Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 4, December 2015

December 17, 2015

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Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,256  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Just a quick update with some links for this month. We know that some of you are finishing up a semester while others are planning the semester ahead, while others are just carrying on in the New Year!

To all of you, we wish you a peaceful holiday season and all the best in 2016!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Just two questions predict how well a pilot will handle an emergency
“A new study reports that, more than relevant facts such as age and years of experience, pilots’ answers to two simple questions can more accurately forecast how they will respond to a stressful situation.” These questions help to determine whether the pilot views the situation as a challenge or as a threat. Published in “Anxiety, Stress, & Coping” and summarized here for BPS Research Digest, July 7, 2015.

3. Your personality can invite loneliness, and loneliness can shape your personality
According to new research, “it appears our personality affects the likelihood that we’ll become more lonely (and feel less well) as we get older, but also that being lonely (and feeling less healthy) shapes our personality, potentially setting up a vicious circle of isolation”. Published in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for BPS Research Digest, July 21, 2015.

4. Is Your Brain Male or Female?
Writer Veronica Pamoukaghlian reviews neuroscience investigating possible gender differences in brain form and function. Posted June 6, 2015.

5. Why You Should Be True to Yourself
New research by Maryam Kouchaki and her colleagues finds that feeling inauthentic is related to what it means to be a moral person. Published in Psychological Science and summarized here for PsyBlog, June 11, 2015.

6. How To Be Content When Your Life Feels Out of Control
According to new research “In the survey of over 500 people, the researchers found that both primary and secondary control were linked to positive emotions. Only primary control, though, was linked to negative emotions.” Published in “Social Psychological and Personality Science” and summarized here for PsyBlog,June 8, 2015.

7. This personality trait may get you hired — but it won’t necessarily get you promoted
While agreeable people are well-liked by their colleagues and being cooperative, flexible, tolerant, and forgiving can help you land a job, this trait may not help one advance their career. From “Business Insider”, June 4, 2015.

8. Favorite Link Revisited: Chimpanzees’ Personas Seem More Complex Than People’s
Using the same techniques as the early (human) trait theorists did, Hani Freeman and her colleagues found evidence that chimpanzee personality consists of 6 dimensions. These include extroversion, agreeableness and openness, shared by humans, but also reactivity (related to the human trait of neuroticism, perhaps?), dominance and methodicalness which are not. Their research was published in the American Journal of Primatology and summarized here in The Economist, June 15, 2013.

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 7, March, 2013

March 26, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,752 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

One-hundred and eight years ago today psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl was born in Austria. This would be a good time to reflect upon the lessons on finding meaning Frankl presented in his moving book “Man’s Search for Meaning”. Our first link is to a very moving summary of the book in words and pictures by Maria Popova for her “Brain Pickings” blog.

There are two sides to every story, and this month we present you with the pros and cons of a new initiative endorsed by President Obama this month: The Brain Activity Map. The goal is that neuroscientists will join their efforts to map areas of the brain the way scientists decoded the human genome a few years back. But is it even possible to identify all of the areas of brain function, and is localization even the best way to understand brain functioning? See the links below for more on this controversial proposal.

Speaking of the other side to stories, check out the softer side of B. F. Skinner. Thanks to Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” we have links and sound clips of Skinner discussing compassion, music, a love of reading and other topics. Britt argues that Skinner and his theories are more complicated than you might have first thought.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Happy Birthday, Viktor Frankl: Timeless Wisdom on the Human Search for Meaning

In recognition of Viktor Frankl’s birthday, science writer Maria Popova summarizes Frankl’s theory and how we create meaning out of purposeful work, love, and courage in the face of difficulty, using excerpts from his work and photos of Frankl and others.

3. Brain Activity Map Proponents Explain Goals of Blood Neuroscience

Science writer Stephanie Pappas explains “Neuroscientists are pushing for a major project that would map the activity of the brain, potentially illuminating the causes of depression, schizophrenia and other major mental health disorders” in this article from “LiveScience”, March 7, 2013.

4. What’s Wrong With the Brain Activity Map Proposal

“With the president suggesting a multibillion-dollar neuroscience effort, a leading neuroscientist explains the deep conceptual problems with plans to record all the brain’s neurons” in this article by Partha Mitra in “Scientific American”, from March 5, 2013.

5. What Was B.F. Skinner Really Like?

According to Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast, “Would you be surprised to learn that B.F. Skinner was a very likable guy and that you may actually be very much in agreement with his ideas? Many people who study psychology have a negative impression of Skinner. Well, I’m about to challenge those impressions by presenting a side of Skinner you probably haven’t been exposed to. In these sound bytes you’ll hear his ideas about learning to play music, about discovery, having fun and becoming the most that you can be.” From episode 191 posted March 11, 2013 (runs 32 minutes, 35 seconds).

