Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 4, December 2015

December 17, 2015

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Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,256  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Just a quick update with some links for this month. We know that some of you are finishing up a semester while others are planning the semester ahead, while others are just carrying on in the New Year!

To all of you, we wish you a peaceful holiday season and all the best in 2016!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Just two questions predict how well a pilot will handle an emergency
“A new study reports that, more than relevant facts such as age and years of experience, pilots’ answers to two simple questions can more accurately forecast how they will respond to a stressful situation.” These questions help to determine whether the pilot views the situation as a challenge or as a threat. Published in “Anxiety, Stress, & Coping” and summarized here for BPS Research Digest, July 7, 2015.

3. Your personality can invite loneliness, and loneliness can shape your personality
According to new research, “it appears our personality affects the likelihood that we’ll become more lonely (and feel less well) as we get older, but also that being lonely (and feeling less healthy) shapes our personality, potentially setting up a vicious circle of isolation”. Published in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for BPS Research Digest, July 21, 2015.

4. Is Your Brain Male or Female?
Writer Veronica Pamoukaghlian reviews neuroscience investigating possible gender differences in brain form and function. Posted June 6, 2015.

5. Why You Should Be True to Yourself
New research by Maryam Kouchaki and her colleagues finds that feeling inauthentic is related to what it means to be a moral person. Published in Psychological Science and summarized here for PsyBlog, June 11, 2015.

6. How To Be Content When Your Life Feels Out of Control
According to new research “In the survey of over 500 people, the researchers found that both primary and secondary control were linked to positive emotions. Only primary control, though, was linked to negative emotions.” Published in “Social Psychological and Personality Science” and summarized here for PsyBlog,June 8, 2015.

7. This personality trait may get you hired — but it won’t necessarily get you promoted
While agreeable people are well-liked by their colleagues and being cooperative, flexible, tolerant, and forgiving can help you land a job, this trait may not help one advance their career. From “Business Insider”, June 4, 2015.

8. Favorite Link Revisited: Chimpanzees’ Personas Seem More Complex Than People’s
Using the same techniques as the early (human) trait theorists did, Hani Freeman and her colleagues found evidence that chimpanzee personality consists of 6 dimensions. These include extroversion, agreeableness and openness, shared by humans, but also reactivity (related to the human trait of neuroticism, perhaps?), dominance and methodicalness which are not. Their research was published in the American Journal of Primatology and summarized here in The Economist, June 15, 2013.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 2, October 2015

October 29, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,240  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, we bring you some fascinating links from many areas of personality, including how there may be an unintended side effect of deep brain stimulation (used to treat Parkinson’s and other diseases): personality change. Also, the “Science of Relationships” website has a fascinating psychoanalysis of sorts of Elsa and Anna, the sisters from the movie “Frozen”, suggesting that their rocky relationship may have been due to differing attachment styles. Finally, Dan Ariely, who’s psychoeconomic research always makes us think, presents a short video on how to encourage motivation at work. And at this point in the semester, who couldn’t use a little more motivation? If you’re in need of a smile, then check out the monkey selfies found under our Favorite Link Revisited.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Anxious-Avoidant Duos: Walking on Thin Ice in Relationships and Physical Health

Writing for “Science of Relationships”, Jena Lempke describes how Disney’s hit movie “Frozen” depicts how varying preferences for closeness in people with different attachments styles can lead to relationship problems. She describes how the friction between the sisters Elsa (with her avoidant attachment style) and Anna (with her anxious attachment style) was caused by their different attachment styles.

3. Personality Changes After Deep Brain Stimulation

“Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a well-known and accepted treatment for neurological and psychiatric diseases. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), DBS clearly improves patients’ symptoms, functionality and quality of life in the long run. Nevertheless, it seems that the electrodes do not have motor-specific functions. DBS influences mental states and personality and in some cases it can even lead to a “new personality”” by increasing impulsivity. From “Brain Blogger”, October 29, 2015.

4. What Pushes Us To Work Hard — Even When We Don’t Have To?

“Behavioral economist Dan Ariely says we work hard not because we have to, but because we want to. He examines the intrinsic values we need to feel motivated to work” in this TED talk from NPR, October 2, 2015. (runs 14 minutes and 52 seconds)

5. Erich Fromm on the Art of Loving and What Is Keeping Us from Its Mastery

“There is hardly any activity, any enterprise, which is started with such tremendous hopes and expectations, and yet, which fails so regularly, as love.” Read about Erich Fromm’s book “The Art of Loving” in this essay by Maria Popova for “BrainPickings”, October 29, 2015.

6. This Personality Trait Predicts Your Tendency to Lie and Cheat

“Researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau in Germany say that a sixth personality trait,” called honesty-humility, “can predict one type of behavior that none” of the usual five-factors can: dishonesty. From “Business Insider”, June 15, 2015.

7. Tested: Whether You Can Change Your Personality At Will

According to research by Hudson and Fraley (2015) and published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”, “people may be able to change their self-reported personality traits through volitional means, and represent a first step toward understanding the processes that enable people to do so.” This summary from “PsyBlog”, June 16, 2015.

8. What the Textbooks Don’t Tell You About Psychology’s Most Famous Case Study

“If you turn to many of the leading introductory psychology textbooks (American ones, at least), you’ll find the wrong answer, or a misleading account. Richard Griggs, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Florida, has just analysed the content of 23 contemporary textbooks (either released or updated within the last couple of years), and he finds most of them contain distortions, omissions and inaccuracies” when it comes to describing the life of Phineas Gage. British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, June 30, 2015.

9. What Holocaust Survivors Can Teach Us About Gratitude

Neuroscientists have gained new insights into how gratitude operates in the brain. Glenn Fox and his colleagues had participants read testimonies of Holocaust survivors while their brains were being scanned. They discovered that areas activated during moments of gratitude include processing reward, fairness, moral cognition, and self-reference. Published in the journal “Frontiers in Psychology”, and summarized here for “PsyBlog”, October 21, 2015.

10. Should We Genetically Screen Four-Year-Olds?

Would true equality in education mean testing children’s genetics at the age of four, so that any learning difficulties revealed can be accommodated right from the start of primary education? Hear Robert Plomin on the role genetics play in children’s success. From “The Guardian”, July 17, 2015. (audio interview; runs 42 minutes and 46 seconds).

11. Only When I Laugh: The Science of Laughter

Laughter overrides our usual vocal and physical control to make sounds we never normally hear in any other context. Read all about this intriguing response in “The Guardian”, July 6, 2015.

