Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 12, August 2015

August 12, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,202 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we have been continuing our summer housekeeping. We’ve been busy checking and updating each link on the site. To our dismay, we discovered that some links have disappeared entirely — especially videos (due to copyright infringements) and instructor’s class slides and web pages (probably due to retirement or changing jobs). This serves as a good reminder that any materials you use from the Internet may disappear or move so you should find a way to capture, print, copy, and/or download your favorites so that you can always have access to them.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Pixar’s “Inside Out” is a Surprisingly Accurate Look at Human Psychology —- Here’s What it Gets Right and Wrong.

Applies psychological theory and research to the movie “Inside Out” and describes what aspects of human psychology they got right (e.g., sleep consolidating memories, reframing memories, emotional complexity) what they got sort of right (e.g., core memories, personality islands) and what they just made up (e.g., imagination land). From “Business Insider”, June 23, 2015.

3. This Facial Expression Appears More Trustworthy To Others

According to research by Hehman, Flake, and Freeman (2015) in the “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here for PsyBlog, “A neutral face with a slightly upturned mouth and eyebrows makes people look more trustworthy, a new study finds. [But] the same neutral face with a slightly angry expression is seen as less trustworthy.”

4. This Fascinating TED Talk Shows Why You Have No Idea What Will Make You Happy in 10 Years

In his 2014 TED talk, Harvard social psychologist Daniel Gilbert explains “the end of history illusion” where “people are unable to anticipate just how much they’ll change in the future — even though they can appreciate how much they’ve grown in the past. So, at every age, you think the person you are today is the person you’ll be for the rest of your life.” Runs 6 minutes, 50 seconds.

5. CHIPTS: Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services

CHIPTS maintains this extensive list of links to 203 questionnaires for practitioners and researchers, many of them related to personality including:
Sub-Categories: Attachment, Coping Strategies, Health Efficacy, Life Outcomes, Mental Health, Perceived Vulnerability/Susceptibility, Personal Traits, Quality of Life, Religious/Spiritual, Self-efficacy, Sexual Attitudes, Social and much, much more.

6. College Social Life Can Predict Well-Being at Midlife

It’s well known that being socially connected promotes a person’s overall and psychological health. A new study now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 — and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 — can benefit her well-being later in life.

7. Your Musical Tastes Reflect Your Thinking Style

A study by David Greenberg and colleagues published in PLOS ONE, shows that the way someone thinks – his or her cognitive style – is a better predictor of the songs they’ll like than is their personality type. From Discover Magazine, July 24, 2015.

8. Keeping Up That Positive Feeling: The Science of Savoring Emotions

Savoring a beautiful sunset and the positive emotions associated with it can contribute to improved well-being, according to research. But why and how are some people better than others in keeping the feeling alive? From Science Daily, July 21, 2015.

9. The Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS)

The PANAS is based upon research demonstrating that self-reported mood states can be effectively classified on two dimensions. Each PANAS scale comprises ten specific mood-related adjectives rated on five-point scales of frequency over a two-week period.

10. State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)

The STAI is a validated 20 item self report assessment device which includes separate measures of state and trait anxiety. Recommended for studying anxiety in research and clinical settings.

11. Global Attachment: Relationship Scales Questionnaire (RSQ)

The RSQ is a 30-item questionnaire requiring participants to rate, on a 7-point scale, the extent to which each statement describes their characteristic style in close relationships (1 = not at all like me, 7 = very much like me). Items are summed to create two subscales, corresponding to the dimensions of avoidance and anxiety. Developed by Griffin, D., & Bartholomew, K. (1994).

12. Janis Self-Esteem Scale

Jannis, I. L., & Field, P. B. (1959). The Jannis and Field personality questionnaire. In C. I. Hovland & I. L. Jannis (Eds), Personality and persuasibility (pp. 300). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

13. The Pros and Cons of Being a Night Owl Instead of a Morning Person

While some research has found that early birds tend to have more positive social traits, such as optimism, night owls may have their own distinct advantages as well. From “Business Insider”, June 23, 2015.

14. Sexual Attitudes

Links to 8 measures of sexual attitudes including attitudes towards abstinence, sexual risks scale, sexual self-concept questionnaire and more.