6. Skinner on Compassionate Behavior

Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast presents this audio clip of B.F. Skinner on compassion: “Listen to B. F. Skinner as he explains how he believes we can get people to be more compassionate as they deal with old people, prisoners, psychiatric patients and the developmentally delayed (which in his day were referred to commonly as ‘retardates’). Note that he is more in favor of rewarding positive behavior than in implementing ‘aversive controls’ also note that he speaks of how important knowledge is in treating people with these needs” (runs 2 minutes, 31 seconds).

7. Skinner on Learning to Love Reading

Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast presents this audio clip of B. F. Skinner talking about reading. “In another surprisingly “humanistic” interview with B.F. Skinner he discusses what he thinks we can do to make learning to read fun. ‘Fun’? and ‘Skinner’? Yup. There are more sides to Skinner than we sometimes think about after we’ve had only a basic course in psychology” (runs 3 minutes and 31 seconds).

8. Skinner on Learning to Play Music

Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast presents this audio clip of B.F. Skinner talking about learning to play music. As Britt explains, Skinner “has, unfortunately, suffered from a bad reputation. Listen to how he explains his own experiences learning to play the piano and his suggestions for how children might come to love playing music if we introduce it into their lives correctly. If you didn’t know it was his voice you probably wouldn’t guess this was him speaking” (runs 1 minute, 40 seconds).

9. Gender Trouble

Summarizes the work of Judith Butler who argues that gender identity is a social construction.

10. The Bechdel Test For Media Bia

According to the Feminist Frequency website by media critic Anita Sarkeesian: “The Bechdel Test is a simple way to gauge the active presence of female characters in Hollywood films and just how well rounded and complete those roles are. It was created by Allison Bechdel in her comic strip ‘Dykes to Watch Out For’ in 1985”. The test is: (1) Does the film have at least two [named or otherwise central character] women in it, (2) who talk to each other, (3) about something besides a man? (runs 2 minutes, 3 seconds). You and your students can use this test to see how popular movies, especially those winning Oscars or other top awards, fare. See here for a discussion of similar tests for other types of bias in the media.

11. Humanistic Theory and Therapy Applied to the Psychotic Individual

Ann Reitan describes how therapy in general, and humanistic therapy in particular, can be helpful to a psychotic person. Focusing on the theory and techniques of Carl Rogers, and especially his notions of conditions of worth and unconditional positive regard, she describes how therapy could help a person with schizophrenia.

12. The Stories That Bind Us

Writer Bruce Feiler describes research which suggests that the stories families tell about themselves inspire resilience in future generations. From “The New York Times”, March 15, 2013.

13. How You Can Be a Better Storyteller

Eric Barker, of the “Barking Up The Wrong Tree” blog presents this interview with UCLA Film School Professor Howard Suber. Along the way, Suber reveals the power of a narrative to define — and change — our lives. Posted March 4, 2013.

14. Can People’s Personalities Change?

“Instead of personality being set in stone at 30, now evidence is emerging that there is some change. In fact people don’t give exactly the same answers to personality questionnaires at different times in their lives” according to research by Boyce et al., published in “Social Indicators Research” and summarized here in “PsyBlog”, February 25, 2013.

15. World of Warcraft: Why People Play is Linked to their Personality

John Grohol reviews research by Graham and Gosling (2013) which found that people play “World of Warcraft” for different reasons linked to their personality and that the experience of playing is different for people depending on their levels of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. Posted March 18, 2013.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: “I Was Not A Lab Rat”

Deborah Skinner’s essay about growing up as the baby in the box.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 8, April, 2012

April 22, 2012

Hello and welcome to the sixty-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,495 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, we welcome a new site for teachers of psychology: Making Connections. Funded by a grant from the Association for Psychological Science (APS) Fund for Teaching and Public Understanding of Psychological Science, Susan Goldstein established this site ”to provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum.” The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources; pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies; and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues. Check it out at http://makingconnections.redlands.edu.

Also this month, we just discovered — and perhaps you are ahead of us in this — a photo stream on Flickr posted by ”Psychology Pictures”. This stream features graphics of thought-provoking psychology-related quotes printed over striking photos. The result are some very inspiring images that will liven up a slide presentation, a web site, or even your office door. The site also features photos of famous psychologists, should you be looking for one of those.

