Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 2, October 2015

October 29, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,240  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, we bring you some fascinating links from many areas of personality, including how there may be an unintended side effect of deep brain stimulation (used to treat Parkinson’s and other diseases): personality change. Also, the “Science of Relationships” website has a fascinating psychoanalysis of sorts of Elsa and Anna, the sisters from the movie “Frozen”, suggesting that their rocky relationship may have been due to differing attachment styles. Finally, Dan Ariely, who’s psychoeconomic research always makes us think, presents a short video on how to encourage motivation at work. And at this point in the semester, who couldn’t use a little more motivation? If you’re in need of a smile, then check out the monkey selfies found under our Favorite Link Revisited.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Anxious-Avoidant Duos: Walking on Thin Ice in Relationships and Physical Health

Writing for “Science of Relationships”, Jena Lempke describes how Disney’s hit movie “Frozen” depicts how varying preferences for closeness in people with different attachments styles can lead to relationship problems. She describes how the friction between the sisters Elsa (with her avoidant attachment style) and Anna (with her anxious attachment style) was caused by their different attachment styles.

3. Personality Changes After Deep Brain Stimulation

“Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a well-known and accepted treatment for neurological and psychiatric diseases. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), DBS clearly improves patients’ symptoms, functionality and quality of life in the long run. Nevertheless, it seems that the electrodes do not have motor-specific functions. DBS influences mental states and personality and in some cases it can even lead to a “new personality”” by increasing impulsivity. From “Brain Blogger”, October 29, 2015.

4. What Pushes Us To Work Hard — Even When We Don’t Have To?

“Behavioral economist Dan Ariely says we work hard not because we have to, but because we want to. He examines the intrinsic values we need to feel motivated to work” in this TED talk from NPR, October 2, 2015. (runs 14 minutes and 52 seconds)

5. Erich Fromm on the Art of Loving and What Is Keeping Us from Its Mastery

“There is hardly any activity, any enterprise, which is started with such tremendous hopes and expectations, and yet, which fails so regularly, as love.” Read about Erich Fromm’s book “The Art of Loving” in this essay by Maria Popova for “BrainPickings”, October 29, 2015.

6. This Personality Trait Predicts Your Tendency to Lie and Cheat

“Researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau in Germany say that a sixth personality trait,” called honesty-humility, “can predict one type of behavior that none” of the usual five-factors can: dishonesty. From “Business Insider”, June 15, 2015.

7. Tested: Whether You Can Change Your Personality At Will

According to research by Hudson and Fraley (2015) and published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”, “people may be able to change their self-reported personality traits through volitional means, and represent a first step toward understanding the processes that enable people to do so.” This summary from “PsyBlog”, June 16, 2015.

8. What the Textbooks Don’t Tell You About Psychology’s Most Famous Case Study

“If you turn to many of the leading introductory psychology textbooks (American ones, at least), you’ll find the wrong answer, or a misleading account. Richard Griggs, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Florida, has just analysed the content of 23 contemporary textbooks (either released or updated within the last couple of years), and he finds most of them contain distortions, omissions and inaccuracies” when it comes to describing the life of Phineas Gage. British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, June 30, 2015.

9. What Holocaust Survivors Can Teach Us About Gratitude

Neuroscientists have gained new insights into how gratitude operates in the brain. Glenn Fox and his colleagues had participants read testimonies of Holocaust survivors while their brains were being scanned. They discovered that areas activated during moments of gratitude include processing reward, fairness, moral cognition, and self-reference. Published in the journal “Frontiers in Psychology”, and summarized here for “PsyBlog”, October 21, 2015.

10. Should We Genetically Screen Four-Year-Olds?

Would true equality in education mean testing children’s genetics at the age of four, so that any learning difficulties revealed can be accommodated right from the start of primary education? Hear Robert Plomin on the role genetics play in children’s success. From “The Guardian”, July 17, 2015. (audio interview; runs 42 minutes and 46 seconds).

11. Only When I Laugh: The Science of Laughter

Laughter overrides our usual vocal and physical control to make sounds we never normally hear in any other context. Read all about this intriguing response in “The Guardian”, July 6, 2015.

12. Favorite Link Revisited: Monkey Selfie

Monkey Hijacks Photographer’s Camera and Shots Self-Portraits While filming macaque monkeys in an Indonesian national park, photographer David Slater lost his camera to one of his subjects. The resulting self-portraits are both comical and all too human and illustrate nicely the question of self-recognition as a uniquely human capacity.

