Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 10, June 2015

June 21, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,161 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This big news this month is that Personality Pedagogy has a new look: photos! If you browse any of our pages, you will notice the content is there but the layout is more aesthetically pleasing, incorporating many photos and illustrations. Also, we are now a mobile friendly site, meaning that it is easier than ever to look up content on the fly when you away from your computer. We will continue updating and repairing broken links over the summer and in the process finding new sites to add as you can see by this packed newsletter.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Using OK Cupid to Teach Research Methods

Co-founder Christian Rudder talks about how OK Cupid collects and uses data. Their methods raise important questions about research including: “What are different kinds of social science data? How can/should we manipulate respondents to get it? What does it look like? How can it be used to answer questions? Or, how can we understand the important difference between having the data and doing an interpretation of it?”

3. Positive Reinforcement – The Big Bang Theory

Sheldon uses chocolate to shape Penny’s behavior. Later, Sheldon and Leonard have a discussion of conditioning, which, despite some misuse of terms, may still spark discussion in your class.

4. Nature v Nurture: Research Shows It’s Both

A meta-analysis of almost every twin study conducted from across the world shows that the average variation for human traits and diseases is 49% genetic and 51% due to environmental factors. This, according to research published in the journal Nature Genetics and summarized here. Published May 15, 2015.

5. On The California Shore, Sizing Up Female Marines’ Combat Readiness

The Pentagon has decreed that the Marines must open combat roles for women by 2016 unless they can show a good reason not to. The Marine Corps has teamed up with the University of Pittsburgh to scientifically measure skills, strength, and endurance in order to establish valid and reliable gender-neutral standards.

6. How 4th Grade Predicts Your Future

“A growing body of psychological research is revealing a few remarkable connections between our childhood experiences with peers and our lives in adulthood.” Read about personality coherence of adult personality in kids who were rejected, controversial, neglected, and accepted as fourth graders. From “Psychology Today”, June 2015.

7. James Randi Educational Foundation

“James Randi has an international reputation as a magician and escape artist, but today he is best known as the world’s most tireless investigator and demystifier of paranormal and pseudoscientific claims.” Towards this end, his website features educational modules on “How to Think About Dubious Claims”, “Astrology: Superstition or Science?”, “Do you have ESP?” and more.

8. A Key Researcher Says “Grit” isn’t Ready for High-Stakes Measures

Grit, the “ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal”, has been embraced by educators, the media. But according to researcher Angela Duckworth, “the enthusiasm is getting ahead of the science”. From NPR, May 13, 2015.

9. This Day in Jewish History: A Psychoanalyst Who Couldn’t Understand War is Born

“March 23, 1900 is the birthdate of the Jewish scholar and psychoanalyst Erich Fromm, who gave up the religious obligations of the Orthodox Judaism of his youth for the study of the psychology of love – and war, which, to his mind, made very little rational sense.” From “Haaretz”, March 23, 2015.

10. Allport

A whiteboard video animation on the life of Gordon Allport. Runs 2 minutes and 19 seconds.

11. Gordon Allport Wiki

Includes pages on Allport’s early life, trait theory, and his visit with Freud.

12. Social Psychology Then and Now

Writing for the APS Observer, Anthony G. Greenwald describes the life and work of Gordon Allport including his work related to attitudes, IAT, prejudice, values, and more. From January 2013.

13. A Profile of Aaron Beck

“PsychCentral” presents this brief profile of Aaron Beck.

14. The Doctor is IN

“The American Scholar” presents this overview of the life, work, and theories of Aaron Beck. Posted September 2009.

15. Whether You’re a Lark or a Night Owl, Your Sleeping Habits Say Volumes About Your Health.

A brief summary of the research on morning larks and night owls and how they differ in their disposition, breakfast habits, alarm clock use, vulnerability to jet lag, age, and more. From April 2013.

16. Centre For Personal Construct Psychology

The University of Hertfordshire maintains this site related to personal construct psychology (PCP). Features background information on PCP, George Kelly, the repertory grid, courses and services, literature and library, and more.

17. Kelly (1978): Confusion and the Clock

The last work of George Kelly where he discusses the idea of death. Originally published as Kelly, G.A. (1978) Confusion and the Clock In Fransella, F. (Ed.) Personal Construct Psychology. Academic Press.

18. Kelly (1969): The Threat of Aggression

Kelly, G. A. (1969). The threat of aggression. In B. Maher (Ed.), Clinical Psychology and Personality: The Selected Papers of George Kelly (pp. 281-288). London, UK: Wiley.

19. The Duckworth Lab

The research lab of Angela Duckworth at the University of Pennsylvania: “Our lab focuses on two traits that predict achievement: grit and self-control. Grit is the tendency to sustain interest in and effort toward very long-term goals (Duckworth et al., 2007). Self-control is the voluntary regulation of behavioral, emotional, and attentional impulses in the presence of momentarily gratifying temptations or diversions (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005; Duckworth & Steinberg, 2015).”