Finally, for those of you who could use some comic relief at this point in the semester that happens to be personality-related, check out http://make-everything-ok.com/. This ”button” promises to make everything better, but just in case it doesn’t, it urges you to check your perceptions, a good entree into the cognitive perspective with your students.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Making Connections

Susan Goldstein of the University of Redlands established and maintains this site to: ”provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum.” The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources; pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies; and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues.

3. Psychology Pictures Photostream on Flickr

This Flickr photostream features graphics of thought-provoking psychology-related quotes printed over striking photos. The result are some very inspiring images that will liven up a slide presentation, a web site, or even your office door. The site also features photos of famous psychologists.

4. Childhood Adversity Can Lead to Genetic Changes

”Childhood adversity may lead to epigenetic changes in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene, an important regulator of the biological stress response that may increase risk for psychiatric disorders” according to research published in ”PLoS ONE” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, February 29, 2012.

5. Helping Children to Succeed

”Children may perform better in school and feel more confident about themselves if they are told that failure is a normal part of learning, rather than being pressured to succeed at all costs” according to research published in the ”Journal of Experimental Psychology” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, March 13, 2012.

6. Self-Regulation: Video Talk by Roy Baumeister

Roy Baumeister presents this talk to the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, an organization committed to finding innovative practical solutions to today’s social challenges, explaining why ”willpower and self-control is one of the most important aspects of individual and societal wellbeing” (runs 15 minutes and 50 seconds).

7. Carl Jung’s Five Key Elements to Happiness

In 1960, when asked by a journalist, ”What do you consider to be more or less basic factors making for happiness in the human mind?”, Jung identified these five elements.

8. A Jungian Approach to Fairy Tales

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #293, February 3, 2012). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Tom Elsner about fairy tales and their interpretation from a Jungian perspective.

9. The Situation of Ability: Gender Differences in Mental Rotation Deconstructed

In this article by Scott Barry Kaufman from the ”Huffington Post” (1/9/2012) he takes a look at the standard mental rotation task and considers the role of spatial ability, expectations, confidence, and stereotype threat on gender differences in this ability.

10. Revising Your Story

Social psychologist Tim Wilson argues that a better way of changing behavior may be ”to try to get inside [people’s] heads and understand how they see the world—the stories and narratives they tell themselves” according to this article in the American Psychological Association ”Monitor on Psychology”, March 2012, volume 43, number 3, p. 28.

11. Self-Determination Theory: Tips to Keeping New Year’s Resolutions

According to Ed Deci ”the best way to keep on track with your goals for the new year is to think hard about why you’re pursuing them”.

12. The Happy Secret to Better Work

From the website: ”We believe that we should work to be happy, but could that be backwards? In this fast-moving and entertaining talk from TEDxBloomington, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that actually happiness inspires productivity.” (Runs 12 minutes, 21 seconds)

13. Royalty-free Images From the United States Government

Librarians at SUNY Albany put together this list of links to collections of images from the United States Government which may be free to use. They include Federal photo collection, NASA and NOAA images, National Park Service photos and much more (opens in PDF format).

14. Reflections on Carl Rogers

According to the website: ”Digging into the history of psychological science, the Observer has retrieved classic interviews with prominent psychological scientists for an ongoing series Psychology (Yesterday and) Today. Each interview is introduced by a contemporary psychological scientist, and the full text of the interview is available on the Observer website. We invite you to reflect on the words of these legendary scientists, and decide whether their voices still resonate with the science of today.”

15. Exuberance for Novelty Has Benefits

”Novelty-seeking is one of the traits that keeps you healthy and happy and fosters personality growth as you age,” says psychiatrist C. Robert Cloninger, ”It can lead to antisocial behavior … but if you combine this adventurousness and curiosity with persistence … then you get the kind of creativity that benefits society as a whole.”  Read more about novelty-seeking in this article by John Tierney in ”The New York Times”, February 13, 2012.

16. The Strange Tale of Phineas Gage

Joanna Schaffhausen describes the fascinating case of Phineas Gage who had a change in personality as a result of a traumatic brain injury.

17. Eight Ways That Money Can Buy Happiness

Eric Barker summarizes the thinking of Daniel Gilbert on what does and does not make us happy in this list of ways that money, contrary to a popular adage, really can buy us happiness, if spent the right way.

18. Want to Be Happier Right Now? The Think Positive! Experiment

Reflecting on the 3 best events over the course of a week, as opposed to the three worst, colors our overall judgement of how the week was.