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 8, April 2015

April 30, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,139 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Though the semester is winding down around here, this newsletter brings you some of the latest links for teaching personality and keeping up with research findings in the field of personality. From Viktor Frankl to Neuroscience at the movies, from how much money MBTI types make to testing and attachment, there is sure to be something to inspire you below. Even if you are drowning in grading!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Neuro Psi Fi: The Brain Science Behind the Movies

Neuropsychologist Mary V. Spiers of Drexel University created and maintains this web page dedicated to show the brain science behind brain disorders and special abilities such as amnesia, autism, Tourette’s Syndrome, and others as illustrated in popular films. The page includes neuropsychological movie reviews in which the accuracy of the information portrayed in the film is evaluated in light of current research, and also brain resources, a blog, teaching resources, and more.

3. How We Elevate Each Other: Viktor Frankl on the Human Spirit and Why Idealism Is the Best Realism

In an excerpt from a 1972 lecture at the University of Toronto, Viktor Frankl “brimming with his humble wisdom and disarming wit… makes a beautiful case for believing in each other and viewing the human spirit with hope rather than cynicism.” Runs 4 minutes, 21 seconds.

4. The Weirdest Way People Communicate Their Happiness

Why is happiness so infectious? A new study published in the journal “Psychological Science” finds that people communicate their happiness to others through perspiration. Read about the study here in “PsyBlog”, April 17, 2015.

5. The Feeling That Expands Time and Increases Well-Being

Awe “that jaw-dropping moment when coming across something surprising, powerful, beautiful or even sublime can have a transformative effect” according to new research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here in “PsyBlog”, April 16, 2015.

6. 7 Science-Backed Signs You Work for a Narcissist

Research suggests that you are more likely to find a narcissist in the corner office than just about anywhere else. Find out why in this article from the “Business Insider”, April 27, 2015.

7. Is 10% of the Population Really Gay?

“Drawing on the widest survey of sexual behaviour since the Kinsey Report, David Spiegelhalter, in his book “Sex By Numbers”, answers key questions about our private lives. Here he reveals how Kinsey’s contested claim that 10% of us are gay is actually close to the mark”. From “The Guardian”, April 5, 2015.

8. The Personality Types That Make the Most Money

According to Truity Psychometrics, your Myers-Briggs personality type correlates with how much money you earn. Check out their graphic in “Business Insider”, April 20, 2015.

9. The Weird Psychological Reason Why Big Bonuses Can Demotivate Workers

“Given a choice between solving puzzles for free or for pay — which would you pick?” Based on Self-Determination Theory the answer may surprise you. Read about Autonomy and Competence here along with a third factor, Purpose, added by Daniel Pink. From “Business Insider”, April 7, 2015. You can hear Daniel Pink’s TED talk on the difference between incentivizing and intrinsic motivation here too (runs 18 minutes, 36 seconds).

10. Morning People (“Larks”) Are More Punctual Than “Owls”

Larks arrived more punctually than Owls to their morning lectures according to research published in “Current Psychology” and summarized here for The British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, March 16, 2015.

11. 3 More Reasons You Can’t Win With a Narcissist

A narcissist, a “profoundly selfish person who lacks empathy, makes you feel small and robs you of the happiness you deserve” can be difficult to deal with for these and other reasons. From “PsychCentral”, April 19, 2015.

12. People Are Overly Optimistic About the Benefits of Optimism

“This work doesn’t suggest that optimism is ineffective as a broad strategy for approaching life, or at helping us fulfill objectives at a broad scale. But it does suggest that we put more on the shoulders of optimism that it can bear” according to research published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” and summarized here for the British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, April 29, 2015.

13. Extraversion May Be Less Common Than We Think

New research suggests that Extrovert are over-represented in our social networks, which may overestimate the prevalence of extroversion in the population. This, according to research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here for “Science Daily”, April 6, 2015.

14. I (Don’t) Want 2 B w/ U: Texting, Sexting, and Avoidant Attachment

“Those who are high in avoidance tend to be uncomfortable with intimacy, want less closeness in their relationships, and distrust others more. And when it comes to electronic communication with partners, it turns out that avoidance also is related texting and sexting behaviors, but in different ways.” This, according to the Benjamin Le writing for “The Science of Relationships”, April 13, 2015.