15. How To Measure Circadian Rhythms in Humans

From Wirz-Justice, A. (2007). How to measure circadian rhythms in humans. Medicographia, 29(1), 84-90. Provides an overview of the topic with vivid examples and graphics. Opens in PDF.

16. How to Stop Procrastinating in 2 Easy Steps

Describes the work of Katy Milkman on “temptation bundling” in which behaviors we should do but procrastinate on are bundled with activities we’re tempted to do. Together, people are better able to exert their self-control to do what must be done and procrastinate less.

17. Researchers Discovered a Psychological Trick That Will Help You Stop Procrastinating
http://www.businessinsider.com/psychological-trick-to-stop-procrastinating-2015-7

“Psychologists have figured out a ridiculously easy trick to combat your tendency to put things off: Break them up into smaller pieces. The idea is that you’ll get a thrill out of checking those individual items off your to-do list and, before you know it, you’ll have completed the whole project.” From “Business Insider”, July 8, 2015.

18. College Social Life Can Predict Well-being at Midlife

It’s well known that being socially connected promotes a person’s overall and psychological health. A new study now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 — and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 — can benefit her well-being later in life. From “ScienceDaily”, July 23, 2015.

19. Research Suggests There are 4 Types of Introverts — Find Out Which Best Describes You

According to new research, there are four different kinds of introversion: social, thinking, anxious, and restrained. From “Business Insider”, July 1, 2015.

20. Exploring Bioethics

The National Institutes of Health provide this Curriculum Supplement on Exploring Bioethics for grades 9-12: “Students use a new model for ethical inquiry to develop thoughtful positions on complex bioethical issues. The supplement’s six modules each contain three 45-minute class periods of lessons on a specific issue.” Includes modules on balancing individual and community claims, allocating scarce resources, weighing benefits and harms of genetic testing, research ethics, and human responsibilities toward animals.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: How to Search APA’s Research Databases

Anne Breitenbach, APA Publications & Databases, put together this primer describing the host of free teaching tools for psychology research that are perfect for undergraduate students, [including] video tutorials, training webinars and reference guides that will help students learn how to efficiently search scholarly research databases, [and] website materials, podcasts and topic guides that will help them explore psychology and human behavior.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 11, July 2015

July 22, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,179 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you no doubt have heard of this summer’s hit movie “Inside Out”. This charming movie depicts life inside the head of 11-year old Riley focusing on her emotions personified by different characters and grounded in psychological theory and research.

Turns out, social-personality psychologist and emotion researcher Dacher Keltner is long time friends with Pixar director Pete Docter. The two became intrigued by the mysterious ways of emotions in their own kids (according to link #3 below). Keltner explains that pre-teens often experience a drop in happiness and a rise in anxiety. “It’s like the world crashes down on them,” Keltner said. The movie traces that shift, with tear-inducing as well as laugh-inducing effects.

Keltner was joined by facial expressions expert psychologist Paul Ekman in working with the Pixar team to portray childhood emotions, memory and character development in a scientifically sound way. The result speaks for itself. We here at Personality Pedagogy urge you to take you and your little friends to see this family-friendly movie, if you haven’t already done so.

Also new this month, it was announced that work has begun on a new film depicting Viktor Frankl’s account of his experience during the Holocaust. Frankl’s book “Man’s Search for Meaning” is being adapted by screenwriter Adam Gibgot. Gibgot explains, “The movie is about the best and worst of humanity, but how out of the worst the best can emerge.”

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Science of Sadness And Joy: ‘Inside Out’ Gets Childhood Emotions Right
The hit of the summer of 2015, “Inside Out”, depicts life for an 11-year old girl. Much of the film takes place inside her mind, in a control center staffed by five emotions personified: Joy, Sadness, Fear, and Disgust. Read about the science behind the movie and the contributions of psychologists Dacher Keltner and Paul Ekman who were consultants to the film.

3. ’Inside Out’ Movie Reflects the Realities and Fantasies of Neuroscience
Kids and the general public may be learning about how the brain and emotions work from an unlikely source: the hit movie “Inside Out” (2015). This article takes a look at the science behind the movie.

4. The Harry Potter Personality Test
According to a study published in the journal “Personality and Individual Differences” a person’s preferred Hogwart’s house from the fictional Harry Potter series may be related to their personality traits.