20. Favorite Link Revisited: The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook

The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook Mike Masnick discusses an “experiment” conducted by David Plotz of Slate magazine. Plotz noted that well-wishers responded automatically when they saw that a friend was having a birthday on Facebook.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 8, April 2014

April 30, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,982 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Where did this semester go? For the first two months many of us barely had a complete week without missing a class day and here it is, finals already! We’ll keep this month’s issue short, sweet and highly entertaining. But first, in honor of finals week at my school, a few thought questions for you: Is Vladimir Putin a Narcissist? How is psychological science like Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows? Can you use your French toast as a kind of Rorschach test? Read on to find out!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Self-Other Agreement in Personality judgements

Seth Kaplan, Alicia Stachowski and Jill Bradley-Geist describe a classroom activity in which students judge each other using the five factors. The exercise can be used to illustrate the five factors, personality testing, interpersonal judgement, and self-awareness, as well as serve as a lively ice breaker exercise.

3. Inspiring Short Video: What is it that you desire most?

This short video is actually an advertisement for a Thai Insurance Company. In it, a man is depicted going through his day where things keep going wrong and yet he cheerfully continues to help people around him: “What does he get in return for doing this every day? He gets nothing. He won’t be richer. He won’t appear on TV. Still anonymous. And not a bit more famous. What he does receive are emotions. He witness happiness. Reaches a deeper understanding. Feels the love. Receives what money can’t buy and a world made more beautiful.” Published on April 5, 2014. Runs 3 minutes, 5 seconds.

4. Guide Your Students to Become Better Research Consumers

In this article for the April 2014 APS “Observer” psychologist Beth Morling outlines four validities (external, internal, construct, statistical) which are easy to remember and can help students to more critically evaluate research.

5. The Deathly Hallows of Psychological Science

Personality psychologist Brent Roberts compares the proposed changes to improve psychological science — including the Open Science Framework, journal reporting practices, and new statistics — to the dilemma Harry Potter faces in the final book of the series “The Deathly Hallows”. The dilemma we face is whether to destroy the Horcrux by eliminating problematic practices or to continue in the path of least resistance by pursuing the Deathly Hallows. His vivid analogy and clear description of the problem make this a thought-provoking and challenging read for any psychological scientist. Posted March 2014.

6. Inside Social Modeling With Albert Bandura

The Association for Psychological Science presented this special edition of “Inside the Psychologist’s Studio” featuring an in-depth interview with Albert Bandura. Filmed August 26, 2013 at Stanford University, the video runs 46 minutes and 03 seconds.

7. Photos of Identical Twins As Grown-Ups Show How Fate Takes Its Course

Beijing-based photographer Gao Rongguo captured this series of photos of men and women — identical twins — over 50 years of age. These haunting images raise the question of how genetics and our experiences make us who we are. Posted March 2014.

8. IRBs and Research on Teaching and Learning (2014)

Ryan C. Martin, Regan A. R. Gurung, and Janie H. Wilson put together this resource for the Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP). This unit “addresses common questions researchers might have about seeking approval from Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) to conduct research on teaching and learning (often called the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; SoTL)”. It is available under the Ethics tab.

9. Vladimir Putin, Narcissist?

Writing for the “The Atlantic”, Joseph Burgo examines how the concept of narcissism might provide insight into the Russian leader. Published April 15, 2014.

10. 5 Surefire Signs Someone You Care About is A Narcissist

Writing for the “Huff Post” Sharon Greenthal describes these five signs: “Believing that you’re better than others; fantasizing about power, success and attractiveness; exaggerating your achievements or talents; expecting constant praise and admiration; and believing that you’re special and acting accordingly.” Published February 24, 2014.

11. French Toast Rorschach Test

This entertaining “test”  will help you to determine which type of French Toast you should order when you go to its sponsor, the restaurant chain Denny’s. The images are eerily reminiscent of actual Rorschach cards. A fun way to open a discussion on projective tests, test construction, validity and reliability, and more.

12. Myers & Dewall Talk Psych

“David Myers and Nathan DeWall enjoy connecting psychological science with everyday life. In Myers and DeWall Talk Psych they share exciting new findings, everyday applications, and observations on all things psychology.”

