… Newton was not the last magician. Jung was. The method of his analytical psychology — as he called it, to distinguish it from Freudian psychoanalysis — was nothing short of fantastic.” [For example] ”[t]o penetrate the psyche of a woman destined for schizophrenic disintegration, he would study dreams, reveries, her ”borderland phenomena” — the apparitions that came to her as she was half-asleep — and explicate them in the light of Mithraic religious symbols, Old Testament wisdom, the words of Jesus, passages from Shakespeare, poems by Nietzsche, Teutonic and Persian and Chinese and Indian legend… Although Jung focuses intently on a particular patient with a particular disorder, his study has a far more extensive cultural reach. He was out to dethrone arid modern scientism and restore the symbolic imagination — which is to say, religious feeling — to its rightful place in the life of men.”

7. Contingencies of Self-Worth Scale

From Crocker, J., Luhtanen, R. K., Cooper, M. L., & Bouvrette, A. (2003). Contingencies of self-worth in college students: Theory and measurement. ”Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85”, 894-908. Includes background information, limitations, scale validity, scoring instructions and links to the scale in English, Japanese, Spanish, German, Dutch, French, and Turkish.

8. Wounded Warriors Softball Team

NBC Nightly News did this feature story on the inspirational Wounded Warriors softball team. These veteran service members play on an amputee softball team, made up entirely of players who have lost limbs. They take on able-bodied teams for camaraderie and the love of good hard competition. Aired September 5, 2011 (Runs 3 minutes and 28 seconds).

9. Nonexperimental Methods

Mark Mitchell, Clarion University, provides this extensive overview of nonexperimental methods including quizzes to test your comprehension of the material presented.

10. Core Concepts in Neuroscience

The Society for Neuroscience sponsors this extensive website filled with useful and up-to-date resources including a downloadable e-book on the core concepts of neuroscience and a matching Powerpoint presentation.

11. Neuroscience Education Resources Virtual Encycloportal (NERVE)

The Society for Neuroscience sponsors the website NERVE, the Neuroscience Education Resources Virtual Encycloportal. Built for instructors of k-12, the site is organized around the themes of addictions, drugs, and the brain; anatomy; cells; sensation, perception and movement; mental health, brain disorders, and disease; nervous system injuries; brain basics; and neuroscientists at work. Filled with activities, cases, fact sheets, images, experiences, quizzes, simulations and much more, many of which are easily tailored to the level of high school and college audiences.

12. Finding Little Albert

Michael Britt created an episode for his podcast, ”The Psych Files,” which discusses the curious story of how Little Albert, one of the most famous subjects in the history of psychology, was finally found. In this video episode (#114) Britt takes us through each step of the extensive and fascinating detective work which led to Albert’s identity. Includes some never seen before pictures.

13. The Little Albert Study: What You Know is Mostly Wrong

Michael Britt created an episode for his podcast, ”The Psych Files,” which discusses the real story behind Little Albert, one of the most famous subjects in the history of psychology. In this episode (#47) Britt explains, ”If you think you know a lot about the little Albert experiment conducted by John Watson? Well, guess what – you’d be surprised at how much of the story is simply not true. If you’re wondering whatever happened to little Albert, whether the little Albert study created a lasting phobia in a small boy, or even what place this story has in the history of behaviorism, then I suggest you take a listen to this episode of The Psych Files and get the facts on this fascinating part of psychology’s history.”

14. Twins

In August 1997 the magazine ”Psychology Today” ran this summary of twin research and the misperceptions of twin research written by twin researcher Nancy Segal and colleagues.

15. Celebrating Diversity in Schools

Celebrating Diversity in Schools provides a range of resources for teachers, parents and others who work with young people to help make schools more supportive and inclusive for same sex attracted and transgender young people and staff. Their website contains training resources, materials, activities, handouts, references and more.

16. Sexual Trichotomy: Understanding the Fluidity of Sexuality and Gender

One of the many activities featured on the Celebrating Diversity website is this trichotomy of sexual identity, sexual behavior, and sexual orientation. Students discuss how this trichotomy might apply to 6 hypothetical people and in the process discover how sexuality is fluid and how a person’s identity, orientation and behavior can change throughout life.

