Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 11, July 2015

July 22, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,179 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you no doubt have heard of this summer’s hit movie “Inside Out”. This charming movie depicts life inside the head of 11-year old Riley focusing on her emotions personified by different characters and grounded in psychological theory and research.

Turns out, social-personality psychologist and emotion researcher Dacher Keltner is long time friends with Pixar director Pete Docter. The two became intrigued by the mysterious ways of emotions in their own kids (according to link #3 below). Keltner explains that pre-teens often experience a drop in happiness and a rise in anxiety. “It’s like the world crashes down on them,” Keltner said. The movie traces that shift, with tear-inducing as well as laugh-inducing effects.

Keltner was joined by facial expressions expert psychologist Paul Ekman in working with the Pixar team to portray childhood emotions, memory and character development in a scientifically sound way. The result speaks for itself. We here at Personality Pedagogy urge you to take you and your little friends to see this family-friendly movie, if you haven’t already done so.

Also new this month, it was announced that work has begun on a new film depicting Viktor Frankl’s account of his experience during the Holocaust. Frankl’s book “Man’s Search for Meaning” is being adapted by screenwriter Adam Gibgot. Gibgot explains, “The movie is about the best and worst of humanity, but how out of the worst the best can emerge.”

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Science of Sadness And Joy: ‘Inside Out’ Gets Childhood Emotions Right
The hit of the summer of 2015, “Inside Out”, depicts life for an 11-year old girl. Much of the film takes place inside her mind, in a control center staffed by five emotions personified: Joy, Sadness, Fear, and Disgust. Read about the science behind the movie and the contributions of psychologists Dacher Keltner and Paul Ekman who were consultants to the film.

3. ’Inside Out’ Movie Reflects the Realities and Fantasies of Neuroscience
Kids and the general public may be learning about how the brain and emotions work from an unlikely source: the hit movie “Inside Out” (2015). This article takes a look at the science behind the movie.

4. The Harry Potter Personality Test
According to a study published in the journal “Personality and Individual Differences” a person’s preferred Hogwart’s house from the fictional Harry Potter series may be related to their personality traits.

5. What it Means to Come Out in the Transgender Community
Inspired by the recent debut of Caitlyn Jenner on the June 2015 cover of “Vanity Fair” magazine, “Time” ran this article explaining that the process of coming out as a transgendered person is not linear; it varies from person to person. From “Time”, June 2, 2015.

6. Epigenetics and Its Major Influence on Life
In this essay James D. Baird explains how the science of epigenetics is finding that genes aren’t our destiny despite popular thinking. “Brain Blogger”, June 11, 2015.

7. Group Memberships Boost Self-Esteem More Than Friends Alone
“Belonging to multiple groups that are important to you boosts self-esteem much more than having friends alone” according to research published in PLOS ONE and summarized here for “ScienceDaily”, June, 2015.

8. Abraham Maslow: Father of Modern Management
Presents an overview of Maslow’s theories including the hierarchy of needs, self-actualization, theory Z, peak experiences; a summary of his books; quotes; and other resources.

9. Muppet Wiki: Walter Mischel
Muppet Wiki is a collaborative encyclopedia for everything related to Jim Henson, Sesame Street, The Muppet Show, and The Muppets Studio. It includes this page on Walter Mischel and features the musical sketch “Good Things Come to Those Who Wait” illustrating the concept of delay of gratification.

10. Awaken: Fritz Perls
Presents an overview of Perls’ life and theory including links to articles and videos.

11. Fritz Perls Treats People With Demons
The video includes Fritz Perls treating a man with a psychosis and a women with grief from parent issues. (Runs 31 minutes, 29 seconds).

12. Fritz Perls: Spiritual Training
Fritz Perls speaks about how to use your spiritual energy. (Runs 1 minute 18 seconds.)

13. Fritz Perls Gestalt Segment
Fritz Perls recites the Gestalt prayer. (Runs 8 minutes 16 seconds.)

14. Fritz Perls on Gestalt Therapy
Fritz Perls speaks to students about Gestalt therapy, the self and spirit. (Runs 6 minutes 49 seconds.)