13. Study Reveals How Neurotic People View Action

According to new research by Molly E. Ireland, Justin Hepler,  Hong Li, and Dolores Albarracin published in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for “The Huffington Post” there is a relationship between Neuroticism and negative attitudes towards action and positive attitudes towards inaction. Posted April 27, 2014.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: A Flashcard Strategy to Help Students Prepare for Three Types of Multiple-Choice Questions Commonly Found on Introductory Psychology Tests (2013)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) presents this resource (click to expand the Introductory Psychology category) by Drew Appleby to provide students with a research-based study strategy designed to help them understand, prepare for, and take multiple-choice tests more successfully. The 32 slides that accompany the introductory article familiarize students with three types of cognitive processes their instructors will commonly ask them to use in their classes and then invite them to model the behavior of their instructors by creating flashcards. Their flashcards should contain verbatim definitions for retention questions, accurate paraphrases for comprehension questions, and realistic examples for application questions.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 4, December 2013

December 23, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,920 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month as the world celebrates many holidays, we bring you a shortened version of this newsletter. From all of us here at Personality Pedagogy, we wish you a new year filled with attachment, self-efficacy, self-actualization, mastery, happiness, and much, much more!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Twenty Tips for Interpreting Scientific claims

William J. Sutherland, David Spiegelhalter, and Mark Burgman, researchers in various fields, offer this “simple list of ideas that could help decision-makers to parse how evidence can contribute to a decision” tips in “Nature” Magazine, November 20, 2013.

3. Are You a Career Adapter?

Career adaptability, the “ability to manage existing and impending career challenges” including concern for future career tasks and challenges, control and self-discipline, curiosity, and confidence is related to personality traits including extraversion, conscientiousness, and neuroticism. This research was originally published this month in the “Journal of Vocational Behavior”, and summarized here on the Association for Psychological Science research blog, December 17, 2013.

4. Famous Personality Types

If you are a fan of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and other similar tests of personality, then check out this graphic showing all 16 personality types with “real life successful people” from celebrities to pop icons illustrating each of the types.

5. Narcissism Unleashed: Can an Entire Culture Be Narcissistic?

W. Keith Campbell and Jean M. Twenge review recent research which suggests a cultural epidemic of narcissism. The self-centeredness, arrogance, and self-absorption of individual narcissists may actually describe quite well American culture of the present day. From the Association for Psychological Science “Observer”, December 2013.

6. Meditation Changes How Genes Are Expressed

Research by Kaliman et al. (2014) found that people who meditated, compared to control subjects who engaged in quiet non-meditative activities, showed changes in gene functioning at the molecular level, demonstrating epigenetic alterations of the genome. This link is to the original press release from the University of Wisconsin-Madison; this link is to a summary of the press release from “PsyBlog”.

7. You Just Have to Believe: Audacious Ambition

“Researchers Timothy Judge and John Kammeyer-Mueller have shown that people who believe they can accomplish the goals they set are more likely to accomplish them. This is because if you believe you can accomplish your goal, you are more likely to put in the energy and effort required to attain it.” From the “PsychCentral” blog, December 2013.

8. Haste Makes Waste, But Not if You’re Neurotic

Despite popular wisdom that “haste makes waste”, people who are high in neuroticism make “more accurate judgments the faster they respond” according to research by James Bell and colleagues published in “Psychology of Sport and Exercise” and summarized here in “BPS Research Digest”, November 2013.

9. Night Owls and Early Risers Have Different Brain Structures

Using brain scans, researchers found that night owls showed “reduced integrity” of while matter” in the several areas of the brain, compared to early risers.

And for those of you with Christmas cookies in the house . . .

10. 2 Easy Ways to Increase Willpower — Courtesy Of The Cookie Monster

Eric Barker, in his “Barking Up The Wrong Tree” blog, reviews the research on willpower and how to delay gratification using videos of kids and the Cookie Monster. Interestingly, Sesame Street actually consulted with Walter Mischel, the originator of the marshmallow test, to be sure that Cookie got his psychology correct. Cookie Monster illustrates that distraction and focus can help self-control in a charming music video. From December 2, 2013.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 12, August, 2013

August 27, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,837 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Special thanks go out this month to Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast. In illustrating a new tool called “Storify” (see Storify.com) for the Psych News discussion list for teachers of high school psychology, he pointed out three real-world examples of how forced ranking systems for employee assessment may backfire. We have added them to “Personality Pedagogy” under Assessment.

In addition, to herald the end of summer and the beginning of a new year and a new semester, we present three new links for teaching and leaning: Teaching Chance, Teaching Ethics, and The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University and we revisit the Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning. These later two resources contain everything you need to know about teaching and learning from designing syllabi, to ideas for what to do the first day of class to how to assess students’ learning and your teaching. We hope that you will find something here to inspire you to try something new and make this year a great one!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Other People Matter: Three International Positive Psychology Association Tributes to Chris Peterson

Nansook Park, Barbara Fredrickson, and Martin Seligman each gave moving tributes to the late Christopher Peterson at the Third World Congress of the International Positive Psychology Association. Their talks are summarized here in “Positive Psychology News Daily”, July 26, 2013.