17. Heterosexual Privilege

The Student Counseling Center at Texas Tech University features a number of activities, handouts and other resources on their website. In this activity, students answer 32 questions that illustrate heterosexual privilege in ways straight people do not have to think about. For example, questions range from ”I can, if I wish, legally marry my life partner” to ”My sexual orientation is represented in the media and I don’t feel excluded”.

18. Assessing Assumptions About Gender

This exercise by Amy Taylor won Honorable Mention for the 2009 Social Psychology Network Action Teaching Award. In this activity, students read a dialog between a man and a woman and report their impressions of the characters. Half the class have the genders of the characters switched. According to Taylor, the objectives of this activity are to: (1) illustrate how subtle gender biases can influence social perceptions, (2) help students recognize their own implicit assumptions about gender, and (3) explore the implications these biases may have for gender equality.

19. Teach Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website as a companion to their Learn.Genetics website. Here you will find classroom activities to teach the basics of heritable traits and take-home activities to help students share what they’ve learned with their families. PDFs are available for download including instructions, student worksheets, overhead masters, and answer keys. Some of the material may be too basic for a college class (although the graphics which review the basics of inheritance would make an excellent review), the topics do include Epigenetics, gene therapy, personalized medicine, cloning, and other fairly sophisticated topics. Most of the activities can be modified to fit the needs of your students and the topic of personality.

For example, there is an activity to create a DNA recipe to create dog by randomly selecting strips of paper that represent DNA. Though the activity is recommended for grades 5-10 some of the advanced discussion points are applicable, or at least a good review for a personality psychology class. The ”Your Environment, Your Epigenome” activity, where students record some of the epigenome-influencing factors present in their environment, is suitable for high school and college classes.

20. Learn Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website to disseminate educational materials on genetics, bioscience, and health. Includes animations to teach the basics of DNA, genes, heredity and traits, and more.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: Jung Speaks

PsicoMundo, a Spanish language website about psychoanalysis, has two audio clips in their Galería de Sonidos (Gallery of Sounds) of Carl Jung speaking (the clips are in English). Fragmento 1 (Fragment 1) is 16 seconds, Fragmento 2 (Fragment 2) is 23 seconds. They are available for listening (para escuchar) on line or off line.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 12, August, 2011

August 31, 2011

Hello and welcome to the sixtieth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,282 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are pleased to bring you an eclectic collection of links from sexism and heterosexism to your brain and your awkward friends. Many of the links below are to summaries of the latest research in personality psychology, most of which has been published this month.

We’ve been doing some housecleaning of sorts this month, painstakingly reviewing every link on the entire site, removing broken links, and updating old links. This is a big job, as you might imagine, so if you find a broken link or have a new link to suggest please let us know.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Too Pretty to Do Homework?

This summer, JC Penny offered a t-shirt for sale for girls which read ”I’m too pretty to do homework so my brother has to do it for me”. Adding insult to injury was the caption next to the photo of the shirt: ”Who has time for homework when there’s a new Justin Bieber album out? She’ll love this tee that’s just as cute and sassy as she is.” Due to public outcry, sale of the shirt was discontinued as delivering an inappropriate and sexist message.

3. Your Most Awkward Friends May Save Your Life

Your insecure and anxious friends may be better that your secure friends at detecting impending danger and acting quickly according to research by Tsachi Ein-Dor and colleagues, and summarized here in ”LiveScience”, August 17, 2011.

4. Narcissism May Benefit the Young, Researchers Report; But Older Adults? Not So Much

A new study suggests that some forms of narcissism may be beneficial — at least in the short term — for making the transition into adulthood. This, according to research by Patrick Hill and Brent Roberts, published this month in ”Social Psychological and Personality Science” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, August 11, 2011.

5. Review Highlights Flawed Logic of Segregating Boys and Girls for Education Purposes, Based on Alleged Brain Differences

When it comes to learning and education, neuroscience has identified few reliable differences between boys’ and girls’ brains. There is no scientific basis for teaching boys and girls separately according to a review by Lise Eliot published this month in ”Sex Roles” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, August 18, 2011.

