Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 11, July, 2010

July 28, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 11, July, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and the approximately 2,107 other interesting links related to personality, please visit Personality Pedagogy:

Anybody going to APA next month? We are! If you happen to see Marianne at a Division Two: Society for the Teaching of Psychology event, please introduce yourself and say hi.

This month we found some very interesting links on bioethics — ethical issues raised by scientific findings in genetics, neuroscience, and other biological fields. Thanks to reader/visitor Nathan Grimm for pointing this out to us. We also catch up on podcasts with Dr. Dave on Jung’s Red Book, and meditation and the brain. Perhaps, my favorite link this month is the site with web apps for the 21st century, with links to just about any tool you could imagine and many, many, which I’ll bet you never knew you needed.

We also are clearing out our inbox and (finally!) adding links that have been mentioned by folks on the PsychTeacher discussion list in recent and not-too-recent months. One of the best is a compilation of over 600 happy songs. Think of it as your soundtrack to a happy rest-of-the-summer!

I guess I better end this introduction here before you discover my personality profile on the Five Factor Model from my writing (see link below)!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the top right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino at arcadia dot edu

1. A Guide to Bioethics Resources on the Web

Advances in biology, technology, and medicine raise new ethical questions, about human dignity and the rights of individuals especially when it comes to end-of-life care, organ transplants, abortion, euthanasia, animal rights, population control, genomics and other topics. Nathan Grimm compiled this extensive list of resources for teaching and learning about bioethics including sites in Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe, and the United Kingdom.

2. Psychopharmacology and the Self

From the website: ”The development of psychotropic drugs has stimulated a renewed interest in questions about what constitutes “the self” and one’s personality. Does an authentic, static, and incorrigible self exist? Do antidepressants alter, enhance, or corrupt the authentic self? Is cognitive enhancement possible and desirable, and if so, is it ethical?” This module, prepared by the High School Bioethics Project at the University of Pennsylvania, takes students and teachers on an exploration of the impact of psychotropic drugs on our understanding of the self, including the use of stimulants such as Ritalin and Adderall, drugs often used by students as study aids. Includes a downloadable pdf filled with group projects, individual activities, teacher-directed classroom discussion, case study, and references. Written for high school students, much of the information can be revised for use in some college classes.

3. Neuroethics Curriculum module

From the website: ”Although bioethics has been around for more than four decades, the field of neuroethics is in its infancy. Philosophers have developed several conceptual frameworks that contain valuable insights concerning the analysis of questions of right and wrong, good and bad. These ethical theories can help us as we struggle with the moral dilemmas presented to us by advances in brain science.” Includes a downloadable pdf filled with group projects, individual activities, teacher-directed classroom discussion, case study, and references. Written for high school students, much of the information can be revised for use in some college classes.

4. Psychology Today Genetic Crossroads Blog: An ”Inborn Talent Genetic Test”? Unlikely.

For Jesse Reynolds, Project Director on Biotechnology Accountability at the Center for Genetics and Society, one test captures much of what’s wrong with personal genetics testing. Read his view here, which includes links to some controversial uses of genetic testing like genetic testing in China, Berkeley’s testing of incoming freshmen, and the Food and Drug Administration’s halting of genomic test kits in Walgreens.

5. Your Family ”Type” Can Affect Your Kids At School

The way a family interacts at home can affect how kids do in school, a study suggests today in the journal ”Child Development” by Melissa Sturge-Apple and colleagues and summarized in this article from ”USA Today”, July 14, 2010. The researchers identified three kinds of families: cohesive, disengaged, and enmeshed families. Children from disengaged families started school with the most problems, showing aggressive behavior and trouble cooperating. Children from enmeshed families entered school without problems, but later developed anxiety, loneliness, and alienation. On average, children from cohesive families showed the fewest problems.

6. The Meditating Brain With Richard Davidson

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #231, February 26, 2010). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Richard J. Davidson, Research Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry and Director of the W.M. Keck Laboratory for Functional Brain Imaging and Behavior, the Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience and the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison about the impact of meditation on the brain.

7. The Red Book of C. G. Jung with Nancy Furlotti

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #231, February 26, 2010). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Jungian Analyst and past president of the Jung Institute of Los Angeles, Nancy Furlotti about the recently-published ”Red Book” of Carl Jung, which she was instrumental in helping to publish. In this book, Jung describes his own experience with the unconscious and the individuation process towards greater wholeness as reflected in mythological symbols.