5. What it Means to Come Out in the Transgender Community
Inspired by the recent debut of Caitlyn Jenner on the June 2015 cover of “Vanity Fair” magazine, “Time” ran this article explaining that the process of coming out as a transgendered person is not linear; it varies from person to person. From “Time”, June 2, 2015.

6. Epigenetics and Its Major Influence on Life
In this essay James D. Baird explains how the science of epigenetics is finding that genes aren’t our destiny despite popular thinking. “Brain Blogger”, June 11, 2015.

7. Group Memberships Boost Self-Esteem More Than Friends Alone
“Belonging to multiple groups that are important to you boosts self-esteem much more than having friends alone” according to research published in PLOS ONE and summarized here for “ScienceDaily”, June, 2015.

8. Abraham Maslow: Father of Modern Management
Presents an overview of Maslow’s theories including the hierarchy of needs, self-actualization, theory Z, peak experiences; a summary of his books; quotes; and other resources.

9. Muppet Wiki: Walter Mischel
Muppet Wiki is a collaborative encyclopedia for everything related to Jim Henson, Sesame Street, The Muppet Show, and The Muppets Studio. It includes this page on Walter Mischel and features the musical sketch “Good Things Come to Those Who Wait” illustrating the concept of delay of gratification.

10. Awaken: Fritz Perls
Presents an overview of Perls’ life and theory including links to articles and videos.

11. Fritz Perls Treats People With Demons
The video includes Fritz Perls treating a man with a psychosis and a women with grief from parent issues. (Runs 31 minutes, 29 seconds).

12. Fritz Perls: Spiritual Training
Fritz Perls speaks about how to use your spiritual energy. (Runs 1 minute 18 seconds.)

13. Fritz Perls Gestalt Segment
Fritz Perls recites the Gestalt prayer. (Runs 8 minutes 16 seconds.)

14. Fritz Perls on Gestalt Therapy
Fritz Perls speaks to students about Gestalt therapy, the self and spirit. (Runs 6 minutes 49 seconds.)

15. Fritz Perls Workshop
Excerpt from a Fritz Perls workshop. (Runs 1 minute 37 seconds.)

16. Frederick Perls: A Son’s Reflections
From the webpage: “In celebration of the centennial of the birth of Frederick Perls, The Gestalt Journal invited his son Stephen, to address our Fifteenth Annual Conference on the Theory and Practice of Gestalt Therapy. Dr. Perls delivered this talk on the morning of April 23, 1993, at the Hotel du Parc in Montreal.”

17. The Gestalt Therapy Network
Includes digital forums for practitioners, students, and interested others; a directory of practitioners; and a comprehensive bibliography.

18. Night Owl or Morning Lark?
Should you pull an all-nighter or wake up early to study? This blog post reviews the evidence and concludes that it all depends on your chronotype.

19. The Perils of Novelty Seeking
World-class endurance athlete, coach, author, and political activist Christopher Bergland reviews the concept of Novelty Seeking, how it relates to the Big Five, and how sometimes the need for novelty may lead to extreme sports, ultra-endurance, and ultimately life-threatening experiences.

20. Desperately Seeking Sensation: Fear, Reward, and the Human Need for Novelty
“Sensation-seeking, the tendency to seek out novel experiences, is a general personality trait that has been extensively studied in psychological research, but neuroscience is just beginning to take aim at it.”

21. Novelty and the Brain: Why New Things Make Us Feel So Good
“We all like shiny new things, whether it’s a new gadget, new city, or new job. In fact, our brains are made to be attracted to novelty—and it turns out that it could actually improve our memory and learning capacity. The team at social sharing app Buffer explains how.” From LifeHacker, May 21, 2013.

22. Better Get to Work: Procrastination May Harm Heart Health
New evidence suggests that chronic procrastinators may be more vulnerable to serious health conditions like cardiovascular disease and hypertension. From the Association for Psychological Science, May 5, 2015.

23. Attachment Training
Alan Sroufe and June Sroufe provide information about attachment in the John Bowlby-Mary Ainsworth tradition and training in the assessment of attachment across the lifespan along with a primer on attachment theory, a list of suggested basic readings, and more.