19. ”I Love Me!”: A Q&A About Narcissism

Psychotherapist Samuel López De Victoria presents this overview of Narcissism to answer people’s most often asked questions. From ”Psych Central” blog, April 18, 2012.

20. Favorite Link Revisited:

Jonathan Mueller at North Central College, in Naperville, Illinois, put together the extensive website (and newsletter!) Resources for Teaching Social Psychology. Check out his resources for teaching the Self as well as other topics related to both personality psychology and social psychology.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 9, May, 2011

May 30, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,235 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy unofficial start of summer!

Ah, is there anything as glorious as being curled up with a good book on a summer’s day? If you love summer reading (especially fiction) and already have a stack of titles awaiting your attention, you’ll be interested to know that what you always suspected is true: Reading fiction like ”Twilight” or ”Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” for just 30 minutes can make people feel like they are part of an entirely different world. Researchers found that not only does this feel good, as any young Harry Potter fan can attest to, but it also changes us. Read all about it in our second link below. And dust off your library card, Kindle, or beloved old favorites from your shelves and get busy exploring new worlds . . . and yourself! But don’t stay up too late, as sleep deprivation has its own problems as you can read below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. We Actually ‘Become’ Happy Vampires or Contented Wizards When Reading a Book
”[R]eading satisfies a deeply felt need for human connection because we not only feel like the characters we read about but, psychologically speaking, become part of their world and derive emotional benefits from the experience” according to research by Shira Gabriel and Ariana Young, published this month in ”Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, May 10, 2011.

3. Over 40 Playful Yet Practical Ways to Cultivate Creativity
Margarita Tartakovsky presents these ways to boost creativity to make you happier and more productive. From ”Psych Central”.

4. From the Beginning, the Brain Knows the Difference Between Night and Day
“The brain is apparently programmed from birth to develop the ability to determine sunrise and sunset, [according to] new research on circadian rhythms” by August Kampf-Lassin and Brian Prendergast and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, April 28, 2011.

5. Snooze Control: Fatigue, Air Traffic and Safety
Richard R. Bootzin presented his paper ”If Sleep is So Important, Why Do We Get So Little of It?” at the 23rd Annual APS Convention earlier this month. Read about his work inspired by some recent notable near-misses of aircraft due to fatigued air traffic controllers. The problem is not with individuals but with the recovery time between shifts for shift workers according to this summary from ”Science Daily”, April 25, 2011.

6. Peak Experiences: Big Moments
”Life can drone along at a hum for years—then break into a short but glorious chorus that changes us forever. It’s impossible to predict such peak experiences; in fact, that’s part of their charm. But it is possible to prepare for them” as Rebecca Webber explains in this article from ”Psychology Today,” September 01, 2010.

7. 10 Quick Stress Busters
Therese Borchard, editor at ”Psych Central”, has 10 tips for dealing with stress (e.g., simplify, prioritize, laugh, exercise, etc.). Borchard readily admits that she uses an average of 5 per day, and as much as all 10 on a truly bad day.

8. The Healing Power of Laughter
Theresa Borchard outlines the stress-busting and healing power of laughter in this essay from ”Psych Central”.

9. The Psychology of Cells
”New techniques are allowing researchers to measure how the environment affects gene expression, leading to some remarkable insights, including the finding that loneliness primes the immune system to turn on its inflammatory response — a risk factor for disease.” according to research summarized in this article by Beth Azar for the APA ”Monitor”, May 2011.

10. 7 Tips for Giving Effective Praise
Gretchen Rubin distills much of the research on praise to these 7 tips including be specific, be sincere, and more, in this article from ”Psych Central”.

11. Happiness Has A Dark Side
”It seems like everyone wants to be happier and the pursuit of happiness is one of the foundations of American life. But even happiness can have a dark side […] people who strive for happiness may end up worse off than when they started” according to research by June Gruber, Iris Mauss and Maya Tamir published this month in ”Perspectives on Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, May 17, 2011.

12. What Does Your Handshake Say About You?
While not exactly a window into the soul, handshakes do play an important part in generating a first impression. People can accurately judge a target’s extraversion and, for men only, conscientiousness, from a handshake. Given that consciousness is an effective predictor of success at work, both men and women may want to think about the impression their handshakes create, according to research by Frank Bernieri and Kristen Petty published this month in ”Social Influence” and summarized here in The British Psychological Society’s ”Research Digest”, May 13, 2011.

13. Why Extroverts are the Happiest People
”Extroverts are the cheeriest personality type, and a new study finds that the root of their happiness may be in their memories. People who are extroverted remember the past in a more positive light than other personality types” according to new research by Ryan Howell, as summarized in this article from ”Life Science”, May 3, 2011.