3. 10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier

Grounded in research, these activities including practicing gratitude, controlling counter-factual thinking and others may be used to spark discussion or to introduce topics in stress, resilience, cognition, emotion, and positive psychology.

4. Optimists Better at Regulating Stress

“It’s no surprise that those who tend to see a rose’s blooms before its thorns are also better at handling stress. But science has failed to reliably associate optimism with individuals’ biological stress response — until now” according to “Science Daily”, July 23, 2013, summarizing research by Joelle Jobin and Carsten Wrosch published in “Health Psychology”.

5. Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung on Human Personality in Rare BBC Interview

Maria Popova of “Brain Pickings” introduces this video: “On October 22 of 1959, BBC’s Face to Face — an unusual series of pointed, almost interrogative interviews seeking to “unmask public figures” — aired a segment on Jung […] Eighty-four at the time and still working, he talks to New Statesman editor John Freeman about education, religion, consciousness, human nature, and his temperamental differences with Freud, which sparked his study of personality types”. Includes a transcript of the highlights. (Runs 39 minutes, 28 seconds).

6. 6 Things You Thought Wrong About Introverts

The “Huffington Post,” July 28, 2013, presents this list of 6 common misconceptions about introverts based on stereotypes.

7. Acceptance of What Can’t Be Changed Is Key To Satisfaction In Later Life, Research Shows

“When it comes to life satisfaction in one’s later years, the ability to accept what cannot be changed is equally important to the feeling of being able to exert control over one’s life” according to research published in the “Journal of Happiness Studies” and summaries here in the “Huffington Post”, July 12, 2013.

8. Scientific Literacy in a Psychology Curriculum Module (2013)

“The authors describe 9 scientific literacy activities to teach Introductory Psychology students how to read original research reports, critically and thoroughly evaluate secondary research reports, and analyze the utility of each. A 25-page document describes the activities without answers for instructors, a 34-page booklet provides students with the materials they need, and 148 slides contain material without answers that instructors can use in class. Versions with answers to students’ assignments are available to members after logging into STP’s website.” Find the link under the INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY category.

9. Seeing Narcissists Everywhere

Jean M. Twenge, author of “Generation Me” and “The Narcissism Epidemic” talks about her research and the high rate of narcissism today compared to earlier generations in this interview with the “New York Times”, August 5, 2013.

10. Detachment

Virginia Hughes, writing for “Aeon Magazine” describes the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, in which Romanian orphans living in orphanages were randomly assigned to foster care or to stay in the orphanage. Preliminary results suggest that children raised in foster care showed gains in IQ, healthier psychological development, better motor skills, different EEG brainwave patterns when looking at emotional faces, and more white matter than children left in orphanages. This fascinating study, begun in 2000 and continuing today, raises ethical, social, and political questions as it vividly demonstrates the power of social interaction and attachment. Published July 29, 2013.

11. Who Feels Treated Unfairly After Taking An Assessment?

Researchers Laura Honkaniemi, Taru Feldt, Riitta-Leena Metsäpelto, and Asko Tolvanen identified three personality types who differ in their Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness. They found that people hold different perceptions of the fairness of personality testing depending on their personality type: Overcontrolled, Undercontrolled, Resilient, or Bohemian according this summary published in the “British Psychological Society Research Digest”, August 1, 2013.

12. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Worksheets

Free downloadable cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) worksheets, formulations, and self-help resources including blank formulations, thought records, cognitive restructuring worksheets, diaries/data gathering sheets, mechanisms, information sheets, techniques/procedures, useful tools, forgiveness tools, and formulations for specific disorders, all in PDF format.

13. Stacked (Forced) Ranking

From Michael Britt at “The Psych Files”: “Here’s a sound byte from an episode of TWIT (This Week in Technology: http://twit.tv/twit) podcast in which Leo Laporte and John Dvorak discuss the negative effects of a performance appraisal system often called Stacked or Forced ranking. Psychologists refer to scales like this as ordinal scales”. From July 15, 2012, show #362. (This audio clip runs 1 minute, 55 seconds).

14. Forced Ranking: The Poisonous Employee-Ranking System That Helps Explain Microsoft’s Decline

Writing for “Slate Magazine”, Will Oremus, on August 23, 2013 claims that “Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer oversaw a system called “stack ranking,” in which employees on the same team competed directly with one another for money and promotions. Critics say this rewarded brown-nosing and sabotage”.

15. Microsoft’s Lost Decade Due to Forced Ranking Appraisal Systems

Kurt Eichenwald argues that a forced ranking system may have had negative effects on Microsoft’s corporate culture. From “Vanity Fair”, August 2012.

16. Chance

J. Laurie Snell of Dartmouth College presents this page of resources for teaching a course in probability and statistics including videos, audios, syllabi, activities, computer simulations, data sets, links to internet resources, and a Teacher’s Guide for teaching a quantitative literacy course.