12. Favorite Link Revisited: Monkey Selfie

Monkey Hijacks Photographer’s Camera and Shots Self-Portraits While filming macaque monkeys in an Indonesian national park, photographer David Slater lost his camera to one of his subjects. The resulting self-portraits are both comical and all too human and illustrate nicely the question of self-recognition as a uniquely human capacity.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 11, July 2015

July 22, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,179 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you no doubt have heard of this summer’s hit movie “Inside Out”. This charming movie depicts life inside the head of 11-year old Riley focusing on her emotions personified by different characters and grounded in psychological theory and research.

Turns out, social-personality psychologist and emotion researcher Dacher Keltner is long time friends with Pixar director Pete Docter. The two became intrigued by the mysterious ways of emotions in their own kids (according to link #3 below). Keltner explains that pre-teens often experience a drop in happiness and a rise in anxiety. “It’s like the world crashes down on them,” Keltner said. The movie traces that shift, with tear-inducing as well as laugh-inducing effects.

Keltner was joined by facial expressions expert psychologist Paul Ekman in working with the Pixar team to portray childhood emotions, memory and character development in a scientifically sound way. The result speaks for itself. We here at Personality Pedagogy urge you to take you and your little friends to see this family-friendly movie, if you haven’t already done so.

Also new this month, it was announced that work has begun on a new film depicting Viktor Frankl’s account of his experience during the Holocaust. Frankl’s book “Man’s Search for Meaning” is being adapted by screenwriter Adam Gibgot. Gibgot explains, “The movie is about the best and worst of humanity, but how out of the worst the best can emerge.”

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Science of Sadness And Joy: ‘Inside Out’ Gets Childhood Emotions Right
The hit of the summer of 2015, “Inside Out”, depicts life for an 11-year old girl. Much of the film takes place inside her mind, in a control center staffed by five emotions personified: Joy, Sadness, Fear, and Disgust. Read about the science behind the movie and the contributions of psychologists Dacher Keltner and Paul Ekman who were consultants to the film.

3. ’Inside Out’ Movie Reflects the Realities and Fantasies of Neuroscience
Kids and the general public may be learning about how the brain and emotions work from an unlikely source: the hit movie “Inside Out” (2015). This article takes a look at the science behind the movie.

4. The Harry Potter Personality Test
According to a study published in the journal “Personality and Individual Differences” a person’s preferred Hogwart’s house from the fictional Harry Potter series may be related to their personality traits.

5. What it Means to Come Out in the Transgender Community
Inspired by the recent debut of Caitlyn Jenner on the June 2015 cover of “Vanity Fair” magazine, “Time” ran this article explaining that the process of coming out as a transgendered person is not linear; it varies from person to person. From “Time”, June 2, 2015.

6. Epigenetics and Its Major Influence on Life
In this essay James D. Baird explains how the science of epigenetics is finding that genes aren’t our destiny despite popular thinking. “Brain Blogger”, June 11, 2015.

7. Group Memberships Boost Self-Esteem More Than Friends Alone
“Belonging to multiple groups that are important to you boosts self-esteem much more than having friends alone” according to research published in PLOS ONE and summarized here for “ScienceDaily”, June, 2015.

8. Abraham Maslow: Father of Modern Management
Presents an overview of Maslow’s theories including the hierarchy of needs, self-actualization, theory Z, peak experiences; a summary of his books; quotes; and other resources.

9. Muppet Wiki: Walter Mischel
Muppet Wiki is a collaborative encyclopedia for everything related to Jim Henson, Sesame Street, The Muppet Show, and The Muppets Studio. It includes this page on Walter Mischel and features the musical sketch “Good Things Come to Those Who Wait” illustrating the concept of delay of gratification.

10. Awaken: Fritz Perls
Presents an overview of Perls’ life and theory including links to articles and videos.

11. Fritz Perls Treats People With Demons
The video includes Fritz Perls treating a man with a psychosis and a women with grief from parent issues. (Runs 31 minutes, 29 seconds).

12. Fritz Perls: Spiritual Training
Fritz Perls speaks about how to use your spiritual energy. (Runs 1 minute 18 seconds.)

13. Fritz Perls Gestalt Segment
Fritz Perls recites the Gestalt prayer. (Runs 8 minutes 16 seconds.)

14. Fritz Perls on Gestalt Therapy
Fritz Perls speaks to students about Gestalt therapy, the self and spirit. (Runs 6 minutes 49 seconds.)

15. Fritz Perls Workshop
Excerpt from a Fritz Perls workshop. (Runs 1 minute 37 seconds.)

16. Frederick Perls: A Son’s Reflections
From the webpage: “In celebration of the centennial of the birth of Frederick Perls, The Gestalt Journal invited his son Stephen, to address our Fifteenth Annual Conference on the Theory and Practice of Gestalt Therapy. Dr. Perls delivered this talk on the morning of April 23, 1993, at the Hotel du Parc in Montreal.”

17. The Gestalt Therapy Network
Includes digital forums for practitioners, students, and interested others; a directory of practitioners; and a comprehensive bibliography.

18. Night Owl or Morning Lark?
Should you pull an all-nighter or wake up early to study? This blog post reviews the evidence and concludes that it all depends on your chronotype.

19. The Perils of Novelty Seeking
World-class endurance athlete, coach, author, and political activist Christopher Bergland reviews the concept of Novelty Seeking, how it relates to the Big Five, and how sometimes the need for novelty may lead to extreme sports, ultra-endurance, and ultimately life-threatening experiences.

20. Desperately Seeking Sensation: Fear, Reward, and the Human Need for Novelty
“Sensation-seeking, the tendency to seek out novel experiences, is a general personality trait that has been extensively studied in psychological research, but neuroscience is just beginning to take aim at it.”

21. Novelty and the Brain: Why New Things Make Us Feel So Good
“We all like shiny new things, whether it’s a new gadget, new city, or new job. In fact, our brains are made to be attracted to novelty—and it turns out that it could actually improve our memory and learning capacity. The team at social sharing app Buffer explains how.” From LifeHacker, May 21, 2013.

22. Better Get to Work: Procrastination May Harm Heart Health
New evidence suggests that chronic procrastinators may be more vulnerable to serious health conditions like cardiovascular disease and hypertension. From the Association for Psychological Science, May 5, 2015.

23. Attachment Training
Alan Sroufe and June Sroufe provide information about attachment in the John Bowlby-Mary Ainsworth tradition and training in the assessment of attachment across the lifespan along with a primer on attachment theory, a list of suggested basic readings, and more.

