Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 8, April 2015

April 30, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,139 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Though the semester is winding down around here, this newsletter brings you some of the latest links for teaching personality and keeping up with research findings in the field of personality. From Viktor Frankl to Neuroscience at the movies, from how much money MBTI types make to testing and attachment, there is sure to be something to inspire you below. Even if you are drowning in grading!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Neuro Psi Fi: The Brain Science Behind the Movies

Neuropsychologist Mary V. Spiers of Drexel University created and maintains this web page dedicated to show the brain science behind brain disorders and special abilities such as amnesia, autism, Tourette’s Syndrome, and others as illustrated in popular films. The page includes neuropsychological movie reviews in which the accuracy of the information portrayed in the film is evaluated in light of current research, and also brain resources, a blog, teaching resources, and more.

3. How We Elevate Each Other: Viktor Frankl on the Human Spirit and Why Idealism Is the Best Realism

In an excerpt from a 1972 lecture at the University of Toronto, Viktor Frankl “brimming with his humble wisdom and disarming wit… makes a beautiful case for believing in each other and viewing the human spirit with hope rather than cynicism.” Runs 4 minutes, 21 seconds.

4. The Weirdest Way People Communicate Their Happiness

Why is happiness so infectious? A new study published in the journal “Psychological Science” finds that people communicate their happiness to others through perspiration. Read about the study here in “PsyBlog”, April 17, 2015.

5. The Feeling That Expands Time and Increases Well-Being

Awe “that jaw-dropping moment when coming across something surprising, powerful, beautiful or even sublime can have a transformative effect” according to new research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here in “PsyBlog”, April 16, 2015.

6. 7 Science-Backed Signs You Work for a Narcissist

Research suggests that you are more likely to find a narcissist in the corner office than just about anywhere else. Find out why in this article from the “Business Insider”, April 27, 2015.

7. Is 10% of the Population Really Gay?

“Drawing on the widest survey of sexual behaviour since the Kinsey Report, David Spiegelhalter, in his book “Sex By Numbers”, answers key questions about our private lives. Here he reveals how Kinsey’s contested claim that 10% of us are gay is actually close to the mark”. From “The Guardian”, April 5, 2015.

8. The Personality Types That Make the Most Money

According to Truity Psychometrics, your Myers-Briggs personality type correlates with how much money you earn. Check out their graphic in “Business Insider”, April 20, 2015.

9. The Weird Psychological Reason Why Big Bonuses Can Demotivate Workers

“Given a choice between solving puzzles for free or for pay — which would you pick?” Based on Self-Determination Theory the answer may surprise you. Read about Autonomy and Competence here along with a third factor, Purpose, added by Daniel Pink. From “Business Insider”, April 7, 2015. You can hear Daniel Pink’s TED talk on the difference between incentivizing and intrinsic motivation here too (runs 18 minutes, 36 seconds).

10. Morning People (“Larks”) Are More Punctual Than “Owls”

Larks arrived more punctually than Owls to their morning lectures according to research published in “Current Psychology” and summarized here for The British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, March 16, 2015.

11. 3 More Reasons You Can’t Win With a Narcissist

A narcissist, a “profoundly selfish person who lacks empathy, makes you feel small and robs you of the happiness you deserve” can be difficult to deal with for these and other reasons. From “PsychCentral”, April 19, 2015.

12. People Are Overly Optimistic About the Benefits of Optimism

“This work doesn’t suggest that optimism is ineffective as a broad strategy for approaching life, or at helping us fulfill objectives at a broad scale. But it does suggest that we put more on the shoulders of optimism that it can bear” according to research published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” and summarized here for the British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, April 29, 2015.

13. Extraversion May Be Less Common Than We Think

New research suggests that Extrovert are over-represented in our social networks, which may overestimate the prevalence of extroversion in the population. This, according to research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here for “Science Daily”, April 6, 2015.

14. I (Don’t) Want 2 B w/ U: Texting, Sexting, and Avoidant Attachment

“Those who are high in avoidance tend to be uncomfortable with intimacy, want less closeness in their relationships, and distrust others more. And when it comes to electronic communication with partners, it turns out that avoidance also is related texting and sexting behaviors, but in different ways.” This, according to the Benjamin Le writing for “The Science of Relationships”, April 13, 2015.