14. Psychologists Discover We’ve Been Underestimating the Unconscious Mind
Neurologists and cognitive psychologists once believed that we need awareness for integration of stimuli into a coherent whole. However, ”integration can happen even when we’re unaware of the stimulus […] Unconscious processes are much more sophisticated and deeper than was previously believed” according to research by Liad Mudrik, Dominique Lamy, Assaf Breska, and Leon Y. Deouell published in ”Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”Medical Xpress”, May 12, 2011.

15. I Control Therefore I am: Chimps Self-Aware
”Chimpanzees are self-aware and can anticipate the impact of their actions on the environment around them, an ability once thought to be uniquely human” according to research by Takaaki Kaneko and Masaki Tomonaga and summarized here in PhysOrg.Com, May 4, 2011.

16. Think It’s Easy to Be Macho? Psychologists Show How ‘Precarious’ Manhood Is
”Manhood is a “precarious” status — difficult to earn and easy to lose. And when it’s threatened, men see aggression as a good way to hold onto it” according to research by Jennifer K. Bosson and Joseph A. Vandello, published in ”Current Directions in Psychological Science”, and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, May 3, 2011.

17. When Self-Esteem Is Threatened, People Pay With Credit Cards
”People shop for high status items when they’re feeling low, and they’re more likely to make those expensive purchases on credit”, according to a study in ”Social Psychological and Personality Science” by Niro Sivanathan and Nathan Pettit and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, May 6, 2011.

18. Scientists Find Genetic Link to Depression
”Scientists say they have discovered the first solid evidence that variations in some peoples’ genes may cause depression […] And in a rare occurrence in genetic research, a British-led international team’s finding of a DNA region linked to depression has been replicated by another team from the United States who were studying an entirely separate group of people,” ”Reuters”, May 16, 2011.

19. Happiness Gene Located
”A gene which regulates the movement of serotonin in the brain has been labeled the “happiness gene” by researchers from the London School of Economics and reported in the ”Journal of Human Genetics”. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct link between an individual’s happiness and a specific genetic condition” according to research by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, May 7, 2011.

20. Song Lyrics Suggest Narcissism Is On the Rise
Nathan DeWall and his colleagues ”analyzed the lyrics of songs on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart from 1980 to 2007. They found a statistically significant trend toward narcissism in the music, with the words “I” and “me” gradually replacing “we” and “us.”” Read about his work in this article from ”Life Science”, April 26, 2011.

21. Activity: The Soundtrack of Your Life
Describes an activity where students identify eight major events in their lives (e.g., deaths, first car, entering high school, etc.) and find songs (music and lyrics) to correspond to these events, designing an imaginary soundtrack of their lives. Students write about the experience, submit their compilations, and/or present a song to the class with an explanation of its import. Originally designed to be a writing assignment, with some additional guidance this activity can be used to illustrate narrative psychology, the self, Erikson’s stages, and other theories of personality psychology.

22. Favorite Link Revisited: Review Fun: Grab That Spoon!
Educator and simulation game guru Sivasailam (Thiagi) Thiagarajan maintains a web site with tons of ideas to get participants involved and playing with ideas. Grab That Spoon! is a quick, five-minute game with a dash of friendly competition. It’s a game in which everyone participates regardless of the size of the group (5 or 500, it still works!). It’s a game that allows the learners to generate the review information, to participate in it, and to discuss their own understanding of the material learned. In other words, it’s a game in which the participants learn a lot in a little time!


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 12, August, 2010

August 26, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 12, August, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at Personality Pedagogy. For more about the links below and approximately 2,107 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: Personality Pedagogy.

The big news for this month is that we are celebrating our own Marianne Miserandino, who won the American Psychological Association, Society for the Teaching of Psychology (Division Two) Robert S. Daniel Teaching Excellence Award. Among the many achievements which won her this award is the web site Personality Pedagogy and this very newsletter you are reading! See http://bulletin.arcadia.edu/2010/08/miserandino-accepts-national-award-for-teaching-in-san-diego/ for more information.

This month we are also excited to have found links to the entire ”Gloria” films which now completes our collection! Do you remember this classic 1965 film ”Three Psychotherapies”, where Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis each conduct a therapy session with Gloria? Gloria chose to continue having therapy with Perls, but later regretted not continuing with Carl Rogers. She initiated a warm correspondence with Rogers and his family which continued until her death. Her daughter ”Pammy” (Pamela J. Burry) wrote a biography of Gloria in 2008, ”Living with ‘The Gloria Films”’.