24. An Attachment Primer: Fundamentals of Attachment Theory
Presents a brief overview of attachment theory.

25. Favorite Link Revisited: The British Museum of Science on Emotions
The British National Museum of Science has an extensive interactive web site. This online exhibit on recognizing emotions, emotions and the brain, faking emotional expression, animal emotions, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 8, April 2015

April 30, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,139 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Though the semester is winding down around here, this newsletter brings you some of the latest links for teaching personality and keeping up with research findings in the field of personality. From Viktor Frankl to Neuroscience at the movies, from how much money MBTI types make to testing and attachment, there is sure to be something to inspire you below. Even if you are drowning in grading!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Neuro Psi Fi: The Brain Science Behind the Movies

Neuropsychologist Mary V. Spiers of Drexel University created and maintains this web page dedicated to show the brain science behind brain disorders and special abilities such as amnesia, autism, Tourette’s Syndrome, and others as illustrated in popular films. The page includes neuropsychological movie reviews in which the accuracy of the information portrayed in the film is evaluated in light of current research, and also brain resources, a blog, teaching resources, and more.

3. How We Elevate Each Other: Viktor Frankl on the Human Spirit and Why Idealism Is the Best Realism

In an excerpt from a 1972 lecture at the University of Toronto, Viktor Frankl “brimming with his humble wisdom and disarming wit… makes a beautiful case for believing in each other and viewing the human spirit with hope rather than cynicism.” Runs 4 minutes, 21 seconds.

4. The Weirdest Way People Communicate Their Happiness

Why is happiness so infectious? A new study published in the journal “Psychological Science” finds that people communicate their happiness to others through perspiration. Read about the study here in “PsyBlog”, April 17, 2015.

5. The Feeling That Expands Time and Increases Well-Being

Awe “that jaw-dropping moment when coming across something surprising, powerful, beautiful or even sublime can have a transformative effect” according to new research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here in “PsyBlog”, April 16, 2015.

6. 7 Science-Backed Signs You Work for a Narcissist

Research suggests that you are more likely to find a narcissist in the corner office than just about anywhere else. Find out why in this article from the “Business Insider”, April 27, 2015.

7. Is 10% of the Population Really Gay?

“Drawing on the widest survey of sexual behaviour since the Kinsey Report, David Spiegelhalter, in his book “Sex By Numbers”, answers key questions about our private lives. Here he reveals how Kinsey’s contested claim that 10% of us are gay is actually close to the mark”. From “The Guardian”, April 5, 2015.

8. The Personality Types That Make the Most Money

According to Truity Psychometrics, your Myers-Briggs personality type correlates with how much money you earn. Check out their graphic in “Business Insider”, April 20, 2015.

9. The Weird Psychological Reason Why Big Bonuses Can Demotivate Workers

“Given a choice between solving puzzles for free or for pay — which would you pick?” Based on Self-Determination Theory the answer may surprise you. Read about Autonomy and Competence here along with a third factor, Purpose, added by Daniel Pink. From “Business Insider”, April 7, 2015. You can hear Daniel Pink’s TED talk on the difference between incentivizing and intrinsic motivation here too (runs 18 minutes, 36 seconds).

10. Morning People (“Larks”) Are More Punctual Than “Owls”

Larks arrived more punctually than Owls to their morning lectures according to research published in “Current Psychology” and summarized here for The British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, March 16, 2015.

11. 3 More Reasons You Can’t Win With a Narcissist

A narcissist, a “profoundly selfish person who lacks empathy, makes you feel small and robs you of the happiness you deserve” can be difficult to deal with for these and other reasons. From “PsychCentral”, April 19, 2015.

12. People Are Overly Optimistic About the Benefits of Optimism

“This work doesn’t suggest that optimism is ineffective as a broad strategy for approaching life, or at helping us fulfill objectives at a broad scale. But it does suggest that we put more on the shoulders of optimism that it can bear” according to research published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” and summarized here for the British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, April 29, 2015.

13. Extraversion May Be Less Common Than We Think

New research suggests that Extrovert are over-represented in our social networks, which may overestimate the prevalence of extroversion in the population. This, according to research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here for “Science Daily”, April 6, 2015.

14. I (Don’t) Want 2 B w/ U: Texting, Sexting, and Avoidant Attachment

“Those who are high in avoidance tend to be uncomfortable with intimacy, want less closeness in their relationships, and distrust others more. And when it comes to electronic communication with partners, it turns out that avoidance also is related texting and sexting behaviors, but in different ways.” This, according to the Benjamin Le writing for “The Science of Relationships”, April 13, 2015.

15. Writing Exercises Scientifically Proven to Redirect Your Life

Inspired by the research of Timothy Wilson and others, writing exercises, like distancing yourself from negative experiences or determining what your best possible self looks like, may be beneficial according to Jane Porter writing for “Fast Company”, February 11, 2015.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: A Guide to Writing Learning Objectives for Teachers of Psychology (2012)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to announce this new resource for teachers by Guy A. Boysen of the State University of New York at Fredonia and McKendree University. The purpose of this 18-page resource is to assist psychology teachers in (a) understanding key terms related to objectives and their assessment, (b) writing behavior-based learning objectives, and (c) evaluating objectives once they are written. The resource includes a table that illustrates how various psychology outcomes can be addressed with objectives at various levels of Bloom’s taxonomy.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 4, December 2014

December 18, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,098 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

If you are looking for signs of the season, look no further than this issue. Below, we are pleased to present to you links to research on children’s emotions while waiting for Santa and a special name-that-psychologist version of Michael Britt’s holiday classic “The Psych Elves”. Of course, we also have more academic links like theories of emotion, brain imaging and risk-taking, chronotypes, and the possible benefit of mixed emotions like nervous laughter and tears of joy.

We wish you and your students a very happy holiday season!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Comparing the 5 Theories of Emotion

Psychiatrist Beppe Micallef-Trigona briefly reviews the James-Lange theory, the Canon-Bard theory, the Schachter two-factor theory, the Cognitive-Mediational theory of Lazarus, and the facial feedback theory in this article for “Brain Blogger”. Posted October, 2014.

3. Can Brain Imaging Detect Risk Takers?

Apparently so, according to new research summarized here. Research by DeWitt et al. published in “Psychiatry Research” and by Helfinstein et al. published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America” found correlations between brain structures and risk-taking. From “Brain Blogger” October 2014.

4. You’ve heard of “Owls” and “Larks”, now sleep scientists propose two more chronotypes

Research by Arcady Putilov and his colleagues finds evidence for a “high energetic” group who feel high energy in both the morning and in the evening, and a “lethargic” group who feel sleepy in both the morning and in the evening. From the “British Psychological Society Research Digest”, November 5, 2014.

5. Personality Disorders in the Media

The “Psychology in Action” website presents this look at famous characters who may fit the criteria of a personality disorder. Summarizes the criteria and the evidence for schizoid,  schizotypal, antisocial, borderline, histrionic, narcissistic, and dependent personality disorders. Posted October, 2013.

