Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 2, October, 2012

October 29, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,598 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are greatly saddened to learn of the untimely death of Christopher Peterson. Peterson, among the 100 most cited psychologists, was an inspiring teacher and creative researcher and advocate in the field of positive psychology, which he once described as the”scientific study of what makes life most worth living.” Read more about his life and work here and check out our first and last links below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than “Personality Pedagogy”.

2.The Good Life

In tribute to Christopher Peterson, a founding father of the positive psychology movement, “Psychology Today” put together this special online issue highlighting the life and legacy of Christopher Peterson, research pioneer, colleague, and teacher.

3. Careers in Psychology

A resource for students who are interested in pursuing a career in the field of psychology. The site has career and licensure info, jobs, internships, and commentary by experts — some of the top psychologists in the world — and more.

4. The Marshmallow Study Revisited

This classic measurement of children’s self-control was replicated and updated in a study published in Cognition this month and summarized here, October 11, 2012. Children who experienced reliable interactions immediately before the marshmallow task waited on average four times longer — 12 versus three minutes — than youngsters in similar but unreliable situations. Includes photos and video from the study, and a graph of results.

5. Persuasive Messages Tied to Personality

The “Eclipse Writer Blog” presents a summary of the research by Hirsh et al. (2012) which found that advertising was more effective when it was tailored to the levels of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness of the target audience. Includes some interesting suggestions on how to apply these findings to advertising. See also Hirsh, Jacob, Sonia Kang and Galen Bodenhausen, Personalized Persuasion: Tailoring Persuasive Appeals to Recipients’ Personality Traits, “Psychological Science”, 30 April 2012.

6. The Bem Sex Role Inventory

According to the site: “The Bem Sex Role Inventory was developed in 1971 by Dr. Sandra Lipsitz Bem. It characterizes your personality as masculine, feminine, androgynous, or undifferentiated. The BSRI is based on gender stereotypes, so what it’s actually measuring is how well you fit into your traditional sex role. Thus, your score may say as much about how our cultural expectations have changed over the last 35 years as it does about your personality.” You can take the original 60-item scale and receive your scores automatically online here.

7. Teampedia: Tools for Teams

Teampedia is a “collaborative encyclopedia of free team building activities, free icebreakers, teamwork resources, and tools for teams that anyone can edit!
This site is designed for a wide audience including: team leaders, trainers, teachers, managers, camp directors, counselors, and youth groups.”

8. Understanding That You’ll Never Be Perfect

Writer Therese J. Borchard muses on what it’s like to live with perfectionism and finally learn to let it go.

9. Pupil Dilation Reveals Sexual Orientation

“Pupils were highly telling: they widened most to videos of people who participants found attractive, thereby revealing where they were on the sexual spectrum from heterosexual to homosexual”, according to research published in PLoS ONE and summarized here, in “Science Daily,” August 6, 2012.

10. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy Video Toolkit

This toolkit consists of seven videos, up to 16 minutes each, with accompanying worksheets and information, on “Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy” (MBCT) by Jay Uhdinger.

11. Is it Better to be an Introvert or an Extrovert?

Blogger Erik Barker summarizes research on the strengths and weaknesses of introverts and extroverts.

12. Was Freud Wrong? Are Dreams the Brain’s Start-Up Test?

“Measurements taken from sleeping people explain, at least in part, why dreams tend to have such bizarre but vivid story lines. The findings deal a blow to the Freudian interpretation of dreams but leave open the possibility that some useful personal meaning can be extracted from them. The main purpose of dreams, however, the authors of the new study believe, is to test whether the brain has had enough sleep and, if so, to wake it up”, according to this article by Nicholas Wade in “The New York Times”.

13. Happiness Equals Love

George Vaillant explores and explains the data behind his finding that “The only thing that really matters inline are your relationships to other people”. From “Positive Psychology Daily News”, July 16, 2009.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: Positive Psychology Center

The Positive Psychology Center has extensive resources including summary of current research, sample syllabi, high school curriculum, online research participation, and extensive bibliography.

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 11, July, 2011

July 19, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,270 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are in full summer mode and the links below reflect our this: procrastinating, relaxing, contemplating the perfect summer day, and discussing the latest Harry Potter movie with friends. We’ll keep this newsletter short and sweet, to let you get back to your favorite summer activities.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Sleep type predicts day and night batting averages of Major League Baseball players

According to research presented by Christopher Winter at the Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, baseball players who are morning larks have a higher batting average than night owls for day games, but lower averages for night games.

3. Gender is Dead! Long Live Gender!

In this blog from NPR, Alva Noe draws on research on gender and gender differences which illustrates the power of social categories, identity, and stereotype threat in causing gender differences in personality. As real as these differences are in people’s everyday lives, Noe explains, they suggest that personality differences between the sexes are not innate and biological.