15. Writing Exercises Scientifically Proven to Redirect Your Life

Inspired by the research of Timothy Wilson and others, writing exercises, like distancing yourself from negative experiences or determining what your best possible self looks like, may be beneficial according to Jane Porter writing for “Fast Company”, February 11, 2015.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: A Guide to Writing Learning Objectives for Teachers of Psychology (2012)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to announce this new resource for teachers by Guy A. Boysen of the State University of New York at Fredonia and McKendree University. The purpose of this 18-page resource is to assist psychology teachers in (a) understanding key terms related to objectives and their assessment, (b) writing behavior-based learning objectives, and (c) evaluating objectives once they are written. The resource includes a table that illustrates how various psychology outcomes can be addressed with objectives at various levels of Bloom’s taxonomy.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 7, March 2015

April 8, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,131 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The big news in the world of personality psychology is the opening of the Viktor Frankl Museum in his former residence in Vienna, Austria. The museum features exhibits, classes, lectures, and events. Check out the link below!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Viktor Frankl Museum

Frankl’s former residence in Vienna, Austria is now home to the Worldwide Viktor Frankl Museum. The museum features exhibits, classes, lectures, and events and “in the course of learning about the development of a genius, visitors also gain insight into their own opportunities and personal potential.”

3. Most Good People Have the Same Basic Life Story

“Psychology research verifies that the stories we tell ourselves matter. A new study from Northwestern University shows that folks who fit the classic mold of “good people” — those who care about others while also having high well-being and mental health — have life stories that share remarkably similar narrative arcs” according to research by Dan Mcdams and Jen Guo and summarized here for “Business Insider”, March 13, 2015.

4. Parents Make Nasty Little Narcissists?

Check out this research “that implies the Earth may have a few less narcissistic, self-centered personalities populating it if parents ditch overvaluing their child’s super-awesomeness to prevent them from potentially growing up into pedestal loving, manipulative, selfie-obsessed, nasty little narcissists” according to research by Eddie Brummelman and colleagues and summarized here by Carla Clark for “Brain Blogger”, March 9, 2015.

5. Men or Women? No Surprise Which Gender is More Narcissistic

Men are more narcissistic than women, on average, according to a new study published in the journal “Psychological Bulletin” by Emily Grijalva and colleagues and summarized here by Jeremy Dean for “PsyBlog”, March 5, 2015.

6. New Work Schedule Could Cure Your “Social Jetlag”

“Many of us are walking around all the time in a fog caused by ‘social jetlag.’ That’s what happens when we lose sleep because our daily schedules don’t match our bodies’ natural rhythms. The condition can be a particular problem for shift workers, who work into the night or on a shifting schedule. Now, researchers report that sleep and workers’ wellbeing could be improved if schedules took workers’ biological clocks into account.” This, according to new research by Till Roenneberg and published in the journal “Current Biology” and summarized here for “Science Daily”, March 12, 2015.

7. All About Awe: Science Explores How Life’s Small Marvels Elevate Cognition and Emotion

“The truly awesome encounters in life don’t reside in the everyday but rather in the experiences we have that are somehow magnificent and powerful. As cutting-edge research in psychological science is beginning to show […] that awe, though mysterious, is an emotion we shouldn’t take for granted, as it may have surprisingly meaningful consequences for everyday behavior and even overall well-being.” From The “APS Observer”, Volume 28 (4), April 2015.

8. An Upbeat Emotion That’s Surprisingly Good for You

“A new study singles out one surprising emotion as a potent medicine: awe. And happily, awe seems to be much easier to come by than many might expect, even for the busy and stressed-out. This, according to research by Dacher Keltner and colleagues published in the journal “Emotion” and summarized here for the New York Times, March 26, 2015.

9. The Lifetime Effects of Self-Control in Childhood

“In following a cohort of individuals from birth to their late 30s, Terrie Moffitt and her colleagues found that children who scored low on a variety of self-control measures at age 3 were more likely as adults to have criminal records, addictions, welfare dependency, low financial savings, bad credit ratings, and health problems compared with those who scored high on self-control as toddlers.” Watch her keynote address at the inaugural International Convention of Psychological Science in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, March 13, 2015 in this video. Runs 49 minutes and 2 seconds.