24. An Attachment Primer: Fundamentals of Attachment Theory
Presents a brief overview of attachment theory.

25. Favorite Link Revisited: The British Museum of Science on Emotions
The British National Museum of Science has an extensive interactive web site. This online exhibit on recognizing emotions, emotions and the brain, faking emotional expression, animal emotions, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 12, August 2014

August 18, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,046 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month would be a good time to get moving on your upcoming fall classes. But if you are still in summer mode, then check out our links on procrastination below.

If, however, you are looking for inspiration for your classes including activities, textbooks, syllabi, and even ideas for first-day-of-class ice breakers, then check out The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, our featured Favorite Link Revisited this month brought to you by The Society for the Teaching of Psychology.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2.Getting Over Procrastination

Piers Steel, a researcher whose specialty is procrastination, explains how procrastination has been a problem since recorded time leading to lessened well-being, worse health, and lower salaries. So, why do we do it and how can we stop it? Steel shares some of his research findings in this piece by Maria Konnikova for “The New Yorker”, July 22, 2014.

3. Procrastination and Science

What do the Dalai Lama, Victor Hugo, St. Augstine and Margaret Atwood have in common? They are all procrastinators according to researchers Piers Steel, Rosa Hendijani and Chris Morin of the University of Calgary. They put together this web page to study procrastination and to link it to other aspects of personality. Includes links to the downside and the upside of procrastination, famous procrastinators, quotes about procrastination, personality tests, online polls, strategies to counter procrastination, and a summary of their latest research. Posted August 2014.

4. Procrastination Survey

You can sign up here to take the procrastination survey of researchers Piers Steel, Rosa Hendijani and Chris Morin of the University of Calgary and to participate in their ongoing research on procrastination.

5. Sometimes Early Birds Are Too Early

From the article: “Since the advent of the deadline, procrastinators have suffered society’s barbs for putting off until later what needs doing now. But it turns out that many people appear to be finishing things sooner than they need to get them done. They are “precrastinators,” researchers say. “ From “The New York Times”, July 19, 2014.

6. How Your “Locus of Control” Drives Your Success (and Stress)

Though generally people with an internal locus of control fare better in life, an extreme internal orientation can become a problem unless it is tempered by competence, self-efficacy, and opportunity or else people may become neurotic, anxious, and depressed. From “Business Insider”, July 30, 2014.

7. Mathematical Equation to Predict Happiness: Doesn’t Depend on How Well Things Go, But on Whether Things are Better Than Expected

“The happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide has been predicted by an equation developed by researchers at [University College, London], with results showing that moment-to-moment happiness reflects not just how well things are going, but whether things are going better.” From “ScienceDaily”, August 4, 2014.

8. Study Reveals “Unhappiest” Cities in the U.S.

“New research identifies the unhappiest cities in the U.S., but finds that some young people are still willing to relocate to them for a good job opportunity or lower housing prices. The analysis suggests people may be deciding to trade happiness for other gains.” From “ScienceDaily”, July 22, 2014.

9. How Much Does Happiness Cost in Your State?

According to ABC News “In a popular study by psychologist Daniel Kahneman and economist Angus Deaton, it was determined that the “magic income” is $75,000 a year. According to the study, as people earn more money, their day-to-day happiness (or “Emotional Well-Being”) rises.” They put together a map estimating how much it takes in each state to reach this idea level of income. In some states like Utah and Mississippi, it takes less, while in others, New York, Connecticut, and Hawaii, it takes much more. July 18, 2014.

10. How 14 Things That Happened To You In Childhood Shape You As An Adult

From attachment with caretakers to making one’s own decisions, to being spanked as a kid, there is evidence that these experiences from one’s childhood can affect personality in adulthood. From “Business Insider”, July 28, 2014.

11. Why Was Darth Vader So Evil? Blame His Lack of Parental Care, Say Psychologists

“Why was Darth Vader such a bad dude? According to a team of psychologists led by Peter Jonason, it’s down to his lack of parental care: the fact he was separated from his mother at age 9, and his father’s absence. The researchers believe such circumstances can catalyze the emergence of the Dark Triad of personality traits: Machiavellianism, Narcissism and Psychopathy. These traits are usually seen as negative, but Jonason and his colleagues believe they may be an adaptive response to tough early circumstances that signal to a child “life is bad”.” From “BPS Research Digest”, August 5, 2014.