6. How Good Are You At Reading People?

How good at you at identifying the basic emotional expressions in the eyes and face? Here is a fun quiz based on the research by Paul Ekman and others on facial expression of the basic emotions.

7. Scary Santa Scholarship

Summarizes the work of John Trinkaus, called the Scary Santa Studies, on the facial expressions of children waiting to see Santa at a department store. The emotion most often shown across the four studies? Indifference.

8. How To Become A Morning Person

The “Business Insider” published this info graphic summarizing the research on chronotypes, including helpful information on how to shift your body clock to be more of a morning person. Published December 16, 2014.

9. Nervous Laughter, Tears of Joy

These incongruous — and other often inappropriate and embarrassing emotional expressions — may actually help us to regulate our emotions. “That is, when we are at risk of being overwhelmed by our emotions — either positive or negative — expressing the opposite emotion can have a dampening effect and restore emotional balance” according to psychologist Wray Herbert writing for “The Huffington Post”, November, 2014.

10. The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

The ability to monitor one’s own and other people’s emotions, while generally an important social skill, may also have a dark side. According to a study recently published in the “Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology”, “Young women with higher emotional intelligence are more likely to commit acts of delinquency”. From “The Huffington Post”, November, 2014.

11. Acing the Marshmallow Test

Lea Winerman, writing for the APA “Monitor on Psychology,” presents this interview with Walter Mischel on his research on delay of gratification and the marshmallow test.

12. Did B. F. Skinner Raise His Children in a Skinner Box?

Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast created this animation of Skinner talking — using Skinner’s actual voice and responses — to answer this long held belief in unique and entertaining way (Runs 3 minutes, 59 seconds). Posted October, 2014.

13. Psychology’s Most Famous Elves

Michael Britt, of “The Psych Files” podcast, did it again. He turned these 8 famous psychologists — among them Sigmund Freud and Anna Freud — into Elves with a special guest appearance by Melanie Klein. Can you identify who they all are? (runs 2 minutes 1 second). Posted December, 2014.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: The Psych Elves

Michael Britt, of “The Psych Files” podcast, had the temerity to turn these three personality psychologists into Elves. Can you identify them? (Runs 51 seconds).


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 9, May 2014

May 31, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,996 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are mourning the loss of Sandra Bem, feminist scholar and psychologist who died on May 20 just short of her 70th birthday. She will be remembered for her theoretical work and research on gender schema theory, the social construction of gender and sexuality, and her unconventional views on gender and child rearing.

Like many of our readers this month, we welcome the unofficial start of summer and the end of a semester (and school year!). We hope the summer is a time of rest and rejuvenation and we’ll be doing our best to keep the inspiration coming as you look ahead to teaching personality in a future semester.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Love Makes You Strong: Romantic Relationships Help Neurotic People Stabilize Their Personality

Romantic relationships can help young adults who are high in Neuroticism to become less anxious, insecure, and easily annoyed according to research by Christine Finn and colleagues in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for “Science Daily” May 9, 2014.

3. Rice Theory Explains North-South China Cultural Differences

From the page: “A new cultural psychology study has found that psychological differences between the people of northern and southern China mirror the differences between community-oriented East Asia and the more individualistic Western world — and the differences seem to have come about because southern China has grown rice for thousands of years, whereas the north has grown wheat.” From “Science Daily”, May 8, 2014.

4. Does Facebook Affect Our Self-Esteem, Sense of Belonging?

From the page: “With 1.11 billion users per month on average, Facebook has become a global phenomenon offering continual and direct communication with friends and family. Research into how social media websites define us socially, and the influence that social media has on our personal welfare, suggests that a lack of social participation on Facebook leads to people feeling less meaningful.” From “Science Daily”, May 8, 2014.

5. Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient

Sam Kean for “Slate” magazine provides this retelling of the Gage tale, this time with the debunking of some myths and with additional information demonstrating that “The true story of Phineas Gage is much more fascinating that the mythical textbook accounts”. Includes new computer models of Gage’s injury and how it may have affected his brain functioning.

6. I Want You To Know That I’m Tyrion Lannister

The Forer (Barnum) Effect has found a new home: The Internet Quiz. Writer Maria Konnikova suggests that the reason why we are so drawn to these obviously false personality quizzes may have to do with our fascination with the self and our fundamental need to belong. From “The New Yorker”, May 1, 2014.

7. This is the Personality Trait That Most Often Predicts Success

Writing for “Inc.” magazine, Drake Baer describes the research which demonstrates that being high in Conscientiousness will help you succeed in many domains of life across the life span. From May, 2014.

8. Teaching Sexual Orientation

Psychologist David G. Myers suggests ways of teaching controversial topics like sexual orientation by focusing on evidence-based conclusions and how psychologists might test whether social policies affect the health and well-being of gay people. From the APS “Observer”, 27(5), May/June, 2014.

9. Epigenetics 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Explaining Everything

Genetics researcher Cath Ennis wrote this primer for The Guardian newspaper explaining what epigenetics is and how it can help us understand human health and disease. Posted April 25, 2014.

10. Do we Get Nicer With Age?

Amy Kluber, for Newsy, reports on a study by Christopher Soto and colleagues which found that people who were happier at the start of the study become more emotionally stable, conscientious, agreeable and introverted as they matured over the course of the study demonstrating that personality changes with life events. Posted April 22, 2014. Runs 1 minute 34 seconds.

11. Cultivating Happiness Often Misunderstood

From the page: “The concept of maximizing happiness has been explored by researchers, who have found that pursuing concrete ‘giving’ goals rather than abstract ones leads to greater satisfaction. One path to happiness is through concrete, specific goals of benevolence — like making someone smile or increasing recycling — instead of following similar but more abstract goals — like making someone happy or saving the environment.” From “Science Daily”, April 15, 2014.

12. Outgoing Behavior Makes for Happier Humans: Across Cultures, Extroverts Have More Fun

From the page: “Happy is as happy does, apparently — for human beings all over the world. Not only does acting extroverted lead to more positive feelings across several cultures, but people also report more upbeat behavior when they feel free to be themselves.” From “Science Daily”, April 15, 2014.

13. Biological Evidence of Positive and Negative People in the World

From the page: “The ability to stay positive when times get tough — and, conversely, of being negative — may be hardwired in the brain, finds new research.” From “Science Daily”, April 2, 2014.

14. Computer Maps 21 Distinct Emotional Expressions — Even “Happily Disgusted”

From the page: “Researchers have found a way for computers to recognize 21 distinct facial expressions — even expressions for complex or seemingly contradictory emotions such as “happily disgusted” or “sadly angry.” The study more than triples the number of documented facial expressions that researchers can now use for cognitive analysis.” From “Science Daily”, March 31, 2014.