We also have an interesting link to a TED Talk by Sheena Iyengar, Psycho-Economist on the Art of Choosing. In case you don’t know, TED is a small nonprofit devoted to ”Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design.” Some of their previous psychologist speakers have included Martin Seligman, Daniel Gilbert, and Philip Zimbardo. Check out Iyengar, and the others in this fascinating series, if you haven’t already.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the top right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino at arcadia dot edu

1. Carl Rogers: Client-Centered Therapy with Gloria

Carl Rogers doing psychotherapy from the classic film ”Three Approaches to Psychotherapy” (1965) in which Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis each give a demonstration of their approach to therapy with the real client ”Gloria”. The entire section on Rogers is presented here in 5 parts (total runs about 30 minutes).

2. Fritz Perls: Gestalt Therapy with Gloria (29 minutes: 30 seconds)

Fritz Perls doing psychotherapy from the classic film ”Three Approaches to Psychotherapy” (1965) in which Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis each give a demonstration of their approach to therapy with the real client ”Gloria”. (about 30 minutes)

3. Albert Ellis: Rational Emotive Therapy with Gloria. (29 minutes: 48 seconds)

Albert Ellis doing psychotherapy from the classic film ”Three Approaches to Psychotherapy” (1965) in which Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis each give a demonstration of their approach to therapy with the real client ”Gloria”. (about 30 minutes)

4. TeachPsychScience: Resources for Teaching Research and Statistics in Psychology

Gary W. Lewandowski, Natalie Ciarocco and David Strohmetz created this site containing links to peer-reviewed resources for teaching research methods and statistics including online demonstrations, descriptions of class demonstrations, class and lab activities, class assignments, lecture materials, PowerPoints, exemplar studies, and student exercises.

5. What Does Your Avatar Say About You?

”Old or young, beautiful or sinister — the choices are endless when designing an avatar or a virtual alter ego. In the end, do people choose one that is really different from themselves? Usually not, according to new Concordia University research that shows in most cases, avatars reflect the personality of their creators” according to research by H. Onur Bodur and Jean-Francois Belisle published in the August issue of ”Psychology and Marketing” and summarized in ”Science Daily,” July 26, 2010.

6. Should Kids Be Bribed To Do Well in School?

Describes the fascinating and controversial work by Harvard Economist Roland Fryer who studied financial incentives in the classroom in schools in Chicago, Dallas, Washington and New York. Using sound research design, kids were paid for outcomes like good test scores, not fighting, attendance, or reading. The surprising result was that the reading group did the best of all groups on standardized reading scores, and continued to excel the following year in the absence of rewards. Read the details here in this first published summary of his work from ”Time” magazine, April 8, 2010, by Amanda Ripley.

7. Regulations and Ethical Guidelines for Human Subjects Research

The Office of Human Subjects Research of the National Institutes of Health maintains this site which describes their regulations and ethical guidelines for research with human participants, including The Code of Federal Regulations (Title 45 and 46) outlining the functions and operations of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs); The Belmont Report of ethical principles and guidelines for the protection of human subjects of research; and The Nuremburg Code directives for human experimentation.

8. Test Your Cultural Awareness

Kwintessential, a company specializing in intercultural communication, translation, interpretation, and training provides these free online tests of respondents’ cultural awareness and knowledge. Includes quizzes of country locations, world capitals, world languages, and cultural awareness like business card etiquette and dining etiquette. There are a few general quizzes as well as over 20 tests of cultural awareness in specific countries including Argentina, Belarus, Bolivia, Chile, Egypt, Iran, Turkey and more.

9. Cultural Understanding: Teaching Resources from the Peace Corps

The Paul D. Coverdell World Wise Schools program of the Peace Corps provides resources to enrich the K-12 classroom (many can be modified for college-level classes) ranging from publications, speakers, volunteer stories, multimedia, service learning, classroom projects, and lesson plans. Many of the lesson plans include exercises and simulations for teaching diversity in social studies, science, literature, and psychology classes.

10. You Are Sexually Attracted to Your Parents And Yourself

According to research by R. Chris Fraley and Michael J. Marks, ”Westermarck, Freud, and the Incest Taboo: Does Familial Resemblance Activate Sexual Attraction?” Published online in the ”Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” July 20, 2010, and summarized here, ”People appear to be drawn to others who resembler their kin or themselves”. The summary reports that ”All three experiments support the Freudian idea that we have subconscious mechanisms that make us attracted to features that remind us of our own, and that cultural taboos against incest exist to override that primitive drive.”