10. Favorite Link Revisited: Viktor Frankl

e-Textbook From the electronic textbook created for undergraduate and graduate courses in Personality Theories by George Boeree of Shippensburg University.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 1, September 2014

September 11, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,061 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Like us, we’re sure many of you are in the full swing of a new semester and a new school year. We’ll keep this newsletter short and sweet so you can go back to preparing your classes.

Special thanks go out this month to Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania who put together a PowerPoint presentation to help students use flashcards more effectively as a study tool. Their presentation is based on (a) what psychologists know about concept formation and (b) what psychologist know about memory. You can download via the link below. We thank them for giving Personality Pedagogy the opportunity to publish their presentation. Check it out!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Beyond Rote Memorization: New Ways to Use Flashcards to Learn, Remember, and Understand Concepts

Students often use flashcards, but they often do not use them effectively. This Powerpoint, created by Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania, shows students how to make and study flashcards effectively. Instructors can use this Powerpoint as a presentation or they can assign it to students as a tutorial. If used as a tutorial, professors can have students print out a results page that will tell professors how long students spent on the tutorial and how well they did on a quiz over the tutorial. Requires PowerPoint 2010 or later and, when prompted, users should choose to enable macros.

3. Freud’s City, From Couch to Cafes

Stephen Heyman, writing for ‘’The New York Times’’ researched and visited many of Freud’s favorite haunts in a city which he both loved and hated. From the cafe where the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society met to Leopoldstadt, the Jewish quarter in Freud’s day, to a medical history museum and Schloss Bellevue where Freud interpreted his first dream, Heyman describes places in Vienna where one can go to appreciate the import and life of Sigmund Freud.

4. The Mistake Everybody Makes With Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence isn’t just “being nice to people” nor is it unequivocally a good thing. This info graphic vividly illustrates what emotional intelligence is . . . and isn’t. From ”Business Insider”, August 18, 2014.

5. What Your Facebook Photos Say About Your Personality

According to research by Azar Eftekhar and colleagues, extroverts and people high in Neuroticism upload significant numbers of photos. However Extroverts tend to change their profile cover photos while people high in Neuroticism upload more photos per album. From ‘’Live Science’’, August 5, 2014.

6. The Best Jobs For Every Personality Type

This info graphic presents the five best jobs for each type of personality according to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Personality Test. From ”Business Insider”, September 4, 2014.

7. Can Fiction Stories Make Us More Empathetic?

‘’Exposure to narrative fiction may improve our ability to understand what other people are thinking or feeling, a researcher reports. Many stories are about people — their mental states, their relationships. The researcher explains that we understand stories using basic cognitive functions, and there is not a special module in the brain that allows us to do this. Understanding stories is similar to the way we understand the real world.’’ From ‘’Science Daily’’, August 11, 2014.

8. 4 Tips For Becoming Emotionally Resilient

Emotional resilience can be learned and this article presents 4 ways to help develop it. From ‘’Psych Central’’, September 11, 2014.

9. Epigenetics: Genes, Environment and The Generation Game
According to this article from ‘’The Guardian’’, September 6, 2014, ‘’New research claims that environmental factors affect not just an individual’s genes but those of their offspring too. Diabetes, obesity – even certain phobias – may all be influenced by the behaviour of our forebears’’.

10. How Trauma Can Help You Grow

Post-traumatic growth can help help survivors of traumatic events cope with their pain and recover from traumatic events. From ‘’U.S. News & World Report’’, September 8, 2014.

11. Reacting to Personal Setbacks: Do You Bounce Back or Give Up?

‘’Sometimes when people get upsetting news – such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review – they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened’’ according to new research mapping brain activity using fMRI scans published in the journal ‘’Neuron’’ and summarized here in ‘’Science Daily’’, September 4, 3014.

12. Science Explains Why Comedies Are Funnier When You See Them in a Crowded Theater

Research published in the journal ‘’Emotion’’ suggests that group attention intensifies emotions relative to attending alone. From ‘’Discover Magazine’’, September 2, 2014.