15. Favorite Link Revisited: The Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI)

According to the site: “The Bem Sex Role Inventory was developed in 1971 by Dr. Sandra Lipsitz Bem. It characterizes your personality as masculine, feminine, androgynous, or undifferentiated. The BSRI is based on gender stereotypes, so what it’s actually measuring is how well you fit into your traditional sex role. Thus, your score may say as much about how our cultural expectations have changed over the last 35 years as it does about your personality.” You can take the original 60-item scale and receive your scores automatically online here.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 6, February 2014

February 27, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,948 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, the genes have it! Read below to hear about some interesting cross-cultural work about a genotype-environment correlation that leads to greater cultural value-learning among both European-Americans and Asians, social experience affecting our genetic functioning, and the genetic predisposition to focus on the negative. Don’t fret, in our “Favorite Link Revisited” feature, we provide you with background information to help your students understand the latest research findings in this fascinating area.

Also, we’ve done some housekeeping this month and have caught up on our backlog of older links we are only just getting around to updating. Please excuse the “mess” of slightly older links below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. The Remarkable Human Self

According to Roy Baumeister in his Award Address delivered at the 25th APS Annual Convention in Washington, DC, “the self is not part of the human anatomy, but rather a powerful interface between our animal bodies and the complex cultural systems in which we live. Without the concept of self … scientific analysis of social and economic processes would be all but impossible.” You can read a summary of his talk or watch a video of the entire talk (48 minutes and 24 seconds) here. Posted January 2014.

3. Young And In Love? Thank Mom and Dad, At Least A Little

“Teenagers’ relationships with their parents have a small but measurable impact on their romantic relationships up to 15 years later, according to researchers at the University of Alberta” according to research published in the “Journal of Marriage and Family” and summarized here for NPR, February 2014.

4. Facebook Now Offers Over 50 Genders to Choose From in Your Profile

Facebook now lets users self-identity using a multitude of terms to customize their gender beyond “male” and “female”.

5. The Powerlessness of Positive Thinking

Writer Adam Alter describes the paradoxical finding that positive fantasies may actually lessen our chance of succeeding — if they prevent us from taking concrete steps to realize our goals. From “The New Yorker”, February 19, 2014.

6. Mapping Mindsets: The World of Cultural Neuroscience

Summarizes research suggesting that cultural differences in emotional expression may be linked to neuroplasticity, genetics, and a genotype-environment interaction. From the “APS Observer”, December 2013.

7. Social Experiences Affect Our Genes and Health

“Scientists are uncovering increasing evidence that changes in the expression of hundreds of genes can occur as a result of the social environments we inhabit. As a result of these dynamics, experiences we have today can affect our health for days and even months into the future” according to research by George Slavich and Steven Cole at the University of California, Los Angeles, and summarized here in the “APS Observer”, May/June 2013.

8. Psychology 411

“Psychology Degree 411 is a comprehensive resource for prospective students interested in pursuing a degree in psychology or becoming a psychologist. Explore popular psychology degree options, find schools with psychology programs, and learn about some of the top careers in psychology.”  Includes information on degrees in psychology, schools, licensure to become a psychologist, scholarships, careers, interviews with professionals, jobs and more.

9. The Grad Cafe Forum

This website provides a platform for people who are applying to or in graduate programs — psychology included — to post questions, suggest strategy, and share information about specific graduate programs.

10. The Genetic Predisposition to Focus on the Negative

Research by Rebecca Todd and colleagues suggests that people with the ADRA2b gene are more likely to take not of negative emotional events than people without the gene. The was no difference in the processing of positive emotion words by people with and without the gene. From “PsyBlog”, October 2013.

11. 19 Reasons Why Willpower Fails You, And What To Do About It

David DiSalvo, writing for “Psychology Today”, describe 19 science-based reason “why will and will alone isn’t enough” and what we can do about it.

12. What Every Parent Needs to Know About Praise

How to shift your dialogue from judging to loving by Laura Markham for “Psychology Today”, July 31, 2013.

13. Criticizing (Common Criticisms of) Praise

Psychology Alfie Kohn weighs in on the issue in this blog from “Psychology Today”, February 2012.

14. Why It’s a Bad Idea to Praise Children

Raul Raeburn weighs in a response to the Kohn article (above).

15. 6 Secrets You Can Learn From The Happiest People On Earth

Eric Barker takes a look back at what we can learn from the happiest people to make our own lives better in this post from his “Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog, December 2013.

16. Are Extroverts Really Happier?

Arnie Kozak redefines what happiness is for extroverts and introverts for “Psychology Today”, November 2013.

17. Are Extroverts Happier Than Introverts? Yes, But . . .

Susan Cain reflects on different meanings of happiness. While extroverts may define happiness as something more like exuberance, introverts may define happiness on other ways including flow, gratitude, solitude, melancholy, and meaning. From “Psychology Today”, December 2011.

18. Favorite Link Revisited: Learn Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website to disseminate educational materials on genetics, bioscience, and health. Includes animations to teach the basics of DNA, genes, heredity and traits, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 5, January 2014

January 27, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,930 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy New Year! And for many of you, Happy New Semester! We have quite the newsy newsletter this month, starting with a strange and disturbing crime: vandals attempted to steal the ancient Greek urn containing the ashes of Sigmund Freud and his wife Martha Bernays. The vase was damaged in the process and is now kept in a more secure location.

Also, 2013 ended with an exciting and controversial new finding suggesting that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. But before you let the news go to your head (so to speak) check out the astute critique of the research and interpretation of the evidence by cognitive psychologist Christian Jarrett.

Finally, you may have noticed that we’ve spruced the place up a bit. We are in the process of adding photos and changing the page layout to make the site more readable.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Urn Containing Sigmund Freud’s Ashes Smashed During Theft Attempt

“Staff at the crematorium in Golders Green discovered broken pieces of the urn, which dates from around 300BC and came from Freud’s collection of antiquities, lying on the floor on New Year’s Day, after thieves apparently broke in overnight and smashed it in the attempt to steal it.” The severely damaged urn was subsequently moved to a secure location according to staff at the crematorium. From “The Guardian”, January 15, 2014.

3. Male and Female Brains Wired Differently, Scans Reveal

According to research by Madhura Ingalhalikar and colleagues and summarized here “Scientists have drawn on nearly 1,000 brain scans to confirm what many had surely concluded long ago: that stark differences exist in the wiring of male and female brains.” Evidence suggests that men’s brains have more connectivity within each hemisphere; women have more connectivity between the hemispheres. From “The Guardian”, December 2, 2013.