17. The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation

The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University presents this extensive online resource which features resources to help new and established faculty design and teach a course, incorporate technology, assess teaching and learning, apply principles of teaching and learning, and more.

18. Teaching Ethics to Undergraduate Psychology Students (TEUPS)

TEUPS is a centralized location for faculty looking for ideas for activities, articles, books, associations, videos, films, lectures, and other resources that are related or could be useful in incorporating ethics into the undergraduate psychology curriculum. This website will be an invaluable resource for those interested in following APA recommendations regarding the teaching of ethics as presented in the Principles for Quality Undergraduate Education in Psychology (2011) and the Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major (2007).

19. Favorite Link Revisited: U.C. Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning

U.C. Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning presents this compendium of classroom-tested strategies and suggestions designed to improve the teaching practices of all college instructors, including beginning, mid-career, and senior faculty members. The page features links to teaching tools that cover both traditional practical tasks–writing a course syllabus, delivering an effective lecture–as well as newer concerns such as technology and online learning.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 11, July, 2013

July 24, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-third Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,821 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you know that narcissists really are as sexy as they think, extroverts are happier and healthier later in life than introverts, and that gloomy thinking can be contagious? Well, it’s a good thing we also have a link to the inspirational Helen Keller and her thoughts on optimism this month. And as a special bonus to subscribers, you can check out this link to hear Keller explain — in her own words and voice —  her greatest regret.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Britain Could Create First ‘Three-parent Baby’ Through IVF

“Parents at high risk of having children with severe disabilities such as muscular dystrophy will be offered the controversial new IVF treatment after it was given the green light by ministers” in the UK today according to this article and video in “The Telegraph”, June 28, 2013. Video runs 2 minutes, 6 seconds.

3. Eight Misconceptions About “Three-Parent Babies”

What to know as the UK works to reverse ban on modifying future children’s genes. From “Psychology Today”, July 10, 2013.

4. We Can’t Undo What Our Parents Have Given Us

Royal Society fellow and epigenetics researcher Edith Heard clarifies the facts and downplays the hype behind recent developments in genetics and epigenetics in this article from “The Guardian”, June 22, 2013.

5. Are Narcissists As Sexy As They Think?

Narcissists think they are sexy. But, then again, they would say that. New research by Dufner et al. (2013) published in “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here in “PsyBlog” suggests that the self-enhancing thoughts and beliefs of narcissists actually make them more attractive to others.

6. Narcissists’ Lack of Empathy Detected in Brain Scans

“Researchers used magnetic resonance imaging to scan the brains of 34 people, including 17 individuals who suffer from narcissistic personality disorder, and found that pathological narcissists have less gray matter in a part of the cerebral cortex called the left anterior insula” according to research published in “The Journal of Psychiatric Research” and summarized here in “Live Science”, June 24, 2013.

7. Extroverts are Happier and Healthier Later in Life

“People who were more outgoing and social during their younger years reported being significantly happier and more satisfied later in life”, according to research by Catharine Gale and colleagues published in the “Journal of Research in Personality” and summarized here in “Discover Magazine” online, July 8, 2013.

8. What Makes Us Extroverts and Introverts?

Drawing on the theories of Carl Jung, Hans Eysenck, and current research in neuroscience, BBC staff writer Tom Stafford explains how the way the brain processes rewards may make people more extroverted or introverted. From July 17, 2013.

9. Gloomy Thinking Can Be Contagious

A particular style of thinking — interpreting the causes of negative events as internal and stable or external and unstable — may actually infect roommates making them more or less vulnerable to depression six months later. This, according to research published by Gerald Haeffel and Jennifer Hames in the journal “Clinical Psychological Science” and described in this report from NPR’s “Morning Edition”, June 24, 2013. Runs 4 minutes, 25 seconds.

10. Helen Keller on Optimism

Maria Popova for “Brain Pickings” shares her musings on Helen Keller’s moving treatise on optimism from 1903. Posted June 6, 2013.

11. Correlation vs. Causation

Everyday Einstein, Lee Falin, “uncovers the truth (and lies) of the correlation/causation fallacy. Just because something seems to cause something else, does not necessarily mean it does.” June 21, 2013.

12. Genes and Memes: Just for Hits – Richard Dawkins

Evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins describes the process of evolution focusing on successful and unsuccessful genes and memes in this entertaining and unusual introduction to the Saatchi & Saatchi New Directors’ Showcase 2013 in Cannes (runs 8 minutes and 47 seconds).

13. How to Increase Willpower: Extended Interview with Roy Baumeister

Eric Barker, of the Barking Up the Wrong Tree blog presents this interview with Roy Baumeister, author of “Willpower: Rediscovering The Greatest Human Strength”, June 25, 2013.