12. How to Manage Both Extroverts and Introverts

Introverts and extroverts both bring assets to the workplace. Understanding what they are and how to manage them can help managers run a more productive and happy workplace. From “Business Insider”, July 10, 2014.

13. This Personality Trait Is The Most Important Driver Of Creative Achievement

According to research, the factor of Openness and its four constituent factors of explicit cognitive ability, intellectual engagement, affective engagement, and aesthetic engagement are related to creative work. From “Business Insider”, July 7, 2014.

14. One Simple Question Can Determine if You’re A Narcissist

According to Brad Bushman, “Narcissists aren’t afraid to tell you they’re narcissists” in this summary of his research here in “Business Insider”, August 6, 2014.

15. If Freud Worked Tech Support

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, produces a podcast about psychology called “The Psych Files”. In this episode (Episode 224) he presents a ”humorous way to learn about the Freudian defense mechanisms (actually elaborated by Anna Freud) of Displacement, Denial, Sublimation, Reaction Formation, and Projection. A little dream analysis thrown in. Who knows? Maybe Freud would have been good at tech support” (runs 4 minutes, and 8 seconds).

16. Favorite Link Revisited: The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) develops and distributes teaching and advising materials and provides services to teachers of psychology at all levels on behalf of The Society for the Teaching of Psychology. Look here for everything from copies of syllabi, how to write letters of recommendation, how to host an undergraduate research conference, to ethical issues and ice breakers with everything else in between.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 11, July, 2011

July 19, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,270 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are in full summer mode and the links below reflect our this: procrastinating, relaxing, contemplating the perfect summer day, and discussing the latest Harry Potter movie with friends. We’ll keep this newsletter short and sweet, to let you get back to your favorite summer activities.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Sleep type predicts day and night batting averages of Major League Baseball players

According to research presented by Christopher Winter at the Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, baseball players who are morning larks have a higher batting average than night owls for day games, but lower averages for night games.

3. Gender is Dead! Long Live Gender!

In this blog from NPR, Alva Noe draws on research on gender and gender differences which illustrates the power of social categories, identity, and stereotype threat in causing gender differences in personality. As real as these differences are in people’s everyday lives, Noe explains, they suggest that personality differences between the sexes are not innate and biological.

4. Researchers and Research Labs: Moffitt and Caspi

This extensive website of developmental psychology researchers Terrie Moffitt and Avshalom Caspi presents an overview of their research, links to publications, a section on what’s new, and more. Of particular interest is a special section on Gene X Environment effects, including empirical studies, theory and methods, public engagement, topics of debate, and summaries of their work suitable for classroom discussion.

5. This is Your Life (and How You Tell It)

Presents an overview of the work of Dan McAdams and others on how personality is revealed in the stories people tell about themselves. From ”The New York Times”, May 22, 2007.

6. Procrastination

Cartoonist Lev Yilmaz describes how his stuff (doesn’t) gets done in this entertaining video ”Tales Of Mere Existence: Procrastination”, to which many of us can relate.

7. Perfectionism: Impossible Dream

”Perfectionism may be hurting you in more ways than you think. Ultimately, productivity suffers” according to this old, but still relevant, summary from ”Psychology Today” from May 1, 1995.

8. The Many Faces of Perfectionism

A good overview of research findings on perfectionism which suggest that perfectionism is not adaptive and can contribute to depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and other problems. From the APA ”Monitor on Psychology”, Volume 34, Number 10, p. 18, November 2003, by Etienne Benson.

9. It’s Not Harry Potter

Rob Weir explains how to teach students to read journal articles by encouraging them to consider the following: purpose and reading strategy, main points and new claims, abstracts and introductions, habits of the writer, evaluating evidence, concrete examples, skimming and moving on and more.

10. Favorite Link Revisited: The Three Neurotic Personality Styles by Karen Horney

Do you know of characters who illustrate Karen Horney’s description of the three neurotic personality styles of compliant, aggressive, and detached? Here’s your change to contribute to ”Personality Pedagogy” by adding your suggestions to the table. You can also use the suggestions here to get your students thinking about Horney’s theory . . .  and also about their favorite characters from Harry Potter.