15. Writing Exercises Scientifically Proven to Redirect Your Life

Inspired by the research of Timothy Wilson and others, writing exercises, like distancing yourself from negative experiences or determining what your best possible self looks like, may be beneficial according to Jane Porter writing for “Fast Company”, February 11, 2015.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: A Guide to Writing Learning Objectives for Teachers of Psychology (2012)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to announce this new resource for teachers by Guy A. Boysen of the State University of New York at Fredonia and McKendree University. The purpose of this 18-page resource is to assist psychology teachers in (a) understanding key terms related to objectives and their assessment, (b) writing behavior-based learning objectives, and (c) evaluating objectives once they are written. The resource includes a table that illustrates how various psychology outcomes can be addressed with objectives at various levels of Bloom’s taxonomy.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 7, March 2015

April 8, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,131 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The big news in the world of personality psychology is the opening of the Viktor Frankl Museum in his former residence in Vienna, Austria. The museum features exhibits, classes, lectures, and events. Check out the link below!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Viktor Frankl Museum

Frankl’s former residence in Vienna, Austria is now home to the Worldwide Viktor Frankl Museum. The museum features exhibits, classes, lectures, and events and “in the course of learning about the development of a genius, visitors also gain insight into their own opportunities and personal potential.”

3. Most Good People Have the Same Basic Life Story

“Psychology research verifies that the stories we tell ourselves matter. A new study from Northwestern University shows that folks who fit the classic mold of “good people” — those who care about others while also having high well-being and mental health — have life stories that share remarkably similar narrative arcs” according to research by Dan Mcdams and Jen Guo and summarized here for “Business Insider”, March 13, 2015.

4. Parents Make Nasty Little Narcissists?

Check out this research “that implies the Earth may have a few less narcissistic, self-centered personalities populating it if parents ditch overvaluing their child’s super-awesomeness to prevent them from potentially growing up into pedestal loving, manipulative, selfie-obsessed, nasty little narcissists” according to research by Eddie Brummelman and colleagues and summarized here by Carla Clark for “Brain Blogger”, March 9, 2015.

5. Men or Women? No Surprise Which Gender is More Narcissistic

Men are more narcissistic than women, on average, according to a new study published in the journal “Psychological Bulletin” by Emily Grijalva and colleagues and summarized here by Jeremy Dean for “PsyBlog”, March 5, 2015.

6. New Work Schedule Could Cure Your “Social Jetlag”

“Many of us are walking around all the time in a fog caused by ‘social jetlag.’ That’s what happens when we lose sleep because our daily schedules don’t match our bodies’ natural rhythms. The condition can be a particular problem for shift workers, who work into the night or on a shifting schedule. Now, researchers report that sleep and workers’ wellbeing could be improved if schedules took workers’ biological clocks into account.” This, according to new research by Till Roenneberg and published in the journal “Current Biology” and summarized here for “Science Daily”, March 12, 2015.

7. All About Awe: Science Explores How Life’s Small Marvels Elevate Cognition and Emotion

“The truly awesome encounters in life don’t reside in the everyday but rather in the experiences we have that are somehow magnificent and powerful. As cutting-edge research in psychological science is beginning to show […] that awe, though mysterious, is an emotion we shouldn’t take for granted, as it may have surprisingly meaningful consequences for everyday behavior and even overall well-being.” From The “APS Observer”, Volume 28 (4), April 2015.

8. An Upbeat Emotion That’s Surprisingly Good for You

“A new study singles out one surprising emotion as a potent medicine: awe. And happily, awe seems to be much easier to come by than many might expect, even for the busy and stressed-out. This, according to research by Dacher Keltner and colleagues published in the journal “Emotion” and summarized here for the New York Times, March 26, 2015.

9. The Lifetime Effects of Self-Control in Childhood

“In following a cohort of individuals from birth to their late 30s, Terrie Moffitt and her colleagues found that children who scored low on a variety of self-control measures at age 3 were more likely as adults to have criminal records, addictions, welfare dependency, low financial savings, bad credit ratings, and health problems compared with those who scored high on self-control as toddlers.” Watch her keynote address at the inaugural International Convention of Psychological Science in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, March 13, 2015 in this video. Runs 49 minutes and 2 seconds.

10. Favorite Link Revisited: Viktor Frankl

e-Textbook From the electronic textbook created for undergraduate and graduate courses in Personality Theories by George Boeree of Shippensburg University.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 3, November, 2013

November 30, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,905 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

As we in the United States celebrate Thanksgiving by reflecting on all that we are thankful for, it only seems fitting that we here at Personality Pedagogy share our gratitude with you. This month we are particularly grateful for new scales to add to our extensive online collection of legitimate personality questionnaires, Google (and their “doodle” honoring Herman Rorschach in particular), selfies, a certain fox who says things, and, of course, you, our loyal readers.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Scholarly Reflections On The ‘Selfie’

Oxford dictionaries choose ’selfie’ as their Word of the Year 2013. To celebrate, several scholars from different fields shared their thoughts selfies including psychologists Robert Arkin and Mark R. Leary.