4. Researchers and Research Labs: Moffitt and Caspi

This extensive website of developmental psychology researchers Terrie Moffitt and Avshalom Caspi presents an overview of their research, links to publications, a section on what’s new, and more. Of particular interest is a special section on Gene X Environment effects, including empirical studies, theory and methods, public engagement, topics of debate, and summaries of their work suitable for classroom discussion.

5. This is Your Life (and How You Tell It)

Presents an overview of the work of Dan McAdams and others on how personality is revealed in the stories people tell about themselves. From ”The New York Times”, May 22, 2007.

6. Procrastination

Cartoonist Lev Yilmaz describes how his stuff (doesn’t) gets done in this entertaining video ”Tales Of Mere Existence: Procrastination”, to which many of us can relate.

7. Perfectionism: Impossible Dream

”Perfectionism may be hurting you in more ways than you think. Ultimately, productivity suffers” according to this old, but still relevant, summary from ”Psychology Today” from May 1, 1995.

8. The Many Faces of Perfectionism

A good overview of research findings on perfectionism which suggest that perfectionism is not adaptive and can contribute to depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and other problems. From the APA ”Monitor on Psychology”, Volume 34, Number 10, p. 18, November 2003, by Etienne Benson.

9. It’s Not Harry Potter

Rob Weir explains how to teach students to read journal articles by encouraging them to consider the following: purpose and reading strategy, main points and new claims, abstracts and introductions, habits of the writer, evaluating evidence, concrete examples, skimming and moving on and more.

10. Favorite Link Revisited: The Three Neurotic Personality Styles by Karen Horney

Do you know of characters who illustrate Karen Horney’s description of the three neurotic personality styles of compliant, aggressive, and detached? Here’s your change to contribute to ”Personality Pedagogy” by adding your suggestions to the table. You can also use the suggestions here to get your students thinking about Horney’s theory . . .  and also about their favorite characters from Harry Potter.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 8, April, 2010

April 20, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 8, April, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Have you done your spring cleaning yet? Here at Personality Pedagogy, we’ve been doing some cleaning up of our own. This month we have (finally!) posted some interesting links that we’ve been meaning to get to, on all sorts of topics from Narrative Psychology to Neuroscience to Viktor Frankl to Barbie (!). We even found some new links to personality tests to feed what may already be the largest collection of links to legitimate personality tests on the internet! All in all, this is our biggest issue this year.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog: https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ You can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (“Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. How to Interpret Brain Imaging Studies

The Neuroethics Learning Collaborative, of the Center for Neuroscience and Society at the University of Pennsylvania, created this video on Brain Imaging: Reality and Hype. Jeff Aguirre presents this talk on the basics of neuroimaging, focusing on how scientists go from tracking neural activity to making an inference about human behavior. Describes how PET scans and fMRIs work, and how to interpret results from fMRI studies. The talk was given on March 2, 2010 and runs 47 minutes and 10 seconds.

2. The Voodoo Debate

On the heels of the famous Ed Vul, Nancy Kanwisher and Hal Pashler paper ”Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience,” Matt Lieberman and Piotr Winkielman continued the debate at the annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Social Psychologists (SESP) in 2009. The first link is to the video of their debate; this link to background information about the original paper which started the controversy.

3. Viktor Frankl

Article from the ”MacMillan Encyclopedia of Death and Dying” by James W. Ellor (2003) on the life and work of Viktor Frankl.

4. Viktor Frankl ”Man Alive” (1977)

Frankl discusses his theories and his message of hope as an antidote to the problem of meaninglessness in this two-part interview from the 1977 TV program ”Man Alive” in Part 1 (4:28) and Part 2 (4:23).

5. Barbie says: ”Math class is tough”

This video presents the original 1992 Teen Talk Barbie saying the controversial phrase ”Math class is tough”. The company later dropped the phrase and apologized after criticism from the American Association of University Women in its report on how schools shortchange girls. This link is to the original story in The New York Times, October 21, 1992.

6. Gender and Race Equity in Math, Science, and Technology

Patricia B. Campbell, of Campbell-Kibler Associates, does research and evaluation to increase gender and race equity in math, science, and technology education. She has turned her findings into user-friendly reports, brochures, and pamphlets available on their site to view, download, print, and share with parents, educators, and children. Topics include Myths, Stereotypes, and Gender Differences; No Virginia, There is No Math Gene; Making It Happen: Pizza Parties, Chemistry Goddesses and Other Strategies that Work for Girls and Others; and much, much more.