4. Getting in a Tangle Over Men’s and Women’s Brain Wiring

Christian Jarrett for “Brain Watch” takes a critical view of the research and the interpretation of the evidence suggesting that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. Posted December 4, 2013.

5. Is Narcissism Essential for Success?

The Association for Psychological Science reports the results of a study which suggests that “While narcissists are more likely to garner leadership positions, there was no evidence of a link between narcissism and a leader’s success . . . the poorest leaders are those with either extremely high or extremely low levels of narcissism.” January 17, 2014.

6. B. F. Skinner at the APA Annual Convention 1990

“Behavioral psychologist Dr. B. F. Skinner presented this keynote address at the American Psychological Association’s 1990 Annual Convention. In Dr. Skinner’s last public appearance, he expresses his belief that the proper role for psychological science is the analysis of behavior. He speaks about the path psychology has followed over the years, from early introspection methods to three kinds of variation and selection, including natural selection, the evolution of operant conditioning, and the evolution of culture.” August 10, 1990. (in English with Spanish subtitles). Runs 20 minutes, 56 seconds.

7. Nicholas Claus: Big Five for the Big Guy

Heather A. Haas wrote this humorous “case study” of Santa Claus using the big five. Find out whether the big guy is high or low on Extraversion Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism and Openness and the “evidence” she used to make her judgements in “Dialogue”, the newsletter of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, volume 19 (1), Spring 2004, p. 24-25, 21.

8. Parents Sinking Some Kids With Their Puffed-up Praise, Study Finds

Research by Eddie Brummelman and colleagues suggests that “Moms and dads who bathe kids in exaggerated flattery to boost low self-esteem are stifling the very children they hope to elevate, a new study shows.” From “NBC News”, January 3, 2014.

9. Should Every Kid Get a Trophy Just for Participating?

SportzEdge.com presents this discussion by their commentators on whether children ought to get a trophy just for participating. Presents some interesting ideas to get your students thinking. Runs 7 minutes, 11 seconds.

10. Editing Your Life’s Stories Can Create Happier Endings

This piece from the NPR program “All Things Considered” uses the example of the author Lulu Miller’s nephew to illustrate the work of psychologist Tim Wilson. “Wilson has been studying how small changes in a person’s own stories and memories can help with emotional health. He calls the process “story editing” And he says small tweaks in the interpretation of life events can reap huge benefits.” From January 1, 2014. Includes a link to listen to the story, which runs 8 minutes, 54 second.

11. The Meaningful Life is a Road Worth Traveling

“A Stanford research project explored the key differences between lives of happiness and meaningfulness. While the two are similar, dramatic differences exist – and one should not underestimate the power of meaningfulness. “The quest for meaning is a key part of what makes us human,” ” Jennifer Aaker and her colleagues concluded. From the “Stanford News”, January 1, 2014.

12. A Case Study Using CBT

The Australian Institute of Professional Counselors presents this excerpt from a counseling session of an actual client to illustrate the four basic steps of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: identify the automatic thought, question the validity of the automatic thought, and challenge core beliefs. Posted March 22, 2010.

13. CBT in Action: A Case Study

Dr. Nicholas Jenner, a counseling psychologist, illustrates how the use of Daily Mood Sheets can help clients see the the feelings and emotions caused by a triggering event. He presents this case study of “Jodie” and how she was able to recognize her problematic thought patterns and where they came from through therapy.

14. Psychologists Put the ‘Selfie’ On the Couch

Psychologists Lisa Obran and Andrew Przybylski explore both the positive (e.g., “self exploration and identity experimentation” in the service of relatedness needs and identity formation) and the negative (e.g.,”indulg[ing] in a narcissistic activity”) sides of selfies in this video for the #BBCtrending program. (runs 1 minute, 29 seconds).

15. Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over

“When a team of scientists in Finland asked people to map out where they felt different emotions on their bodies, they found that the results were surprisingly consistent, even across cultures.” From NPR Health News, December 30, 2013.

16. The Orchid Effect: How Relationships and Genetics Influence Your Health

Research by S. C. Suth and R. F. Krueger, published in “Psychological Science” found evidence for a genotype-environment interaction or “an orchid effect” in which “really bad marriages are capable of turning on (and even amplifying) any genetic predispositions one might have to experiencing poor health. But really good marriages may help “good health” genes thrive more so than they would have otherwise.” From the “Science of Relationships” blog, December 2, 2013.

17. Fearful ‘Memories’ Passed Between Generations Through Genetic Code

Jeremy Dean of PsyBlog summarizes a study by Dias and Ressler (2013) which found evidence that mice who were conditioned to become afraid of a particular smell passed that fear onto their offspring. Could this transgenerational genetic response happen in humans? That’s the big question. Published December 5, 2013.

18. Missing “Brake in the Brain” Can Trigger Anxiety

According to research published in the journal “Cerebral Cortex” and summarized here “social phobias and fear can be triggered in the brain [by] a missing inhibitory connection or missing “brake” in the brain.” “Science Daily”, December 4, 2013.

19. Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice

Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: “I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Freud.” (runs 2 minutes)


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 2, October, 2013

October 30, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,887 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Just in time for Halloween, we present a newsletter full of tricks and treats. First, the trick: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Monster Needs (see link below). You may be as amazed as we were to discover that zombies, vampires, ghosts, and werewolves can all achieve self-actualization. Of course, like most jokes of this type, the more you know about the actual theory, the funnier the jokes seem. Brought to you by the Canadian English language TV comedy channel BiteTV. Also in keeping with the season, see our special ‘’Favorite Link Revisited’’ for how to incorporate the characters of ‘’Twilight’’ as case studies for various theorists including Maslow, Horney, Erikson and others.

For more tricks, Lego this month released new play figures, one of which is a woman scientist. But we couldn’t get all that excited about the stereotype-busting brainiac, because they also released ‘’Diner Waitress’’, ‘’Dirndl Girl’’, ‘’Grandma’’, and ‘’Lady Robot’’. Decked out in pink accessories and rosy cheeks, the Lady Robot claims to ‘’party like nobody else’’ according to the press release issued by Lego. You win some and you lose some we guess!

Finally, the treat. If you’ve ever wondered if you are living in the right place, check out the latest research by Peter Rentfrow and colleagues and the geographical ‘’Mood Map’’ created from their work below. According to the quiz (with dubious validity) it says that I should be in South Carolina or Georgia. Hmm, with the temperatures we’ve been having in Philly this week, that doesn’t sound like a bad idea.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Monster Needs

According to the Canadian English language TV comedy channel BiteTV, zombies, vampires, ghosts, and werewolves all have their belongingness and self-esteem needs and can achieve self-actualization.