3. Psychoanalytic Perspective Illustrated: Bless You Hawkeye

Jill Payne, George Mason University via the PsychTeach discussion list, suggested that the episode of the TV series M*A*S*H titled “Bless You Hawkeye” (1981) “nicely illustrates some Freudian constructs. The tone of the episode is serious–not derisive–and emotional as well.” In this episode (Season 9, Episode 17), Hawkeye develops a sneeze, which cannot be explained by an allergy or other medical condition. Eventually, the psychiatrist, recurring character Sidney Freedman, is brought in to talk to him and they discover the root of his problem lies in an event from childhood triggered by a specific smell. The episode illustrates Freudian concepts such as reaction formation, psychosomatic symptoms, importance of childhood memories, slips of the tongue, repressed memory, stream of consciousness, and talk therapy. The entire episode runs about 24 minutes, but you could cut the first two scenes (before the Psychiatrist interviews Hawkeye) and the final scene (the Poker game) if time is an issue. If the link above does not work for you, try searching for it elsewhere on the Internet. See a synopsis of the episode here: http://aftermash.blogspot.com/2009/11/episode-211-bless-you-hawkeye.html.

4. Openness to Experience and Creative Achievement

Summarizes research by Scott Barry Kaufman, identifying four factors of Openness/Intellect: Affective Engagement, Aesthetic Engagement, Intellectual Engagement, and Explicit Cognitive Ability. Each factor relates slightly differently to creative achievement in arts and sciences. He concludes that “These results support the need to separate different forms of cognitive engagement when trying to predict creative achievement. Different forms of engagement are related to different modes of information processing. What’s more, people differ in their drive to engage in various aspects of the human experience, and these drives are related to different forms of creative achievement.” From “Scientific American”, November 25, 2013.

5. The Evolution of Beauty

Back in 1959 geneticist Dmitry Belyaev started an experiment in Russia in which he bred silver foxes to make them tamer, and thus easier to raise for their prized fur. However, selecting for friendly behavior had the unanticipated result of also selecting for certain facial features. The result is that the same hormones which regulate behavior also regulates physical development. But even more amazing is the implication that beauty and an even temperament and friendliness also co-occur in humans. Read all about the findings in this fascinating article from “The Economist”, November 16, 2013.

6. The Paradoxical Traits Of Resilient People

Entrepreneur Faisal Hoque, writing for “Leadership Now” argues that resilient people, those who are able to bend but not break during adversity, possess the paradoxical traits of control, acceptance, and using adversity to change for the better.

7. The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS-X)

The PANAS-X, contains 60 items measuring general positive and negative affect and 11 specific affects including fear, sadness, guilt, hostility, shyness, fatigue, surprise, joviality, self-assurance, attentiveness, and serenity. This link is to the manual by David Watson and Lee Anna Clark (1994). Opens in PDF format. Also available in a Japanese version here: http://www2.psychology.uiowa.edu/faculty/Clark/J-PANAS.pdf

8. The Gratitude Questionnaire — Six Item Form (GQ-6)

“The GQ-6 is a short, self-report measure of the disposition to experience gratitude. Participants answer 6 items on a 1 to 7 scale (1 = ‘strongly disagree’, 7 = ‘strongly agree’). Two items are reverse-scored to inhibit response bias. The GQ-6 has good internal reliability, with alphas between .82 and .87, and there is evidence that the GQ-6 is positively related to optimism, life satisfaction, hope, spirituality and religiousness, forgiveness, empathy and prosocial behavior, and negatively related to depression, anxiety, materialism and envy. The GQ-6 takes less than 5 minutes to complete, but there is no time limit.” From McCullough, M. E., Emmons, R. A., & Tsang, J. (2002). The Grateful Disposition: A conceptual and Empirical Topography. “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82”, 112-127.

9. Gratitude Resentment and Appreciation Test (GRAT) Revised and Short Forms

According to Watkins et al. (2003), “A grateful person would not feel deprived in life, they would have a sense of abundance […] acknowledge the contribution of others to their success and well-being, […] appreciate life’s simple pleasures, and […] acknowledge the importance of experiencing and expressing gratitude. Their conceptualisation of gratitude was shown to correlate with measures of subjective well-being and positive affect. The revised GRAT consists of 44 items measuring these characteristics. The short-form GRAT consists of 16 items. Both scales are rated on a nine point scale from I strongly disagree to I strongly agree with the statement”. From Watkins, P. C., Woodward, K., Stone, T., & Kolts, R. L. (2003). Gratitude and happiness: Development of a measure of gratitude, and relationship with subjective well-being. “Social Behavior & Personality: An International Journal, 31”, 431-452.