8. Web 2.0/21st Century Tools

This site provides links and reviews of web tools for educators including audio file management, bookmarking, charts/graphs, digital art, digital storytelling, file conversion, file sharing, photo editing, presentation/slideshow, project management, search engines, social networks, survey/polls, timelines, webQuests, word processing, video/screencasting and more. Most of the sites are open source and free.

9. The Links Between Bloggers’ Personalities and Their Use of Words

According to a content analysis of 694 blogs by Tal Yarkoni, people use different words depending on their personality. ”More neurotic bloggers used more words associated with negative emotions; extravert bloggers used more words pertaining to positive emotions; high scorers on agreeableness avoided swear words and used more words related to communality; and conscientious bloggers mentioned more words with achievement connotations.” This summary from the ”British Psychological Society’s Research Digest Blog”, July 12, 2010, original article published as: Yarkoni, T. (2010). Personality in 100,000 Words: A large-scale analysis of personality and word use among bloggers. ”Journal of Research in Personality, 44 (3)”, 363-373

10. Identical Strangers Explore Nature vs. Nature

Paula Bernstein and Elyse Schein were identical twins who were separated at birth and met 35 years later as identical strangers. In the course of researching the history of their birth and adoption, they discovered that they were part of a secret research project in which identical twins, particularly those of mothers with mental illness, were raised separately to asses the relative influence of nature and nurture. This NPR story describing their amazing story includes a photo gallery of the twins growing up. Based on their book ”Identical Strangers” (Random House, 2007). From ”All Things Considered”, NPR, October 25, 2007.

11. Letters from African-American Women

”The Duke University Libraries has had a long-standing reputation for their digitization projects, and this collection is certainly one of their best. This particular segment of their work focuses on the lives of African-American women, and it contains the full-text memories of Elizabeth Johnson Harris, slave letters from Hannah Valentine, and a rather unusual stand-alone letter from Vilet Lester. Hannah Valentine was born in 1867 to former slaves, and visitors can read her 85-page handwritten memoir here. In her memoir, she talks about the importance of religion in her life, and there are also a few poems by her as well. The letters from Hannah Valentine, a house slave, reveal a rare firsthand glimpse into the lives of slaves in Virginia. Finally, the very unique letter from Vilet Lester offers just a slight, but revealing glimpse, into her life in Bullock County, Georgia in 1857. [KMG]” (Copyright 2010 Internet Scout Project – http://scout.wisc.edu The Internet Scout Project, located in the Computer Sciences Department at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, provides Internet publications and software to the research and education communities under grants from the National Science Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon foundation, and other philanthropic organizations. Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of any of our publications or web content provided this paragraph, including the above copyright notice, is preserved on all copies.)

12. Erik Erikson’s 8-Stages Hoedown

Undergraduate Matthew Volkmann made this video for his Ed Psych class at the University of Iowa. In it, he describes Erikson’s stages of identity development. The video runs 5 minutes, 20 seconds and starts with a loud scream. P.S. Matthew proudly reports that he got an A on this project!

13. Harry Harlow Studies on Isolation in Monkeys

Excerpt from a movie on attachment showing how newborn baby monkeys, separated from their mothers, when given a choice between a cold wire mother with milk or a soft mother without, chose comfort over food. Early separation led to social problems as these monkeys grew up, demonstrating the importance of contact with a caregiver.
(1 minute, 11 seconds)

14. 7 TAT Cards 7

While this blogger suggests that we use these images for a writing assignment, astute visitors will recognize these as cards from the original Thematic Apperception Test by Henry A. Murray and Christiana D. Morgan.

15. Positive Psychology of Music – Over 600 Positive Songs

According to John Schinnerer, on his ”Guide To Self” website, ”Music has a powerful and profound impact on how we feel and think. If we are to approach Dacher Keltner & Barbara Fredrickson’s 3:1 Positivity ratio (3 times as much positive emotions as negative), we must surround ourselves with positive messages, planting tiny seeds throughout each day. This is a list of over 600 positive and elevating songs (in terms of tempo, lyrics, and/or timbre) compiled by Dr. John Schinnerer. June 2009.” Opens directly in PDF format.

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 9, May, 2010

May 29, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 9, May, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

For some of us, the spring semester is just behind us and the start of summer is just ahead, and for others, well, we’ve got another month (at least!) of school. And then there’s summer school!