14. What Can Self-Control Do For You?

Can self-control make you happy, willing to sacrifice for others, fairer, unethical or easy to hypnotize? Read on to find out about all 10 new studies which provide surprising answers to these and other questions about what self-control can do for you.

15. Resilience in the Wake of Superstorm Sandy

Social factors such as neighborhood bonds and social supports are important factors in helping people cope with the devastation of Hurricane Sandy according to a recent study summarized here in “Science Daily”, June 24, 2013.

16. A Flashcard Strategy to Help Students Prepare for Three Types of Multiple-Choice Questions Commonly Found on Introductory Psychology Tests

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology presents this resource (click to expand the “Introductory Psychology” category) by Drew Appleby to provide students with a research-based study strategy designed to help them understand, prepare for, and take multiple-choice tests more successfully. The 32 slides that accompany the introductory article familiarize students with three types of cognitive processes their instructors will commonly ask them to use in their classes and then invite them to model the behavior of their instructors by creating flashcards.  Their flashcards should contain verbatim definitions for retention questions, accurate paraphrases for comprehension questions, and realistic examples for application questions.

17. Favorite Link Revisited: Psychmovies.com

Brooke J. Cannon, Marywood University, created and maintains this extensive site which lists movies illustrative psychological principles organized by topic, genre, and popularity ratings. Check out her suggestions for mood disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 9, May, 2013

May 12, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-first Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,781 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month’s newsletter is dedicated to my Personality class. It seems that we fell into an interesting habit last semester (I usually have the same students for this two-semester sequence of Social and Personality psychology). At the request of one of the members, before every exam we went around the room and each person said something encouraging out loud to the next person about how they were going to do well on the exam. They said things like, “I don’t know your name, but you’ve never missed a class, you’re going to do great” or “I hear the scritch-scratch of your pencil behind me so I know you’re taking good notes”. It seemed to calm everybody down. Well, research published this month suggests that self-affirmations can increase problem-solving abilities! So, my class was onto something even before the research evidence was in.

Also, this month, we feature a veritable grab-bag of topics, most of them on the newest research findings in personality psychology: everything from personality changes and weight gain, to the 10 most narcissistic US presidents, to making the world a kinder place. There’s a little something for everyone here, including links to the effect named for the man who made a living on that philosophy: P.T. Barnum.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Self-Affirmation Improves Problem-Solving Under Stress

Research suggests that the identifying and thinking about one’s most important values can increase individuals’ problem-solving abilities. This, according to research by J. David Creswell and colleagues published in “PLOS ONE” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, May 3, 2013.

3. The Biology of Kindness: How it Makes Us Happier and Healthier

Summarizes research by Barbara Fredrickson and colleagues which finds that people who engage in Loving Kindness meditation show great responsiveness of the vagus nerve which plays a role in regulating glucose levels, immune responses, altruistic behavior, and how we connect and bond to one another. From “Time”, May 9, 2013.

4. Bonding with Avatar May Alter Perception of Virtual Reality

“When individuals create their own avatar and modify it, the difficult situations faced by their alter egos may influence the perception of the virtual environment” according to research by Shyam Sundar and colleagues summarized here for PsychCentral, May 6, 2013.

5. Six Ways to Separate Lies From Statistics

Public Policy professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers present these ways in which non-experts can separate useful statistics from the lies in this article for “Bloomberg”, May 2, 1013.

6. You’ll Never Learn: A New Marshmallow Test?

Is resisting a “blinking inbox or a buzzing phone” the new marshmallow test of self-discipline? Read about new evidence on self-discipline and multitasking in this article from “Slate”, May 3, 2013.

7. Weight Gain Linked With Impulsively-Related Personality Trait Changes

“People who gain weight are more likely to give in to temptations but also are more thoughtful about their actions, according to a new study” published by Angelina Sutin and colleagues in “Psychological Science” and summarized here, May 6, 2013.

8. The 10 Most Narcissistic U.S. Presidents

“Scott Lilienfeld and his student Ashley Watts recently found evidence that a personality trait called “grandiose narcissism” predicts greatness in U.S. presidents—and also malignancy” in a new study published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here, May 8, 2013.

9. Nice Guys Finish Last. Really? What Does The Research Say?

Eric Barker of the “Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog weighs the evidence to see if there is any truth to this old adage. When it comes to money, dating and marriage, leadership and life in general, it all depends on what aspect of life you are looking at. Published May 10, 2013.

10. The Times and Troubles of the Scientific Method

“Science is working tirelessly night and day to disprove its own theories about how the universe works (or at least, that’s what science thinks it’s doing). Hank tells us a quick history of how we came to create and adopt the scientific method and then gives us a vision of the future of science (hint: it involves a lot more computers and a lot less pipetting)”. Posted by SciShow, April 29, 2013. (runs 11 minutes, 8 seconds)

11. National African American Photographic Archive

Collects, scans, and makes available to the public “photographs and informative metadata illustrating the daily and work lives and social activities of African Americans.”