10. Gratitude Resentment and Appreciation Test (GRAT)

Watkins, P. C., Woodward, K., Stone, T., & Kolts, R. L. (2003). Gratitude and happiness: Development of a measure of gratitude, and relationship with subjective well-being. “Social Behavior & Personality: An International Journal, 31”, 431-452. Opens in PDF format.

11. Herman Rorschach’s 129 Birthday Google Doodle

On November 8, 2013, “Google” honored Swiss psychologist Hermann Rorschach with a shape-changing doodle reminiscent of the famous personality test with his name (and controversial validity and reliability).

12. Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Sciences.

Maintained by the National University of Ireland, Galway, this site is “designed to be a repository for instruments that are used to collect data from across the social sciences. Please use the site to discover instruments you can use in you own research. We now have more than 500 instruments concerned with a wide range of topics (e.g. autism, health, pain). You can use the search function above to search the database using pre-identified key words, or generate your own terms to search the instrument titles.” Researchers are welcome to submit any scales, questionnaires, and instruments that they have developed in an easy to use wiki-like format. See the site for details.

13. Sense of Belonging Increases Meaningfulness of Life

“[B]elonging to a group provided meaning over and above the value of others or the help they could provide. It’s more than just bonding, therefore, but really feeling like you are fitting in with others which is associated with higher levels of meaningfulness. Just the reverse effect has been shown in previous studies. People who feel excluded from social groups tend to feel that life has less meaning”, according to new research by Lambert et al. (2013) and summarized here in “PsyBlog”, November 25, 2013.

14. 10 Things You Should Know About Goals

“Your brain is a goal-setting machine, and research is illuminating why”, according to this article in “Psychology Today”, October 22, 2013.

15. You’re So Self-Controlling

Is our sense of time, not our lack of willpower, the real issue? While we generally think that delay of gratification is a good thing, research on decision making by Joseph Kable and Joseph McGuire suggests that since the timing of real-world events is often unpredictable, giving up can be a rational response to a time frame that is off. From “The New York Times”, November 16, 2013, by Maria Konnikova.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: Five-Ful Envelopes

In this activity, by Barbara Frederickson, participants explore the positive emotions of hopeful, joyful, peaceful, playful, and thankful, and brainstorm ways of increasing the frequency and intensity of these positive emotions in their lives. From the January 2010 issue of the Thiagi Gameletter (Seriously fun activities for trainers, facilitators, performance consultants, and managers, see their website: http://www.thiagi.com/).


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 12, August, 2013

August 27, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,837 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Special thanks go out this month to Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast. In illustrating a new tool called “Storify” (see Storify.com) for the Psych News discussion list for teachers of high school psychology, he pointed out three real-world examples of how forced ranking systems for employee assessment may backfire. We have added them to “Personality Pedagogy” under Assessment.

In addition, to herald the end of summer and the beginning of a new year and a new semester, we present three new links for teaching and leaning: Teaching Chance, Teaching Ethics, and The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University and we revisit the Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning. These later two resources contain everything you need to know about teaching and learning from designing syllabi, to ideas for what to do the first day of class to how to assess students’ learning and your teaching. We hope that you will find something here to inspire you to try something new and make this year a great one!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Other People Matter: Three International Positive Psychology Association Tributes to Chris Peterson

Nansook Park, Barbara Fredrickson, and Martin Seligman each gave moving tributes to the late Christopher Peterson at the Third World Congress of the International Positive Psychology Association. Their talks are summarized here in “Positive Psychology News Daily”, July 26, 2013.

3. 10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier

Grounded in research, these activities including practicing gratitude, controlling counter-factual thinking and others may be used to spark discussion or to introduce topics in stress, resilience, cognition, emotion, and positive psychology.

4. Optimists Better at Regulating Stress

“It’s no surprise that those who tend to see a rose’s blooms before its thorns are also better at handling stress. But science has failed to reliably associate optimism with individuals’ biological stress response — until now” according to “Science Daily”, July 23, 2013, summarizing research by Joelle Jobin and Carsten Wrosch published in “Health Psychology”.

5. Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung on Human Personality in Rare BBC Interview

Maria Popova of “Brain Pickings” introduces this video: “On October 22 of 1959, BBC’s Face to Face — an unusual series of pointed, almost interrogative interviews seeking to “unmask public figures” — aired a segment on Jung […] Eighty-four at the time and still working, he talks to New Statesman editor John Freeman about education, religion, consciousness, human nature, and his temperamental differences with Freud, which sparked his study of personality types”. Includes a transcript of the highlights. (Runs 39 minutes, 28 seconds).