11. 5 Reliable Findings From Happiness Research

John Grohol compiled this list including lottery winnings create only short-term happiness, the importance of relationships and experiences over money and possessions, and how we can control about 40-50% of our own happiness and briefly discusses some of the criticisms of the positive psychology movement.

12. Science Fair Projects and Experiments

Topics, ideas, resources, and sample projects for primary, elementary, middle and high school students and teachers compiled by Julian Rubin. Includes science fair projects types, the scientific method, the display board for many topics in Psychology and Human Behavior. Personality projects include: Myers-Briggs type indicator, addictive behavior, birth order, stress and self-esteem, mood and humor, and more. With minor modifications, some topics and projects may also be suitable for college-level laboratory classes in personality psychology.

13. TED Talk: Sheena Iyengar, Psycho-Economist On the Art of Choosing

For Americans, choosing is a way of asserting our individuality, while in other cultures deferring to the choices of respected others is a way of creating community and fostering harmony. Her her talk about her work on choice, locus of control, and culture, including the famous 24 varieties of jam study, in this TED talk. (Posted July 2010. Duration: 24:05)

14. Personality May Influence Brain Shrinkage in Aging

Studying MRI images of volunteers aged 44-88 researchers found ”lower volumes of gray matter in the frontal and medial temporal brain regions of volunteers who ranked high in neuroticism traits, compared with higher volumes of gray matter in those who ranked high in conscientious traits” according to research by Jonathan Jackson, David A. Balota, and Denise Head published in the journal ”Neurobiology and Aging” and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, April 27, 2010.

15. Changing Thoughts Key to Battling Even Severe Depression

”Moderate to severely depressed clients showed greater improvement in cognitive therapy when therapists emphasized changing how they think rather than how they behave, new research has found.” According to research by Daniel R. Strunk, Melissa A. Brotman and Robert J. DeRubeis published in the journal Behaviour Research and Therapy, and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, May 14, 2010.

16. Sigmund Freud

Excellent overview of Freud’s life, theory, therapy, and references, including a critical look at the claim to scientific status of his theory and the efficacy of psychoanalytic therapy.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 5, January, 2010

January 24, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 5, January, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-first Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy New Year! Happy New Semester!

We just found a fascinating article in this month’s Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. E. J. Horberg and Serena Chen, at the University of California, Berkeley, tested the concept of relationship-specific self-worth. This concept is related to both the contingencies of self-worth literature and to the classic notion of conditional positive regard from Carl Rogers. Across three studies, Horberg and Chen found evidence that people can feel good or bad about themselves based on their performance in an area in which a significant other wants them to do well in. This article is the first (that we know of, anyway) to provide evidence for the fascinating dynamic of conditional and unconditional positive regard.

Alas, I was unable to find a summary or press release to link to on Personality Pedagogy, but perhaps you can find the full article through your library:

Horger, E. J. & Chen, S. (2010). Significant Others and Contingencies of Self-Worth: Activation and Consequences of Relationship-Specific Contingencies of Self-Worth. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98 (1), 77–91

Did you happen to catch the new PBS series which premiered this month called This Emotional Life? We’re still talking about it around here. Daniel Gilbert explores what makes us happy, including relationships, positive and negative emotions, and universal traits of happiness. Check out the website (below) where you can see more about the people and stories featured on the series, learn more about the topics mentioned, find information about resources and support organizations, and purchase a DVD (if you didn’t manage to record this for yourself). The section on attachment theory was particularly well done and featured videos of the original Harlow monkey studies. In addition to the parts on attachment, happiness, resilience, and emotions, which are directly relevant to a personality class, other parts of the series relate to abnormal, social, and intro psychology classes.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or you can even re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our new blog: https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/  You can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (“Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. Why and How to Write APA-Style Citations
The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to
announce the following new resource: ”Why and How to Write APA-Style Citations in the Body and Reference Section of Your Papers (2010)” by
Drew C. Appleby (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis). This
resource is a 35-slide packet (in Microsoft PowerPoint®) that instructors can use to lecture about writing APA-style citations, following guidelines of the 6th edition of The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. In addition, a short file for the instructor provides suggestions for how to use the slides in classes.

2. A Template Paper with Comments for Illustrating the 6th Edition of APA Style (2010)
The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to
announce the following new resource: ”This resource uses a 14-page undergraduate research paper to illustrate many features of the 6th edition of APA style by presenting the paper as a sample for students to emulate. Extensive comments in the margin call attention to the feature being highlighted. The sample paper has more extensive explanations of APA style than the sample papers in the APA Publication Manual and by not overlapping pages, users can read the entire paper’s content”. Written by Jordan Buess and Rick Froman of John Brown University.