15. Fritz Perls Workshop
Excerpt from a Fritz Perls workshop. (Runs 1 minute 37 seconds.)

16. Frederick Perls: A Son’s Reflections
From the webpage: “In celebration of the centennial of the birth of Frederick Perls, The Gestalt Journal invited his son Stephen, to address our Fifteenth Annual Conference on the Theory and Practice of Gestalt Therapy. Dr. Perls delivered this talk on the morning of April 23, 1993, at the Hotel du Parc in Montreal.”

17. The Gestalt Therapy Network
Includes digital forums for practitioners, students, and interested others; a directory of practitioners; and a comprehensive bibliography.

18. Night Owl or Morning Lark?
Should you pull an all-nighter or wake up early to study? This blog post reviews the evidence and concludes that it all depends on your chronotype.

19. The Perils of Novelty Seeking
World-class endurance athlete, coach, author, and political activist Christopher Bergland reviews the concept of Novelty Seeking, how it relates to the Big Five, and how sometimes the need for novelty may lead to extreme sports, ultra-endurance, and ultimately life-threatening experiences.

20. Desperately Seeking Sensation: Fear, Reward, and the Human Need for Novelty
“Sensation-seeking, the tendency to seek out novel experiences, is a general personality trait that has been extensively studied in psychological research, but neuroscience is just beginning to take aim at it.”

21. Novelty and the Brain: Why New Things Make Us Feel So Good
“We all like shiny new things, whether it’s a new gadget, new city, or new job. In fact, our brains are made to be attracted to novelty—and it turns out that it could actually improve our memory and learning capacity. The team at social sharing app Buffer explains how.” From LifeHacker, May 21, 2013.

22. Better Get to Work: Procrastination May Harm Heart Health
New evidence suggests that chronic procrastinators may be more vulnerable to serious health conditions like cardiovascular disease and hypertension. From the Association for Psychological Science, May 5, 2015.

23. Attachment Training
Alan Sroufe and June Sroufe provide information about attachment in the John Bowlby-Mary Ainsworth tradition and training in the assessment of attachment across the lifespan along with a primer on attachment theory, a list of suggested basic readings, and more.

24. An Attachment Primer: Fundamentals of Attachment Theory
Presents a brief overview of attachment theory.

25. Favorite Link Revisited: The British Museum of Science on Emotions
The British National Museum of Science has an extensive interactive web site. This online exhibit on recognizing emotions, emotions and the brain, faking emotional expression, animal emotions, and more.

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 8, April, 2012

April 22, 2012

Hello and welcome to the sixty-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,495 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, we welcome a new site for teachers of psychology: Making Connections. Funded by a grant from the Association for Psychological Science (APS) Fund for Teaching and Public Understanding of Psychological Science, Susan Goldstein established this site ”to provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum.” The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources; pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies; and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues. Check it out at http://makingconnections.redlands.edu.

Also this month, we just discovered — and perhaps you are ahead of us in this — a photo stream on Flickr posted by ”Psychology Pictures”. This stream features graphics of thought-provoking psychology-related quotes printed over striking photos. The result are some very inspiring images that will liven up a slide presentation, a web site, or even your office door. The site also features photos of famous psychologists, should you be looking for one of those.

Finally, for those of you who could use some comic relief at this point in the semester that happens to be personality-related, check out http://make-everything-ok.com/. This ”button” promises to make everything better, but just in case it doesn’t, it urges you to check your perceptions, a good entree into the cognitive perspective with your students.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Making Connections

Susan Goldstein of the University of Redlands established and maintains this site to: ”provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum.” The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources; pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies; and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues.

3. Psychology Pictures Photostream on Flickr

This Flickr photostream features graphics of thought-provoking psychology-related quotes printed over striking photos. The result are some very inspiring images that will liven up a slide presentation, a web site, or even your office door. The site also features photos of famous psychologists.

4. Childhood Adversity Can Lead to Genetic Changes

”Childhood adversity may lead to epigenetic changes in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene, an important regulator of the biological stress response that may increase risk for psychiatric disorders” according to research published in ”PLoS ONE” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, February 29, 2012.