12. Dan Ariely: What Makes Us Feel Good About Our Work?

“What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn’t just money. But it’s not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioral economist Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our work”. This TEDx talk was Posted April 10, 2013 and runs 20 minutes, 27 seconds.

13. Do You Fear Missing Out?

Obsessive checking of Twitter and Facebook to see what your friends are doing may have led to a new type of fear: FoMO. The fear of missing out is the “concern that others may be having more fun and rewarding experiences than” we are. Read all about it in this summary from “Science Daily”, April 29, 2013.

14. The Fear of Missing Out

Are you of those people who need to check social media constantly to see what their friends are up to? Take this brief test to see how you compare to others in this new fear that others “may be having more fun and rewarding experiences than we are”.

15. Emotional Intelligence Trumps IQ in Dentist-Patient Relationship

IQ may predict who does well in dental school, but EQ predicts who will make the best patient-friendly dentists. This according to research by Kristin Victoroff and colleagues published in the “Journal of Dental Education” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, April 22, 2013.

16. Risk Factor for Depression Can Be Contagious

A particular style of thinking which makes people vulnerable to depression — interpreting the causes of negative events as internal and stable — may actually infect roommates making them more vulnerable to depression six months later. This, according to research published by Gerald Haeffel and Jennifer Hames in the journal “Clinical Psychological Science” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, April 18, 2013.

17. People Present Themselves in Ways That Counteract Prejudices Toward Their Group

“Individuals from stigmatized groups choose to present themselves in ways that counteract the specific stereotypes and prejudices associated with their group”. This, according to a study by Rebecca Neel and her colleagues published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, April 17, 2013.

18. Extroverts and Introverts, Make Way for the Ambiverts

When it comes to who is likely to excel in sales—Extroverts or Introverts—the surprising answer is both! Research suggests that people who have a balance between Introverted and Extroverted tendencies may have the best of both types of people and end up surpassing both at pulling in more revenue. From “Psychology Today”, April 21, 2013.

19. 7 Myths About Happiness

According to happiness researcher Sonja Lyubomirsky, “Nearly all of us buy into what I call the myths of happiness—beliefs that certain adult achievements (marriage, kids, jobs, wealth) will make us forever happy and that certain adult failures or adversities (health problems, divorce, having little money) will make us forever unhappy. Overwhelming research evidence, however, reveals that there is no magic formula for happiness and no sure course toward misery. Rather than bringing lasting happiness or misery in themselves, major life moments and crisis points can be opportunities for renewal, growth, or meaningful change. Yet how you greet these moments really matters.” From “Psychology Today”, March 9, 2013.

20. Favorite Link Revisited: The Barnum Effect

The Barnum Effect Take this test to remind yourself why good personality tests should provide specific feedback…and why horoscopes are so much fun! This online test of 47 questions plus some background demographics gives the appearance of a legitimate personality test. Respondents receive the typical Barnum feedback and rate how accurate it is. The beauty of this on-line version is that students can change some of their answers and see that their description never changes. In the words of Prof. Birnbaum at Fullerton State who developed this page, “Self-validation is no validation”, according to the explanation given here.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 6, February, 2013

February 27, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,740 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Have you ever wondered what is all the fuss about the “Twilight” series? This month we are pleased to bring you a chapter from Donna Ashcraft’s new book “Deconstructing Twilight”. In it, she takes psychological and feminist approaches to understanding the characters. She and her publisher have graciously agreed to let “Personality Pedagogy” publish Chapter 7 from her book. Here, she analyzes Bella and her relationships with her parents and with Edward to illustrate aspects of Karen Horney’s theory. Ashcroft’s analysis is sure to spark discussion among your fan-students and to get you to think about young adult literature — and personality theories — in a new way.

This month, in honor of using fictional characters as case studies to illustrate personality theories, we revisit one of our favorite links. The NPR program “In Character” presents an in-depth look at more fictional characters suitable for analysis in your personality class.

Finally, I just couldn’t resist throwing in the “World’s Shortest Personality Test” (see link below). My students enjoyed taking it and critiquing it afterwards. We were able to draw on their “results” to see if it matched up to their personality according to a valid measure of the Five Factors. They could readily understand convergent validity and the need for criterion validity through this little demonstration. Try it!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Deconstructing Twilight

Drawing on classic theorists including Carl Jung, Karen Horney, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers and others, Donna Ashcraft takes a psychological and feminist approach to understanding the “Twilight” characters in her book “Deconstructing Twilight: Psychological and Feminist Perspectives on the Series”. Thanks to her publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., you can read and download a PDF of Chapter 7 in which she uses Karen Horney’s 10 neurotic needs to understand the dynamics between Bella and her parents, Bella and Edward, and more. The second link takes you to the Amazon.com page for her book.