6. Teaching Research Methods

Jeff Standen conducted a workshop in 2010 at the ATP Conference on Teaching Psychology. This page contains links to his PowerPoint slides with suggestions for teaching research methods, a research methods mindmap, a PowerPoint-based experiment you can do with your class, PowerPoint slides on correlation, an overview of psychological research methods, levels of measurement, and notes on reliability and validity and much more.

7. Resources for Teaching Neuroscience

Jeff Standen compiled these resources for teaching neuroscience including PowerPoint slides on neurons, the brain and brain research and much more.

8. Evolution and Genetics

Jeff Standen shares his PowerPoint slides on natural selection and genetics.

9. Psychlotron.org.uk

Psychlotron.org.uk is a website of teaching resources for teachers and lecturers. Though aimed at those teaching introductory psychology in the British system, there are many free resources here applicable to those teaching personality psychology including this unit on Freud and Personality.

10. Who Am I? Your Brain

The Science Museum of National Museum of Science and Industry (NMSI), London, UK sponsors an extensive website. Check out their interactive online exhibit on ”Who Am I?” featuring videos, pictures, handouts, and information on understanding your body, your brain, and your genes. This page on ”Your Brain” answers the questions how can illness affect the brain, what happens when you are asleep, how do drugs affect the brain, what are emotions, and others.

11. Who Am I? Your Genes

The Science Museum of National Museum of Science and Industry (NMSI), London, UK sponsors an extensive website. Check out their interactive online exhibit on ”Who Am I?” featuring videos, pictures, handouts, and information on understanding your body, your brain, and your genes. This page on ”Your Genes” answers the questions where did your genes come from, what was the Human Genome project, how do genes affect your health, and others.

12. Attributional Styles Test and Locus of Control

Discovery Health presents this online version of a 10-item locus of control scale with scoring and feedback. However, the real fun begins when you are asked to take the 47-item long version including scales measuring optimistic and pessimistic explanatory style, the three dimensions of internal-external, stable-unstable, global-specific, career and academic locus of control, belief in luck, health locus of control and more. All scales are scored automatically and feedback is provided.

13. Probe the Brain

PBS presents this site where you pretend you are a brain surgeon and get to virtually map out the brain’s motor cortex.

14. MRI — The Magnetic Miracle Game

NobelPrize.org, the official site of the Nobel prize, presents this interactive game which illustrates how an MRI works, why metal can not be near the apparatus, and how does MRI compare to x-ray and CAT images.

15. Brain Facts

The society for neuroscience provides this free 74-page primer on the brain and nervous system designed as an introduction to neuroscience for a lay audience.

16. Heal Thyself: Think Positive

Realism may be bad for your health: believing things will turn out fine or feeling safe and secure may help the body maintain and repair itself according to research by David Creswell and colleagues reviewed in this summary and video (3 minutes, 5 seconds) from ”New Scientist”, August 29, 2011.

17. Multicultural Teaching

The Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan sponsors this page of information and strategies for multicultural teaching. Everything from course planning, teaching social justice,  to responding to difficult decisions, and instructor identity.

18. Store Dresses Down Bride for Being a Lesbian

Yet another illustration of the ignorant and often negative attitudes that non-heterosexual people face. A bridal shop owner refuses to sell a woman a wedding dress because she didn’t want to be associated with an impending ”illegal action”, i.e., her marriage to another woman.

19. The Five Factors

Erica Melkonian put this montage together as an independent study project in her AP Psychology class in May of 2011. In it, she defines and illustrates people who are high and low on each of the five factors including the famous and infamous like Curious George and Adolph Hitler (3 minutes, 38 seconds).

20. Sam Gosling: Snoop: The Secret Language of Stuff

Gosling, author of Snoop, presents an overview of his research to the Commonwealth Club of California in this video. Topics include creativity and openness, Facebook profiles, faking a personal space, and much more. The site includes a biography of Gosling, highlights of the talk, transcript, and the entire talk (1 hour, 7 minutes).

21. Favorite Link Revisited: George Boeree of Shippensburg University

George Boeree should win some sort of award for the ”giving away” of psychology and resources for teaching psychology. He has written electronic textbooks in Personality Theories and General Psychology as well as for Social Psychology, History of Psychology, Qualitative Methods, and Buddhism, and has made them all freely available on the Internet. Thank you George, for all you do to help us teach and learn better!