3. Video Clips of Elements of Master Teaching

(2013) by Jeffrey R. Stowell (Eastern Illinois University) and R. Eric Landrum (Boise State University) is ”composed of 73 short YouTube videos of college teachers displaying qualities associated with elements of master teaching. Information about each clip is contained in a table that lists the clip length, course discipline, course level, and specific teacher behaviors demonstrated. Viewers can use YouTube’s built-in functions to submit comments and provide like/dislike ratings. The videos could be incorporated into teaching seminars, graduate student training, faculty development efforts, and research studies on the impact of viewing elements of master teaching behaviors. It is accessible from the general page (here) under the category title ”Faculty Development” or directly at link above.

4. Two Guys On Your Head: Locus of Control

”Two Guys on Your Head” is a short feature, produced at KUT Radio, that explores topics associated with the brain. In this episode, University of Texas Professors Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke explain what locus of control is and review the evidence which suggests that though people differ in their view of reality believing that they have control over their outcomes or not, we can change our perceptions to cope better — even giving up control as circumstances warrant. (Audio; runs 8 minutes).

5. How Dare You Say Narcissism Is Increasing?

To satisfy the critics — and the curious — Jean Twenge provides the psychological evidence behind her ”New York Times” article (available here) claiming that today’s young people are more narcissistic than previous generations. From ”Psychology Today”, August 12, 2013.

6. Self-Control and Stress

Art Markman explains the marshmallow test and research on delay of gratification and how it predicts positive outcomes and a better ability to deal with stress. From ”Psychology Today”, July 16, 2013.

7. Losing is Good for You

Ashley Marryman summarizes the research on praise and rewards and suggests that the best thing we can give kids is the opportunity to fail . . . and to learn from that failure. From ”The New York Times”, September 24, 2013.

8. 23andMe’s Designer Baby Patent

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office award a patent on ”gamete donor selection” to the company ”23andMe” that sells at-home DNA testing kits. This technology would ”enable prospective parents to handpick a sperm or egg donor with whom they would likely to produce a child born with certain traits that they desire”. Whether this information is empowering to potential parents or a modern twist on eugenics is something you and your students can debate. From ”The Huffington Post”, October 4, 2013.

9. Lego Unveils First Female Lego Scientist

The toy company Lego just announced a new line of miniature figures including, for the first time, a woman in a non-traditional career. The scientist Professor C. Bodin comes complete with two Erlenmeyer flasks. The hope is that by providing a character girls can relate to, young girls can more easily imagine themselves as succeeding in the sciences. From ”ABC News”, September 4, 2013.

10. Scientists Discover One of the Greatest Contributing Factors to Happiness — You’ll Thank Me Later

What happens when people write a gratitude letter to a special person in their lives and then call that person and read their letter out lout to them? The result is happiness, according to psychological research demonstrated by this feel-good video. Runs 7 minutes 14 seconds.

11. CBT Relapse Prevention

”In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes examples of the application of techniques such as mindfulness, acceptance, and validation. He also explains how these and other important techniques can be used to enhance relapse prevention.” Posted by the Beck Institute, October 9, 2013. Runs 4 minutes, 59 seconds

12. Proposed Treatment To Fix Genetic Diseases Raises Ethical Issues

NPR’s ”Morning Edition” reports that ”The federal government is considering whether to allow scientists to take a controversial step: make changes in some of the genetic material in a woman’s egg that would be passed down through generations.” From October 9, 2013. Listen to the full story and read the transcript here. Runs 5 minutes and 40 seconds.

13. Helen Neville on Experiential, Genetic and Epigenetic Effects on Human Neurocognitive Development

”Recent advances in neuroscience have effectively put an end to the “nature or nurture” debate. Instead, the focus of discussion has switched to mechanisms and brain-based interventions — in what ways are neural circuits changed by experience? When is the brain most receptive to education and learning? And what effects does high versus low socioeconomic status (SES) have on the development of neurocognition?” Helen Neville addresses these questions in her 2013 APS William James Fellow Award Address. Rums 50 minutes and 13 seconds.

14. Changing Brains

Helen Neville and her colleagues at the University of Oregon Brain Development Lab created this 12-part program to help parents, educators, policy-makers, and care-givers of young children understand how and when experience shapes the development of the human brain. Separate segments focus on vision, hearing, motor skills, attention, language, reading, math, music, and emotions and learning.

15. Can cognitive behavioural therapy really change our brains?

From the website: ”Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a type of talking therapy that’s used to treat a wide range of mental health problems, from depression and eating disorders to phobias and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It recommends looking at ourselves in a different way that might prove useful for all of us in everyday life. But what happens to our brains when we have CBT?” From BBC Science, August 6, 2013.

16. U.S. regions exhibit distinct personalities, research reveals

”Americans with similar temperaments are so likely to live in the same areas that a map of the country can be divided into regions with distinct personalities”, according to new research by Peter Rentfrow and colleagues summarized here in ”Science Daily”, October 17, 2013.

17. America’s Mood Map: An Interactive Guide to the United States of Attitude

”Using personality test data from over one million people, researchers have identified three distinct personality regions in the country. Here, each state is colored by the region it belongs to and shaded according to how strongly its personality matches that profile.” Features a map of the United States identifying which states are ”Friendly and Conventional”, ”Relaxed and Creative”, and ”Temperamental and Uninhibited” along with 10-item survey which lets visitors discover which state most closely matches their personality. From ”Time Magazine”, October 22, 2013.

18. How to Find the Best Workout for Your Personality

By taking account of a person’s BAS and BIS or traits like introversion, extroversion, and neuroticism, people can find a workout which best matches their personality leading to long term habits of exercise. Or, in the words of one of the researchers, ”Physical activity is just another expression of our personal preferences and style”.

19. Favorite Link Revisited: Twilight Deconstructed

Drawing on classic theorists including Carl Jung, Karen Horney, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers and others, Donna Ashcraft takes a psychological and feminist approach to understanding the ‘’Twilight’’ characters in her book ‘’Deconstructing Twilight: Psychological and Feminist Perspectives on the Series’’. Thanks to her publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., you can read and download a PDF of Chapter 7 in which she uses Karen Horney’s 10 neurotic needs to understand the dynamics between Bella and her parents, Bella and Edward and more. (opens in PDF format)


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 10, June, 2013

June 22, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-second Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,801 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are very excited to present a hard-to-find example of insecure infants in the Strange Situation. While it is easy to find videos of secure attachments between parents and their children in the strange situation, it is much harder to find good illustrations of insecure attachment. This brief clip shows how children with avoidant and ambivalent attachment react to maternal separation and reunion.