6. 6 Things You Thought Wrong About Introverts

The “Huffington Post,” July 28, 2013, presents this list of 6 common misconceptions about introverts based on stereotypes.

7. Acceptance of What Can’t Be Changed Is Key To Satisfaction In Later Life, Research Shows

“When it comes to life satisfaction in one’s later years, the ability to accept what cannot be changed is equally important to the feeling of being able to exert control over one’s life” according to research published in the “Journal of Happiness Studies” and summaries here in the “Huffington Post”, July 12, 2013.

8. Scientific Literacy in a Psychology Curriculum Module (2013)

“The authors describe 9 scientific literacy activities to teach Introductory Psychology students how to read original research reports, critically and thoroughly evaluate secondary research reports, and analyze the utility of each. A 25-page document describes the activities without answers for instructors, a 34-page booklet provides students with the materials they need, and 148 slides contain material without answers that instructors can use in class. Versions with answers to students’ assignments are available to members after logging into STP’s website.” Find the link under the INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY category.

9. Seeing Narcissists Everywhere

Jean M. Twenge, author of “Generation Me” and “The Narcissism Epidemic” talks about her research and the high rate of narcissism today compared to earlier generations in this interview with the “New York Times”, August 5, 2013.

10. Detachment

Virginia Hughes, writing for “Aeon Magazine” describes the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, in which Romanian orphans living in orphanages were randomly assigned to foster care or to stay in the orphanage. Preliminary results suggest that children raised in foster care showed gains in IQ, healthier psychological development, better motor skills, different EEG brainwave patterns when looking at emotional faces, and more white matter than children left in orphanages. This fascinating study, begun in 2000 and continuing today, raises ethical, social, and political questions as it vividly demonstrates the power of social interaction and attachment. Published July 29, 2013.

11. Who Feels Treated Unfairly After Taking An Assessment?

Researchers Laura Honkaniemi, Taru Feldt, Riitta-Leena Metsäpelto, and Asko Tolvanen identified three personality types who differ in their Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness. They found that people hold different perceptions of the fairness of personality testing depending on their personality type: Overcontrolled, Undercontrolled, Resilient, or Bohemian according this summary published in the “British Psychological Society Research Digest”, August 1, 2013.

12. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Worksheets

Free downloadable cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) worksheets, formulations, and self-help resources including blank formulations, thought records, cognitive restructuring worksheets, diaries/data gathering sheets, mechanisms, information sheets, techniques/procedures, useful tools, forgiveness tools, and formulations for specific disorders, all in PDF format.

13. Stacked (Forced) Ranking

From Michael Britt at “The Psych Files”: “Here’s a sound byte from an episode of TWIT (This Week in Technology: http://twit.tv/twit) podcast in which Leo Laporte and John Dvorak discuss the negative effects of a performance appraisal system often called Stacked or Forced ranking. Psychologists refer to scales like this as ordinal scales”. From July 15, 2012, show #362. (This audio clip runs 1 minute, 55 seconds).

14. Forced Ranking: The Poisonous Employee-Ranking System That Helps Explain Microsoft’s Decline

Writing for “Slate Magazine”, Will Oremus, on August 23, 2013 claims that “Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer oversaw a system called “stack ranking,” in which employees on the same team competed directly with one another for money and promotions. Critics say this rewarded brown-nosing and sabotage”.

15. Microsoft’s Lost Decade Due to Forced Ranking Appraisal Systems

Kurt Eichenwald argues that a forced ranking system may have had negative effects on Microsoft’s corporate culture. From “Vanity Fair”, August 2012.

16. Chance

J. Laurie Snell of Dartmouth College presents this page of resources for teaching a course in probability and statistics including videos, audios, syllabi, activities, computer simulations, data sets, links to internet resources, and a Teacher’s Guide for teaching a quantitative literacy course.

17. The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation

The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University presents this extensive online resource which features resources to help new and established faculty design and teach a course, incorporate technology, assess teaching and learning, apply principles of teaching and learning, and more.

18. Teaching Ethics to Undergraduate Psychology Students (TEUPS)

TEUPS is a centralized location for faculty looking for ideas for activities, articles, books, associations, videos, films, lectures, and other resources that are related or could be useful in incorporating ethics into the undergraduate psychology curriculum. This website will be an invaluable resource for those interested in following APA recommendations regarding the teaching of ethics as presented in the Principles for Quality Undergraduate Education in Psychology (2011) and the Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major (2007).