3. Few Gender Differences in Math Abilities, Worldwide Study Finds
”Girls around the world are not worse at math than boys, even though boys are more confident in their math abilities, and girls from countries where gender equity is more prevalent are more likely to perform better on mathematics assessment tests”, according to a new meta-analysis of international research by Nicole Else-Quest, summarized here, and published in the January 2010 edition of the “Psychological Bulletin”. From “ScienceDaily,” January 6, 2010.

4. This Emotional Life
From the website: ”A three-part series that explores improving our social relationships, learning to cope with depression and anxiety, and becoming more positive, resilient individuals. Harvard psychologist and best-selling author of ”Stumbling on Happiness”, Professor Daniel Gilbert, talks with experts about the latest science on what makes us ”tick” and how we can find support for the emotional issues we all face. Each episode weaves together the compelling personal stories of ordinary people and the latest scientific research along with revealing comments from celebrities like Chevy Chase, Larry David, Alanis Morissette, Robert Kennedy, Jr., and Richard Gere. The first episode, ”Family, Friends & Lovers”, looks at the importance of relationships and why they are central to our emotional well-being” (including an excellent overview of and current research on Attachment theory). ”In the second episode, ”Facing Our Fears”, we look at emotions that are commonly regarded as obstacles to happiness — such as anger, fear, anxiety, and despair” (includes a discussion of Anger, Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Stress and Anxiety). ”The last episode, ”Rethinking Happiness”, explores happiness. It is so critical to our well-being, and, yet, it remains such an elusive goal for many of us”
(includes Creativity and Flow, Forgiveness, Happiness, Humor, Meditation, Resilience).

5. Life History Manuscripts from the Folklore Project, WPA Federal Writer’s Project, 1936-1940
From the website: ”These life histories were compiled and transcribed by the staff of the Folklore Project of the Federal Writers’ Project for the U.S. Works Progress (later Work Projects) Administration (WPA) from 1936-1940. The Library of Congress collection includes 2,900 documents representing the work of over 300 writers from 24 states. Typically 2,000-15,000 words in length, the documents consist of drafts and revisions, varying in form from narrative to dialogue to report to case history. The histories describe the informant’s family education, income, occupation, political views, religion and mores, medical needs, diet and miscellaneous observations. Pseudonyms are often substituted for individuals and places named in the narrative texts.”

6. Carl Rogers: Overview
Overview of Roger’s theories including a discussion of the 3 essential conditions for a therapeutic relationship and the 10 questions therapists should ask themselves to assure that they are creating a truly helping relationship.

7. Carl Rogers: On Education
From the website: ”Best known for his contribution to client-centered therapy and his role in the development of counseling, Rogers also had much to say about education and group work.”

8. Behavior: Skinner’s Utopia: Panacea, or Path to Hell?
To mark the release of Skinner’s book ”Beyond Freedom and Dignity”, ”Time” magazine presented this overview of Skinner’s life and theory, his controversial book, and what it means for modern society. While some of the references are dated (e.g. President Nixon), the questions raised by both Skinner and his opponents are as relevant as ever for our time. Originally published Monday, Sep. 20, 1971.

9. Skinner’s Teaching Machine of the Future
Skinner himself explains why ”studdying by way of a teaching machine is often dramatically effective” in this classic black and white film clip. (runs 4 minutes, 19 seconds; contains Spanish subtitles)

10. Skinner on Reinforcement
An in-depth view of how Skinner trained pigeons to read in this classic film clip. Includes a discussion of schedules of reinforcement, gambling, and his controversial views on free will (runs 3 minutes, 58 seconds).

11. Common Cognitive Distortions
John M. Grohol explains ”What’s a cognitive distortion and why do so many people have them? Cognitive distortions are simply ways that our mind convinces us of something that isn’t really true. These inaccurate thoughts are usually used to reinforce negative thinking or emotions — telling ourselves things that sound rational and accurate, but really only serve to keep us feeling bad about ourselves.” Briefly describes 15 common cognitive distortions including overgeneralizations, jumping to conclusions, catastrophizing, and more.

12. Fixing Cognitive Distortions
John M. Grohol explains, ”Cognitive distortions have a way of playing havoc with our lives. If we let them. This kind of ”stinkin’ thinkin”’ can be ”undone,” but it takes effort and lots of practice — every day.” The 8 exercises described here will help readers identify and reverse cognitive errors including thinking in black and white, unrealistic beliefs, and overgeneralizations.