3. World’s Quickest Personality Test

Are you imaginative, analytical, or suspicious? Richard Wiseman describes how to assess your personality via this quick measure. A fun way to introduce personality testing and the importance of validity to your students. (runs 1 minute, 26 seconds).

4. Men Are From Earth, Women Are From Earth

“From empathy and sexuality to science inclination and extroversion, statistical analysis of 122 different characteristics involving 13,301 individuals shows that men and women, by and large, do not fall into different groups” according to research by Bobbi Carothers and Harry Reis (2013) published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”. Includes a graphic comparing distributions of men and women on physical strength and masculinity-assertiveness; and a video of Harry Reis explaining their work and what it means (runs 3 minutes, 24 seconds).

5. Willpower Expert Roy Baumeister on Staying in Control

Roy Baumeister explains what willpower is, what depletes our willpower, and how we can manage our willpower to achieve our goals in this interview from “Time”, January 14, 2013.

6. Mistakes Improve Children’s Learning While Building Competence and Autonomy

We need not always protect children from mistakes; mistakes can be part of the learning and discovery process and actually increase learning. Children build competence through mastering challenges, and autonomy though trying new approaches.

7. How to Become Highly Skilled in CBT

“In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Drs. Aaron and Judith Beck discuss the process of improving as a therapist. Like most skills, excellent therapy skills are achieved over time with good training and experience. Dr. Aaron Beck emphasizes the importance of utilizing patient feedback, as well as learning from colleagues and supervisors. Dr. Judith Beck discusses the importance of keeping an open mind in one’s progression as a therapist, including incorporating new techniques from other fields of therapy within the CBT framework.” Published by the Beck Institute, January 16, 2013.

8. Design Your Own Implicit Association Tests (IAT)

Adam Meade, North Carolina State University, has created this website where researchers can create their own IATs using free open-source software on this website.

9. Research Methods and Statistics Concept Maps

Alexis Grosofsky, Beloit College, created these concept maps of topics typically covered in undergraduate methods and statistics courses. These maps will help students organize material and see the “bigger picture” of how these concepts relate to each other. Each of these 11 maps could be used as an introduction, summary, or quick refresher (opens in PDF format).

10. Teaching Statistics: Not Awful and Boring

Jessica Hartnett, Gannon University, started this blog where she shares online resources for teaching statistic to undergraduates. In her own words: “Most of [the suggestions] are funny. A few of them are serious but engaging. At no point will I suggest that you count M&M colors (although there is nothing wrong with that). Also, I’m not making any money off of this, I just know how hard it can be to teach statistics/research methods and thought I would share what I have.”

11. fMRI: Real-Time Self-Regulation of Emotion Networks

Using fMRI, 8 patients with depression were able to increase activity in areas of the brain related to positive emotion and lowered their depression through neuro(bio)feedback. A control group who went through similar cognitive strategies but without the feedback did not show such improvement. Includes downloadable slides of their findings.

12. Mindfulness neuroscience

Neuropsychologist Deric Bownds summarizes findings from a special issue of the journal “Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience” devoted to meditation and the brain. He describes four possible mechanisms by which meditation works and discusses the problem of control groups and random assignment in meditation research.

13. Do You Know What Determines Your Happiness?

Eric Karpinski, muses on the impact of genetics, external circumstances, and our own actions and thoughts on our happiness. Posted August 11, 2011.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: In Character: Tricksters, Vamps, Heroes, Scamps

“From Darth Vader to Scarlett O’Hara, the best fictional characters reflect something about who we are and how we got here.” In Character, “a [2008] six-month series from NPR, explores indelible American characters from fiction, folklore and pop culture.” Hear experts discuss the psychology of characters such as Vernon Waters (“A Soldier’s Story”), Willie Stark (“All the King’s Men”), Charlotte (“Charlotte’s Web”), Auntie Mame, Uncle Tom, Henry Fleming (“The Red Badge of Courage”), The Joker, Norman Bates, Nancy Drew, Jo March (“Little Woman”), King Kong, Mr. Spock, Carrie (“Sex and the City”), Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Ricky Ricardo, Charlie Brown, Fred Sanford, Indiana Jones, Dora the Explorer, Mama Rose, Hanibal Lecter, Portnoy, Eric Cartman (“South Park”), Walter Mitty, Catwoman, Blanche DuBois, Captain Ahab, Barbie, Harriet the Spy, Hester Prynne (“The Scarlet Letter”), Elmer Gantry, Darth Vader, Gordon Gekko (“Wall Street”), Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp, Cookie Monster, George Jefferson, Willy Loman (“Death of a Salesman”), Huckleberry Finn, Scarlett O’Hara, Pollyanna, Holden Caulfield, The Lone Ranger, Lassie, Bugs Bunny, and others.