7. The Snyder (1974) Self-Monitoring Scale

Mark A. Whatley, Valdosta State University, has posted selected personality tests for his Self and Identiy class. About the Self-Monitoring Scale he says: ”Developed by Mark Synder (1974), the Self-Monitoring (SM) Scale measures the extent to which you consciously employ impression management strategies in social interactions. Basically, the scale assesses the degree to which you manipulate the nonverbal signals that you send to others and the degree to which you adjust your behavior to situational demands. Some people work harder at managing their public images than do others. ” Scale and scoring instructions available here.

8. Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ; 1978)

Mark A. Whatley, Valdosta State University, has posted selected personality tests for his Self and Identiy class. About the Personal Attributes Questionnaire he says: ”Devised by Janet Spence and Robert Helmreich (1978), the PAQ assesses masculinity and femininity in terms of respondents’ self-perceived possession of various traits that are stereotypically believed to differentiate the sexes. The authors emphasize that the PAQ taps on limited aspects of sex roles: certain self-assertive or instrumental traits traditionally associated with masculinity and certain interpersonal or expressive traits traditionally associated with femininity. Although the PAQ should not be viewed as a global measure of masculinity and femininity, it has been widely used in research to provide a rough classification of participants in terms of their gender-role identity.” Scale and scoring instructions available here.

9. Self-Handicapping Scale

Mark A. Whatley, Valdosta State University, has posted selected personality tests for his Self and Identiy class. About the Self-Handicapping Scale he says: ”Self-handicapping refers to people’s engagement in behaviors that hinder performance in an effort to provide an excuse if they fail. Rhodewalt, Saltzman, & Wittmer (1984) have used this scale to effectively predict the performance of competitive athletes. You and others should find the responses to the items on this scale interesting. Question 4 on the scale must be reverse scored. Higher scores indicate greater self-handicapping. High self-handicappers compared to low self-handicappers are likely to engage in activities that protect themselves from an attribution that they are failures. If they do fail, then they can attribute their failure to the situation and not to their ability. ” Scale and scoring instructions available here.

10. Psychological Tests for Student Use

Ron Okada, York University, Toronto, maintains this handy page for his students conducting research. It contains scales and scoring instructions for many tests relevant for both social and personality psychology. The tests are available in PDF or Word 2002 formats for the downloading. Tests available include the Attitude Towards Women Scale, Authoritarianism-Rebellion Scale, Body Esteem, Loneliness Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Personal Attributes Questionnaire, Procrastination Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Aggression Questionnaire, Trust Scale and much more.

11. Evolution: What Does it Mean to Be Human?

This web page provides background information for the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History’s exhibit ”What Does it Mean to Be Human?” Describes ongoing research projects and evidence on the evolution of human behavior and physical characteristics. The site features a 3D interactive image library of fossils and artifacts, interactive walk-through of the exhibit, and resources for educators including lesson plans for 6-12 on human evolution, genetics, and more.

12. 10 Steps to Conquer Perfectionism

”Here are 10 techniques I use to break out of the prison of perfectionism in order to live and create as freely as I can in an imperfect world” according Therese Borchard, for PsychCentral.

13. Mating Strategies Not Universal

Summarizes the results of a cross-cultural study which found ”that men and women in monogamous societies, such as Pitcairn Islanders, and some polygynous societies, including the Aka in the Central African Republic, have overlapping ranges of number of offspring.” This finding suggests that there is greater variation in reproductive strategies than was once thought, so the tendency for men to be promiscuous and for females to be selective may not be universal. From Science News, May 23, 2009.

14. Genetic Risk for Anxiety Does Not Have to Be Destiny

Gene-by-environment interactions that place some people at risk for depression, anxiety disorders and alcohol abuse may not be the whole story. Monkeys with a gene which puts them at risk for aggression and anxiety were raised either in small or large group cages. While the monkeys raised in small groups were more likely to be aggressive and anxious, monkeys reared in large, social cages were protected from developing these problems. From ”Science Daily”, May 3, 2009.

15. Meditation May Increase Gray Matter

”Certain regions in the brains of long-term meditators were larger than in a similar control group. Specifically, meditators showed significantly larger volumes of the hippocampus and areas within the orbito-frontal cortex, the thalamus and the inferior temporal gyrus — all regions known for regulating emotions”. From ”Science Daily”, May 13, 2009

16. What’s Your Story? The Psychological Science of Life History Research

Jesse Bering describes life history research in which ”how we “spin” our self-narratives can reveal our hidden personalities” in this essay for ”Scientific American”, May 5, 2009.

17. Don’t!

Describes the classic work of Walter Mischel on delay of gratification research, including interviews with the now grown-up participants of the original marshmallow studies. ”Children who are able to pass the marshmallow test enjoy greater success as adults.” ”The New Yorker”, May 18, 2009, by Jonah Lehrer.