19. Favorite Link Revisited: U.C. Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning

U.C. Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning presents this compendium of classroom-tested strategies and suggestions designed to improve the teaching practices of all college instructors, including beginning, mid-career, and senior faculty members. The page features links to teaching tools that cover both traditional practical tasks–writing a course syllabus, delivering an effective lecture–as well as newer concerns such as technology and online learning.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 3, November, 2012

December 1, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,700 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we discovered a bunch of really amazing videos to illustrate concepts in personality psychology from compassion and resilience to sexual identity to positive psychology and lots more. We’ve even re-run one of our all-time favorites just in time for the holiday season.

Speaking of the holidays, we’ve even got the latest trend in toys, or at least in advertising for toys: gender neutral ads. An affiliate of Toys “R” Us in Sweden has a series of photos in which girls are seen playing with guns and building toys while boys vacuum and iron.

As your semester winds down, we hope you find some good links in this newsletter to get you through.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
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2. Gender Neutral Advertising in the Toys “R” Us Catalog in Sweden
“Scandinavian toy retailer Top-Toy, a licensee of the Toys “R” Us brand, has made a bold move in its Swedish catalog this year, working to do away with the guns-for-boys, dolls-for-girls gender system that is a mainstay of the industry. Instead, its catalog is trying to be gender-neutral, reflecting Sweden’s national focus on equality in the workplace and in society.” Check out some of these new images posted by the “Wall Street Journal,” November 29, 2012.

3. The Science of Compassion and Resilience
Psychologist David DeSteno examines the science of compassion and resilience exploring new ideas for “leveraging the mechanisms of the mind that enable them” according to Maria Popova of “Brain Pickings”, October 22, 2012. Runs 18 minutes, 28 seconds.

4. Positive Psychology Teaching Tools
The 19 page resource, by Grant J. Rich, describes collections of readings, edited volumes, and handbooks that might supplement positive psychology textbooks as well as more specialized texts that could supplement seminars on specific positive psychology topics.  Such topics include work, religion, creativity, personality and character strength, health, and development.

5. Sexual Identity, Sexual Orientation, and Sexual Behavior
The “Science of Relationships” blog, written by psychologists, presents this short primer on the differences between the three in the spirit that “understanding will lead to less hate”. Posted October 21, 2012, runs 3 minutes, 49 seconds.

6. What is Positive Psychology? An Animation
According to Nick Standlea, of “Positive Psychology Daily News:” “If you’ve ever struggled to explain positive psychology to a friend or colleague, you are ready to appreciate this short animation by Nick Standlea, a former research associate for Mike Csikszentmihalyi at the Quality of Life Research Center. It’s food for the eyes and ears.” October 31, 2012.

7. Web Center for Social Research Methods
Developed and maintained by William M. K. Trochim of Cornell University, the Web
Center consists of four parts. The Knowledge Base provides information on research design, measurement, and data analysis; Selecting Statistics is an expert system designed to help students determine the most appropriate
statistical analysis for their data; The Simulation Book provides
simulations of common research designs; and Concept Mapping is a guide
to that process.

8. APA Module on Research Methods, Measurement, and Statistics
Stephen Chew “presents on topics such as research methods and measurements used to study behavior and mental processes, ethical issues in research with human and nonhuman animals, and basic concepts in data analysis”. Runs 60 minutes.

9. How to Search APA’s Research Databases
Anne Breitenbach, APA Publications & Databases, put together this primer describing the “host of free teaching tools for psychology research that are perfect for undergraduate students, [including] video tutorials, training webinars and reference guides that will help students learn how to efficiently search scholarly research databases, [and] website materials, podcasts and topic guides that will help them explore psychology and human behavior.”

10. Interactive Teaching Activities for Introductory Biopsychology
The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) presents these Interactive Teaching Activities for Introductory Biopsychology. This resource by Stephanie L. Simon-Dack “describes 11 simple, interactive activities for biopsychology courses to engage students and illuminate core neurophysiological concepts.  Each activity requires little or no outlay of resources;  most can be implemented in the classroom and take only 10-15 min of class time”. Published November 2012.

11. Personality Theory Lecture Notes
Everett Waters, SUNY Stony Brook, teaches PSY 345: Personality. Check out his course materials here, including his syllabus, readings, slides, and lecture notes on Freud, Jung, Adler, Erikson, Maslow, and Attachment theory.

12. Why Students Love Evolutionary Psychology
“Why Students Love Evolutionary Psychology… and How to Teach It,”by David Buss. Discusses evolutionary psychology — such topics as sexual selection, evolved psychological mechanisms and ultimate and proximate causation — and tools for teaching evolutionary psychology in the classroom. This is one of 7 videos from the APA Education Directorate’s series Videos for Psychology Teachers. The videos are recordings of sessions from the 2012 APA Convention in Orlando, Fla. (runs 45 minute).