13. Favorite Link Revisited: The Science of Compassion and Resilience

Psychologist David DeSteno examines the science of compassion and resilience exploring new ideas for leveraging the mechanisms of the mind that enable them according to Maria Popova for Brain Pickings, October 22, 2012. Runs 18 minutes, 28 seconds.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 11, July 2014

July 22, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,030 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This has been a good month for personality psychologists and teachers of personality psychology. News sources and social media have been buzzing with interesting findings directly related to personality psychology. Perhaps you’ve heard about the infamous Facebook study on emotional contagion or seen the Verizon ad illustrating the social factors which can undermine young girls’ achievements in science and math? Or, like, um, you know, how that annoying “Teenspeak” language is actually related to personality or how friends share similar genes? And, have you ever wondered about the attachment style of contestants on the TV reality shows “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette”? Yes, we have all this and more for you in this month’s newsletter.

This month we have added a new page on “Testing and Personnel Selection”. This includes many links that were previously included in the “Tests and Measurement” page, which, by the way, is now named “Personality Assessment” to better reflect the current state of the field.

Quick, grab your favorite chilled drink, browse the links below and place your bets on how “The Bachelorette” will end next Monday, secure in your knowledge of personality!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Virtuous Cycles: Night Owls and Early Birds

New research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here by Wray Herbert suggests that there is an interaction between cognitive depletion and circadian fluctuations in tiredness. That is, people are more likely to cheat when they experience low energy, i.e., a dip in their biological clock. This suggests that early birds are likely to make bad choices later in the day and nights owls earlier in the day.

3. Powerful Ad Shows What A Little Girl Hears When You Tell Her She’s Pretty

According to the National Science Foundation, 66% of 4th grades girls say they like math and science, yet women make up only 18% of engineering majors in college. This Verizon commercial illustrates the social cues which may discourage girls from math and science during their early childhood. Runs 1 minute and 3 seconds.

4. Resilience: Motorcyclist Thrown After Crash, Walks Away

“I can either land on my feet or my head right now” is what was going through the mind of 24 year old Michael Smith as he was hit by a car while riding his motorcycle through an intersection in Florida. Amazingly, he flips head-over-heels, lands on his feet, and walks away. Runs 51 seconds.

5. The Secret of Effective Motivation

Psychologists Amy Wrzesniewski and Barry Schwartz summarize their research of the internal or instrumental motives of Cadets at the United States West Point Military Academy: “Our study suggests that efforts should be made to structure activities so that instrumental consequences do not become motives. Helping people focus on the meaning and impact of their work, rather than on, say, the financial returns it will bring, may be the best way to improve not only the quality of their work but also — counterintuitive though it may seem — their financial success.” From, “The New York Times”, July 4, 2014.

6. The Conscientiousness of Kidspeak

The “like”s and “you know”s ubiquitous in the language of 12-14 year olds are not, as parents bemoan, due to “sloppy indifference” but rather to “undue scrupulousness”. According to research by linguists at the University of Texas, youth high in Conscientiousness use these markers to signal that they have left out the details of what they are relating for the sake of economy. By Adam Gopnik for “The New Yorker”, July 20 2014.

7. Study Cracks How Brain Processes Emotions

From the website: “Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code [of neural activation] that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new study. “Despite how personal our feelings feel, the evidence suggests our brains use a standard code to speak the same emotional language,” one researcher concludes.” From “ScienceDaily”, July 9, 2014.

8. Research Ethics: The Facebook Experiment: Reaction From Psychologists

According to former psychology professor Michael Britt in his podcast “The Psych Files”: “You’ve probably heard about the controversy over the Facebook manipulation of user’s News Feeds and the (possible) effect this had on user’s emotions. In the latest episode of The Psych Files I summarize the study and my conclusions about it. Also included on the website is a (large) concept map that also summarizes the study, links to references and Facebook’s official response. Also included in the map and the episode: suggestions for students regarding how a proper informed consent form might have been written and presented to students.” Episode 22, July 1, 2014. Runs 33 minutes and 16 seconds.

9. Do Friends Have Similar Genomes?

According to research by James Fowler and Nicholas Christakis, “We are more genetically similar to our friends than we are to strangers. […] Looking at differences between nearly 2,000 people, recruited as part of a heart study in a small US town, they found that friends shared about 0.1% more DNA, on average, than strangers.” From “BBC News”, July 15, 2014.

10. 7 Ways You Can Easily Increase Your Willpower

Eric Barker of the “Barking Up The Wrong Tree” blog presents these 7 evidence-based ways of increasing your willpower in your daily life. July 20, 2014.