5. Helping Children to Succeed

”Children may perform better in school and feel more confident about themselves if they are told that failure is a normal part of learning, rather than being pressured to succeed at all costs” according to research published in the ”Journal of Experimental Psychology” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, March 13, 2012.

6. Self-Regulation: Video Talk by Roy Baumeister

Roy Baumeister presents this talk to the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, an organization committed to finding innovative practical solutions to today’s social challenges, explaining why ”willpower and self-control is one of the most important aspects of individual and societal wellbeing” (runs 15 minutes and 50 seconds).

7. Carl Jung’s Five Key Elements to Happiness

In 1960, when asked by a journalist, ”What do you consider to be more or less basic factors making for happiness in the human mind?”, Jung identified these five elements.

8. A Jungian Approach to Fairy Tales

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #293, February 3, 2012). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Tom Elsner about fairy tales and their interpretation from a Jungian perspective.

9. The Situation of Ability: Gender Differences in Mental Rotation Deconstructed

In this article by Scott Barry Kaufman from the ”Huffington Post” (1/9/2012) he takes a look at the standard mental rotation task and considers the role of spatial ability, expectations, confidence, and stereotype threat on gender differences in this ability.

10. Revising Your Story

Social psychologist Tim Wilson argues that a better way of changing behavior may be ”to try to get inside [people’s] heads and understand how they see the world—the stories and narratives they tell themselves” according to this article in the American Psychological Association ”Monitor on Psychology”, March 2012, volume 43, number 3, p. 28.

11. Self-Determination Theory: Tips to Keeping New Year’s Resolutions

According to Ed Deci ”the best way to keep on track with your goals for the new year is to think hard about why you’re pursuing them”.

12. The Happy Secret to Better Work

From the website: ”We believe that we should work to be happy, but could that be backwards? In this fast-moving and entertaining talk from TEDxBloomington, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that actually happiness inspires productivity.” (Runs 12 minutes, 21 seconds)

13. Royalty-free Images From the United States Government

Librarians at SUNY Albany put together this list of links to collections of images from the United States Government which may be free to use. They include Federal photo collection, NASA and NOAA images, National Park Service photos and much more (opens in PDF format).

14. Reflections on Carl Rogers

According to the website: ”Digging into the history of psychological science, the Observer has retrieved classic interviews with prominent psychological scientists for an ongoing series Psychology (Yesterday and) Today. Each interview is introduced by a contemporary psychological scientist, and the full text of the interview is available on the Observer website. We invite you to reflect on the words of these legendary scientists, and decide whether their voices still resonate with the science of today.”

15. Exuberance for Novelty Has Benefits

”Novelty-seeking is one of the traits that keeps you healthy and happy and fosters personality growth as you age,” says psychiatrist C. Robert Cloninger, ”It can lead to antisocial behavior … but if you combine this adventurousness and curiosity with persistence … then you get the kind of creativity that benefits society as a whole.”  Read more about novelty-seeking in this article by John Tierney in ”The New York Times”, February 13, 2012.

16. The Strange Tale of Phineas Gage

Joanna Schaffhausen describes the fascinating case of Phineas Gage who had a change in personality as a result of a traumatic brain injury.

17. Eight Ways That Money Can Buy Happiness

Eric Barker summarizes the thinking of Daniel Gilbert on what does and does not make us happy in this list of ways that money, contrary to a popular adage, really can buy us happiness, if spent the right way.

18. Want to Be Happier Right Now? The Think Positive! Experiment

Reflecting on the 3 best events over the course of a week, as opposed to the three worst, colors our overall judgement of how the week was.

19. ”I Love Me!”: A Q&A About Narcissism

Psychotherapist Samuel López De Victoria presents this overview of Narcissism to answer people’s most often asked questions. From ”Psych Central” blog, April 18, 2012.

20. Favorite Link Revisited:

Jonathan Mueller at North Central College, in Naperville, Illinois, put together the extensive website (and newsletter!) Resources for Teaching Social Psychology. Check out his resources for teaching the Self as well as other topics related to both personality psychology and social psychology.