As we head into the first weekend of summer, check out the links below. This month we feature 4 resources on testing and assessment and 6 audio/visual resources. The assessment sites should give you some interesting examples how principles of good testing are used in hiring, training, and development of the workforce today. The audio/visual links run the gamut from a disabled man explaining what self-determination means to him to Michael Britt of the Psych Files describing his favorite apps for the iPad/iPod/iPhone to the men of the hit TV series Glee singing about stereotyping and social pressures placed on women.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (“Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. Teaching High School Psychology Blog

A blog for teachers of high school psychology, both advanced placement and introduction to psychology, moderated by Kent Korek, Steve Jones, Rob McEntentarffer, Chuck Schallhorn, and Trevor Tusow. Contains resource, ideas, announcements, musings, and other cool stuff related to teaching psychology in high schools.

2. Research Methods Knowledge Base

William M.K. Trochim, Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University is the author of The Research Methods Knowledge Base, a “comprehensive web-based textbook that addresses all of the topics in a typical introductory undergraduate or graduate course in social research methods. It covers the entire research process including: formulating research questions; sampling (probability and nonprobability); measurement (surveys, scaling, qualitative, unobtrusive); research design (experimental and quasi-experimental); data analysis; and, writing the research paper.”

3. Testing and Assessment: A Guide to Good Practices for Workplace Investment Professionals

This pamphlet, created by the U.S. Department of Labor in 2006, provides this overview to help career counselors and development professionals implement good assessment practices and legal standards for hiring, training, and career development of their workforce.

4. Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Inc.

The home page of APA Division 14 includes background information about employment testing including questions to ask before purchasing a test, introductory modules for I-O psychology, Master’s and PhD guidelines, graduate training programs, and more. Check out their background information on employment testing, including types of employment tests, statistics on the number of companies using employment tests, test formats and other information related to testing.

5. Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Teaching Wiki
http://siopwiki.wetpaint.com/

The SIOP Teaching Wiki features sample syllabi, in-class exercises, movies and video clips, case studies, teaching tips, links and more, contributed by other instructors for use in I-O Psychology courses.

6. Trust and Hormones

Oxytocin, the “trust hormone” appears to increase our trust in others, even momentarily lowering our distrust of strangers. But what happens to people who are born with a genetic syndrome in which they are unable to regulate oxytocin? Hear this fascinating story of a 9-year-old girl with Williams Syndrome and current research on oxytocin and trust (including trust in government) in this feature from “All Things Considered” on National Public Radio, April 22, 2010 (runs 8 minutes, 36 seconds).

7. Transference, Countertransference, and Other Guidelines for Psychotherapy

Michael Britt, former professor of psychology, produces a podcast about psychology called The Psych Files. In this episode (Episode 12) he “discuss[es] the importance of boundaries and guidelines set forth by Robert Langs, MD regarding how to know when your relationship with your therapist is healthy — and when it is not.” (runs 34 minutes, and 8 seconds).

8. Psychology Apps for the iPad/iPhone/iPod

Michael Britt, former professor of psychology, produces a podcast about psychology called The Psych Files. In this episode (Episode 121) he shows — using his iPad — the 10 apps he considers to be the best for psychology, including credible therapy apps, mind mapping tools, relaxation apps, games based on Gestalt principles, and 3-D brain imaging apps.

9. Prenatal Testosterone and Finger Ratio

Can you predict the winner of an athletic contest by looking at finger ratios? John Manning explains how finger length ratio reflect prenatal hormone exposure which is also related to athletic ability in this short video from the BBC program “Secret of the Sexes” (runs 6 minutes, 8 seconds).

10. Materialism and Low Self-Esteem

Research by Lan Nguyen Chaplin (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign) and Deborah Roedder John (University of Minnesota) suggests that low self-esteem causes increased materialism and raising self-esteem decreases materialism in adolescents, according to this summary in “Science Daily”, November 16, 2007.

11. What Self-Determination Means to Me

The Self-Determination for Texas project promotes the principles of self-determination for people with disabilities and those who support them. These principles include Freedom, Authority, Support, Responsibility and Confirmation. In this video, Ricky Broussard, who has been in institutional care for most of his life, describes what self-determination means to him: The right to have control over decision making power to live where he wants, have family and friends to visit or spend the night, choose what he wants to eat and hire and fire the people that work with him (from November 2, 2004, runs 3 minutes, 28 seconds).

12. What it feels like for a girl?

The men from the hit TV series “Glee” sing this very moving rendition of the Madonna hit describing the pressures that women feel to “be a little less.” Check out the lyrics here (runs 4 minutes, 32 seconds).