11. 11 Interview Questions Hiring Managers Ask To Test Your Personality

From the website: “In an effort to find new hires that are great cultural fits, employers are putting more emphasis on soft skills, or intangible qualities […] some qualities that are a good indication of success in a role include organizational and communication skills, great team player, strong leadership skills, an ability to think on your feet, drive, and initiative.” From “Business Insider”, June 11, 2014.

12. Here’s How Amazing Leaders Adapt to Crazy Situations

According to research by clinical psychologist Leslie Patch, personality profiling of executives at GE, McDonald’s, Merrill Lynch, and more, found that active coping is the greatest predictor of managerial success. From “Business Insider”, June 20, 2014.

13. New Social Media Study Investigates Relationships Among Facebook Use, Narcissism and Empathy

A study by Tracy Alloway and colleagues and summarized here for “ScienceDaily” suggests that a some features of Facebook, like profile photos are linked to narcissism, while others, like chatting are linked to empathy. According to Alloway, “Every narcissist needs a reflecting pool. Just as Narcissus gazed into the pool to admire his beauty, social networking sites, like Facebook, have become our modern-day pool.” July 3, 2014.

14. What Attachment Style is The Bachelorette’s Andi Dorfman?

Erica Djossa writing for the “Science of Relationships” blog explains her evidence for why this latest eligible lady from the reality TV series may have secure attachment, even though secure attachment doesn’t make for “juicy reality TV”.

15. How Your Mood Changes Your Personality

Research by Jan Querengässer and Sebastian Schindler found “When participants answered questions about their personality in a sad state, they scored “considerably” higher on trait neuroticism, and “moderately” lower on extraversion and agreeableness, as compared with when they completed the questionnaire in a neutral mood state”. From “BPS Research Digest”, July 17, 2014.

16. Self-Motivation: How “You Can Do it!” Beats “I Can Do It”

Research by Sanda Dolcos and Dolores Albarracín published in the “European Journal of Social Psychology” and summarized here for the “BPS Research Digest” suggests that second-person self-talk (e.g., “You can do it!”) is more effective than first-person self-talk. The researchers surmised that second-person talk may be effective because it “cues memories of receiving support and encouragement from others, especially in childhood”. July 9, 2014.

17. Favorite Link Revisited: Making Connections: Social Issues in the Psychology Classroom

Susan Goldstein of the University of Redlands established and maintains this site to: provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum. The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources, pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies, and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 10, June 2014

June 19, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,012 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, to celebrate the end of the school year and the start of summer we present a mixed-bag of very interesting links: laughter, dog treats, extroverts on Mars, healthy eating, Legos, Leo Tolstoy and much, much more. We hope that these will inspire you to think about personality and your teaching of personality psychology in new ways over the summer.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Dogs Like Treats, But Here’s What Really Gets Their Tails Wagging

It’s autonomy and competence, according to a study published in “Animal Cognition” and summarized here for “The Huffington Post”. According to the researchers, “The experimental animals in our study were excited not only by the expectation of a reward, but also about realizing that they themselves could control their access to the reward.” Posted June 16, 2014.

3. Extroverts Don’t Belong on Mars

A new study by Suzanne Bell and colleagues and summarized here for “The Atlantic”, finds that Extroverts, with their outgoing personalities, may not be suited for long, isolated voyages. Better go with the strong, silent, Introverts instead. Posted June 13, 2014.

4. The Role of Personality and Psychology in Healthy Eating

Can an understanding of personality and the five factors in particular help people to eat healthier? Patrick Fagan writing for “PsychCentral” thinks so. Posted June 12, 2014.

5. The Power of Our Personal Stories

Margarita Tartakovsky, writing for “PsychCentral” explains how revising our stories and our perceptions of problems can empower us. Posted June 15, 2014.

6. Leo Tolstoy on Finding Meaning in a Meaningless World

Maria Popova for “Brain Pickings” describes how Leo Tolstoy experienced depression and suicidal thoughts which led to “A Confession”, his meditation on the meaning of life. Posted June, 2014.