Also, this month it seems that we have amassed quite a few links to happiness research and positive emotions. And maybe that’s just the way it ought to be while summer is in full throttle. So, why fight it! Check out our Favorite Link Revisited for ways to increase the healing power of positive emotions in your life by having more fun this summer.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

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2. Chimpanzees’ Personas Seem More Complex Than People’s

Using the same techniques as the early (human) trait theorists did, Hani Freeman and her colleagues found evidence that chimpanzee personality consists of 6 dimensions. These include extroversion, agreeableness and openness, shared by humans, but also reactivity (related to the human trait of neuroticism, perhaps?), dominance and methodicalness which are not. Their research was published in the “American Journal of Primatology” and summarized here in “The Economist”, June 15, 2013.

3. Arrogant, Moi? Investigating Narcissists’ insight into Their Traits, Behavior and Reputation

Research by Erika Carlson and colleagues suggests that “Narcissists do have genuine insight into their narcissism” [but] “They seem to perceive narcissism as a ‘get ahead’ trait that brings them personal gain … a personal strength, and [they] justify their narcissism in terms of the benefits it has for them.” Read more in this summary from the “British Psychological Society Research Digest”, June 4, 3013.

4. Anxious? Activate Your Anterior Cingulate Cortex With a Little Meditation

Research by Fadel Zeidan and colleagues published in “Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience” found that area of the brain which regulate worrying are activated during mediation, leading to lowered anxiety according to this summary in “Science Daily”, June 4, 2013.

5. Secure, Insecure, Avoidant & Ambivalent Attachment in Mothers & Babies

This brief video clip features the analysis and voice-over of Everett Waters, as three mothers and babies react to the strange situation by showing patterns of secure, avoidant, or ambivalent/resistant attachment. Runs 3 minutes, 39 seconds.

6. The Strange Situation – Mary Ainsworth

This brief video clip illustrates the Strange Situation used to assess attachment using a 14-month old girl who shows secure attachment with her mother. Runs 3 minutes, 15 seconds.

7. How Positive Emotions Lead to Better Health

Research by Bethany Kok and colleagues suggests that “Positive emotion, positive social connections, and physical health influence one another in a self-sustaining, upward-spiral dynamic.” Read a summary of their research from “Psychological Science” here in “Pacific Standard”, May 8, 2013.

8.Teaching Students About the Sunny Side of Stress

Nathan DeWall and David G. Myers offer their advice and guidance about teaching an area of research recently highlighted in “Current Directions of Psychological Science”. In this column for the May/June 2013 APS “Observer” they discuss how people can use arousal reappraisal to lessen the experience of stress in both mind and body.

9. Teaching Students About How Simple, Positive Activities Can Increase Well-Being

Nathan DeWall and David G. Myers offer their advice and guidance about teaching an area of research recently highlighted in “Current Directions of Psychological Science”. In this column for the May/June 2013 APS “Observer” they discuss numerous classroom activities to illustrate the effect—how simple activities can increase well-being—and spark discussion.

10. Richard III: Psychopath or Mere Control Freak? Psychologists Weigh In

“Was England’s King Richard III (1452–85) a murderous psychopath? Thanks to Shakespeare’s play, the hunchbacked monarch has gone down in history as the heartless ruler who ordered the murders of the brother and young nephews who stood between him and the throne.” However, psychologists Mark Lansdale and Julian Boon of the University of Leicester re-analyzed Richard’s character using biographies and other written accounts. They conclude that “the king likely suffered from anxiety, not psychopathy” in this summary from the APA “Monitor on Psychology”, June 2013.

11. Transgender Today

“Throughout history, transgender people have been misunderstood and seldom studied. That’s beginning to change” according to this article by Eve Glicksman for the “APA Monitor on Psychology”, April 2013, volume 44, number 4, page 36.

12. The Psychology of Motivation Explained (in under 300 words)

According to Jeremy Dean of “PsyBlog”, the way to “harness the power of self-guiding, internal motivation” is to look for competence, autonomy, and relatedness in any activity. Read his succinct summary of the self-determination theory of motivation and engagement here.

13. It’s Nature, Not Nurture: Personality Lies in Genes, Twins Study Shows

“Genes play a greater role in determining key personality traits like social skills and learning ability than the way we are brought up by our parents”, according to research by Timothy Bates and colleagues in “The Journal of Personality” and summarized in this article from “The Telegraph”, May 16, 2013.

14. Could We Record Our Dreams?

“Have you ever wished your could record your dreams and watch them later? It may be possible sooner than you think” according to this video by Asap Science. While the premise may sound a bit like science fiction, the video does a great job of explaining the latest fMRI studies which do come eerily close to mind-reading. (runs 3 minutes, 55 seconds).

15. Social Connections Drive the ‘Upward Spiral’ of Positive Emotions and Health

“People who experience warmer, more upbeat emotions may have better physical health because they make more social connections” according to a study by  Barbara Fredrickson and Bethany Kok published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here by the Association for Psychological Science, May 8, 2013.

16. Facebook Profiles Raise Users’ Self-Esteem and Affect Behavior

“A Facebook profile is an ideal version of self, full of photos and posts curated for the eyes of family, friends and acquaintances. A new study shows that this version of self can provide beneficial psychological effects and influence behavior” according to research by Catalina Toma sand colleagues published in “Media Psychology” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, May 31, 2013.

17. Personality and Social Relationships

In 2008 a group of researchers established the “Personality and Social Relationships” or PERSOC group to help others integrate findings from social psychology and personality psychology. “PERSOC is based on the idea that the interplay of personality and social relationships is influenced by three classes of variables: dispositions (as measured by self-report questionnaires, indirect tests of personality or biological measures), cues (appearances, behaviors, and behavioral residues, as measured by direct observation), and interpersonal perceptions (as measured by other-reports at zero, short-term, or long-term acquaintance).” Their website contains a description of their work, tools for teaching and for statistical analysis, and links to important papers. Teaching materials are available in German with English versions to come.

18. Grandma’s Experiences Leave a Mark on Your Genes

This fascinating article explains the process of epigenetics and how “Your ancestors’ lousy childhoods or excellent adventures might change your personality, bequeathing anxiety or resilience by altering the epigenetic expressions of genes in the brain.” By Dan Hurley for “Discover Magazine”, May 2013.

19. Can Money Buy Happiness? 5 Smart Ways to Spend It

According to Michael Norton and Elizabeth Dunn, it can, if you know how to spend it. Check out these 5 suggestions from Erik Barker on his “Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog.

20. 10 Research-Based Steps to a Happier Life

What do Christopher Peterson, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Sonja Lyubomirsky and others suggest lead to a happier life? Check out these 10 suggestions by Erik Barker on his “Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: The Eight Irresistible Principles of Fun

Get focused, be creative, use your wisdom, take action and in the end have more fun in your life. This multi-media presentation is also available in a French and Spanish version.