13. Introversion Explained via Cartoons
Introvert Chuck Schallhorn, at Teaching High School Psychology, posted these resources about what introverts are like in real life. Included are these 10 visuals and cartoons describing in an often humorous way what it introversion is, and how to interact with introverts if you are an extrovert.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: Psych Elves
Michael Britt, of the Psych Files Podcast, had the temerity to turn these three personality psychologists into Elves. Can you identify them?


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 2, October, 2012

October 29, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,598 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are greatly saddened to learn of the untimely death of Christopher Peterson. Peterson, among the 100 most cited psychologists, was an inspiring teacher and creative researcher and advocate in the field of positive psychology, which he once described as the”scientific study of what makes life most worth living.” Read more about his life and work here and check out our first and last links below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than “Personality Pedagogy”.

2.The Good Life

In tribute to Christopher Peterson, a founding father of the positive psychology movement, “Psychology Today” put together this special online issue highlighting the life and legacy of Christopher Peterson, research pioneer, colleague, and teacher.

3. Careers in Psychology

A resource for students who are interested in pursuing a career in the field of psychology. The site has career and licensure info, jobs, internships, and commentary by experts — some of the top psychologists in the world — and more.

4. The Marshmallow Study Revisited

This classic measurement of children’s self-control was replicated and updated in a study published in Cognition this month and summarized here, October 11, 2012. Children who experienced reliable interactions immediately before the marshmallow task waited on average four times longer — 12 versus three minutes — than youngsters in similar but unreliable situations. Includes photos and video from the study, and a graph of results.

5. Persuasive Messages Tied to Personality

The “Eclipse Writer Blog” presents a summary of the research by Hirsh et al. (2012) which found that advertising was more effective when it was tailored to the levels of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness of the target audience. Includes some interesting suggestions on how to apply these findings to advertising. See also Hirsh, Jacob, Sonia Kang and Galen Bodenhausen, Personalized Persuasion: Tailoring Persuasive Appeals to Recipients’ Personality Traits, “Psychological Science”, 30 April 2012.

6. The Bem Sex Role Inventory

According to the site: “The Bem Sex Role Inventory was developed in 1971 by Dr. Sandra Lipsitz Bem. It characterizes your personality as masculine, feminine, androgynous, or undifferentiated. The BSRI is based on gender stereotypes, so what it’s actually measuring is how well you fit into your traditional sex role. Thus, your score may say as much about how our cultural expectations have changed over the last 35 years as it does about your personality.” You can take the original 60-item scale and receive your scores automatically online here.

7. Teampedia: Tools for Teams

Teampedia is a “collaborative encyclopedia of free team building activities, free icebreakers, teamwork resources, and tools for teams that anyone can edit!
This site is designed for a wide audience including: team leaders, trainers, teachers, managers, camp directors, counselors, and youth groups.”

8. Understanding That You’ll Never Be Perfect

Writer Therese J. Borchard muses on what it’s like to live with perfectionism and finally learn to let it go.

9. Pupil Dilation Reveals Sexual Orientation

“Pupils were highly telling: they widened most to videos of people who participants found attractive, thereby revealing where they were on the sexual spectrum from heterosexual to homosexual”, according to research published in PLoS ONE and summarized here, in “Science Daily,” August 6, 2012.

10. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy Video Toolkit

This toolkit consists of seven videos, up to 16 minutes each, with accompanying worksheets and information, on “Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy” (MBCT) by Jay Uhdinger.

11. Is it Better to be an Introvert or an Extrovert?

Blogger Erik Barker summarizes research on the strengths and weaknesses of introverts and extroverts.

12. Was Freud Wrong? Are Dreams the Brain’s Start-Up Test?

“Measurements taken from sleeping people explain, at least in part, why dreams tend to have such bizarre but vivid story lines. The findings deal a blow to the Freudian interpretation of dreams but leave open the possibility that some useful personal meaning can be extracted from them. The main purpose of dreams, however, the authors of the new study believe, is to test whether the brain has had enough sleep and, if so, to wake it up”, according to this article by Nicholas Wade in “The New York Times”.

13. Happiness Equals Love

George Vaillant explores and explains the data behind his finding that “The only thing that really matters inline are your relationships to other people”. From “Positive Psychology Daily News”, July 16, 2009.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: Positive Psychology Center

The Positive Psychology Center has extensive resources including summary of current research, sample syllabi, high school curriculum, online research participation, and extensive bibliography.