7. Lego To Launch Female Scientists Series After Online Campaign

According to this news report, “Women in science are taking one tiny, plastic step forward after Lego announced on Tuesday it will launch a series of female scientists and their lab tools. The science-themed project was selected as the latest Lego Ideas winner, and is set to hit shelves in August 2014. The series – notably devoid of pink – includes an astronomer with a telescope, a paleontologist with a dinosaur skeleton and a chemist in a lab.” The project idea was submitted by Dr Ellen Kooijman, a geochemist in Stockholm. In her project proposal, Kooijman wrote: “The motto of these [s]cientists is clear: explore the world and beyond!”. From “The Guardian”, June 4, 2014.

8. Self-Affirmation: A Simple Exercise That Actually Helps

According to research published in the “Annual Review of Psychology” and summarized here for “PsychCentral”, one effective way of affirming our values and strengths is to revise our narratives. Published June 2, 2014.

9. How To Get A Narcissist to Feel Empathy

Narcissists can feel empathy if they put themselves in another person’s shoes according to research by Erica Hepper and colleagues, published in the “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here for “PsyBlog”, May 2014.

10. Laugh Often to Live Well

According to “Brain Blogger”: “Humor and mirth offer a multitude of preventive and healing effects and a new study is offering more evidence that laughter has quantifiable benefits for the brain”. Posted May 10, 2014.

11. Dog People vs. Cat People: Who’s More Outgoing? More Intelligent?

“Dog people and cat people really do have different personalities. People who said they were dog lovers in the study tended to be more lively — meaning they were more energetic and outgoing — and also tended to follow rules closely. Cat lovers, on the other hand, were more introverted, more open-minded and more sensitive than dog lovers. Cat people also tended to be non-conformists, preferring to be expedient rather than follow the rules.” This, according to research by Denise Guastello and colleagues and summarized here for “LiveScience”, May 27, 2014.

12. Hello Stranger

What happens when strangers are enticed to break the unwritten “no eye contact” rule? Positive emotions! Read about this research by Nicholas Epley and Juliana Schroeder in this piece from the “New York Times”, April 25, 2014.

13. Viktor Frankl on the Art of Presence As a Lifeboat in Turbulent Times and What Suffering Teaches Us About the Meaning of Life.

Maria Popova for “Brain Pickings” describes Frankl’s concept of presence which comes from “accepting [one’s] suffering as a task”. Posted March, 2014.

14. Thrill Seeker or Chill Seeker?

Ken Carter designed this online version of the Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking Scale. You can take the 40-item test and the site will tell you how you score overall and on the individual subscales of Boredom Susceptibility, Disinhibition, Experience Seeking, and Thrill & Adventure Seeking. Bonus: respondents’ results are combined to draw a map of sensation seeking scores around the world and within the United States.

15. Dr. Ken Carter

This web page of Clinical psychologist, speaker, and science writer Ken Carter contains many background resources on sensation seeking including audio and videos describing what sensation is and isn’t, links to a sensation seeking quiz, world heat maps of sensation seeing, press releases and more.

16. Resilience: Why It’s Vital and How to Enhance It

From the website: “You can’t always get what you want, but resilience helps you feel good anyways.”. From “Psychology Today”, June 6, 2013.

17. The Obstacle Is the Way

From the website: “the principle of changing poison into medicine explains that we can transform even the most horrific tragedy into the very thing we need to become happier than we currently are”. From “Psychology Today”, May 4, 2014.

18. Is There Hope for the Insecurely Attached?

Yes, according to Erica Djossa writing for “Science of Relationships”. In this piece she describes two categories of secure attachment: continuous secures and earned-secures. Earned-secures started out with an insecure attachment in infancy that developed into a secure attachment style later. This provides evidence for a secure buffering effect in which an insecure individual may come to show more secure attachment behaviors if they are in a relationship with a secure partner.

19. Here’s How Being Neurotic can Make you More Successful

Despite tendencies towards anxiety, depression, and mood swings, people who are high in Neuroticism tend to be strivers, whose proclivity for rumination may pay off in the right environment, like academia or knowledge-based work. From “Business Insider”, May 9, 2014.

20. Favorite Link Revisited: Electronic Texts Available on the Internet

Did you know that you can find electronic articles and writings free on the internet to supplement your personality course? Links to original writings by Sigmund Freud, Erik Erikson, Carl Jung, Kurt Lewin, Niccolò Machiavelli, Abraham Maslow, Henry Murray, Carl Rogers, B.F. Skinner and more including an e-textbook in Personality Psychology by George Boeree of Shippensburg University are available here at PersonalityPedagogy.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 5, January 2014

January 27, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,930 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy New Year! And for many of you, Happy New Semester! We have quite the newsy newsletter this month, starting with a strange and disturbing crime: vandals attempted to steal the ancient Greek urn containing the ashes of Sigmund Freud and his wife Martha Bernays. The vase was damaged in the process and is now kept in a more secure location.

Also, 2013 ended with an exciting and controversial new finding suggesting that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. But before you let the news go to your head (so to speak) check out the astute critique of the research and interpretation of the evidence by cognitive psychologist Christian Jarrett.

Finally, you may have noticed that we’ve spruced the place up a bit. We are in the process of adding photos and changing the page layout to make the site more readable.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Urn Containing Sigmund Freud’s Ashes Smashed During Theft Attempt

“Staff at the crematorium in Golders Green discovered broken pieces of the urn, which dates from around 300BC and came from Freud’s collection of antiquities, lying on the floor on New Year’s Day, after thieves apparently broke in overnight and smashed it in the attempt to steal it.” The severely damaged urn was subsequently moved to a secure location according to staff at the crematorium. From “The Guardian”, January 15, 2014.

3. Male and Female Brains Wired Differently, Scans Reveal

According to research by Madhura Ingalhalikar and colleagues and summarized here “Scientists have drawn on nearly 1,000 brain scans to confirm what many had surely concluded long ago: that stark differences exist in the wiring of male and female brains.” Evidence suggests that men’s brains have more connectivity within each hemisphere; women have more connectivity between the hemispheres. From “The Guardian”, December 2, 2013.

4. Getting in a Tangle Over Men’s and Women’s Brain Wiring

Christian Jarrett for “Brain Watch” takes a critical view of the research and the interpretation of the evidence suggesting that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. Posted December 4, 2013.

5. Is Narcissism Essential for Success?

The Association for Psychological Science reports the results of a study which suggests that “While narcissists are more likely to garner leadership positions, there was no evidence of a link between narcissism and a leader’s success . . . the poorest leaders are those with either extremely high or extremely low levels of narcissism.” January 17, 2014.

6. B. F. Skinner at the APA Annual Convention 1990

“Behavioral psychologist Dr. B. F. Skinner presented this keynote address at the American Psychological Association’s 1990 Annual Convention. In Dr. Skinner’s last public appearance, he expresses his belief that the proper role for psychological science is the analysis of behavior. He speaks about the path psychology has followed over the years, from early introspection methods to three kinds of variation and selection, including natural selection, the evolution of operant conditioning, and the evolution of culture.” August 10, 1990. (in English with Spanish subtitles). Runs 20 minutes, 56 seconds.

7. Nicholas Claus: Big Five for the Big Guy

Heather A. Haas wrote this humorous “case study” of Santa Claus using the big five. Find out whether the big guy is high or low on Extraversion Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism and Openness and the “evidence” she used to make her judgements in “Dialogue”, the newsletter of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, volume 19 (1), Spring 2004, p. 24-25, 21.

8. Parents Sinking Some Kids With Their Puffed-up Praise, Study Finds

Research by Eddie Brummelman and colleagues suggests that “Moms and dads who bathe kids in exaggerated flattery to boost low self-esteem are stifling the very children they hope to elevate, a new study shows.” From “NBC News”, January 3, 2014.

9. Should Every Kid Get a Trophy Just for Participating?

SportzEdge.com presents this discussion by their commentators on whether children ought to get a trophy just for participating. Presents some interesting ideas to get your students thinking. Runs 7 minutes, 11 seconds.

10. Editing Your Life’s Stories Can Create Happier Endings

This piece from the NPR program “All Things Considered” uses the example of the author Lulu Miller’s nephew to illustrate the work of psychologist Tim Wilson. “Wilson has been studying how small changes in a person’s own stories and memories can help with emotional health. He calls the process “story editing” And he says small tweaks in the interpretation of life events can reap huge benefits.” From January 1, 2014. Includes a link to listen to the story, which runs 8 minutes, 54 second.

11. The Meaningful Life is a Road Worth Traveling

“A Stanford research project explored the key differences between lives of happiness and meaningfulness. While the two are similar, dramatic differences exist – and one should not underestimate the power of meaningfulness. “The quest for meaning is a key part of what makes us human,” ” Jennifer Aaker and her colleagues concluded. From the “Stanford News”, January 1, 2014.

12. A Case Study Using CBT

The Australian Institute of Professional Counselors presents this excerpt from a counseling session of an actual client to illustrate the four basic steps of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: identify the automatic thought, question the validity of the automatic thought, and challenge core beliefs. Posted March 22, 2010.

13. CBT in Action: A Case Study

Dr. Nicholas Jenner, a counseling psychologist, illustrates how the use of Daily Mood Sheets can help clients see the the feelings and emotions caused by a triggering event. He presents this case study of “Jodie” and how she was able to recognize her problematic thought patterns and where they came from through therapy.

14. Psychologists Put the ‘Selfie’ On the Couch

Psychologists Lisa Obran and Andrew Przybylski explore both the positive (e.g., “self exploration and identity experimentation” in the service of relatedness needs and identity formation) and the negative (e.g.,”indulg[ing] in a narcissistic activity”) sides of selfies in this video for the #BBCtrending program. (runs 1 minute, 29 seconds).

15. Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over

“When a team of scientists in Finland asked people to map out where they felt different emotions on their bodies, they found that the results were surprisingly consistent, even across cultures.” From NPR Health News, December 30, 2013.

16. The Orchid Effect: How Relationships and Genetics Influence Your Health

Research by S. C. Suth and R. F. Krueger, published in “Psychological Science” found evidence for a genotype-environment interaction or “an orchid effect” in which “really bad marriages are capable of turning on (and even amplifying) any genetic predispositions one might have to experiencing poor health. But really good marriages may help “good health” genes thrive more so than they would have otherwise.” From the “Science of Relationships” blog, December 2, 2013.

17. Fearful ‘Memories’ Passed Between Generations Through Genetic Code

Jeremy Dean of PsyBlog summarizes a study by Dias and Ressler (2013) which found evidence that mice who were conditioned to become afraid of a particular smell passed that fear onto their offspring. Could this transgenerational genetic response happen in humans? That’s the big question. Published December 5, 2013.

18. Missing “Brake in the Brain” Can Trigger Anxiety

According to research published in the journal “Cerebral Cortex” and summarized here “social phobias and fear can be triggered in the brain [by] a missing inhibitory connection or missing “brake” in the brain.” “Science Daily”, December 4, 2013.

19. Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice

Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: “I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Freud.” (runs 2 minutes)


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 1, September, 2013

October 1, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,856 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we bring you an unprecedented number of links to invigorate your personality classes, including a 3-part battle between the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and critics who find it lacks validity. In addition, just in time for you to prepare for Halloween next month, we found one of the strangest links yet. Our friend Michael Britt, he of The Psych Files, presents this highly original and unforgettable way of helping students keep the Psychosexual Stages straight. Freud as a zombie! Yes, you heard it here first, folks. As if arm wrestling with Freud wasn’t scary enough… As a chaser, we let Freud speak for himself in his own voice in our Favorite Link Revisited.

This month we want to give a special shout-out to Personality Pedagogy friends Kelvin Seifert and Zsuszanna Szabo at the Teaching Ed Psych Wiki. Sponsored by the Teaching Educational Psychology special interest group of the American Educational Research Association, The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki tries to be especially thorough. They are open to submissions and suggestions so check them out at the link below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki

The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki is a “collection of materials helpful in teaching introductory educational psychology in teacher education programs” including class activities and demonstrations, course assignments, course syllabi, and materials on specific topics within educational psychology.

3. How to Memorize Freud’s Stages of Psychosexual Development

From the site: “Need to memorize Freud’s stages of psychosexual development for a test? Here’s a mnemonic that should do the trick. In this brief video, the founder of psychoanalysis gives you a mnemonic and explains the 5 stages for you. What do orangutans and ogres have to do with Freud’s stages? They’ll help you remember them, that’s what. Find out how in this video episode” of “The Psych Files” podcast, Episode 202, September 7, 2013. (runs 4 minutes, 43 seconds).

4. Say Goodbye to MBTI, The Fad That Won’t Die

Wharton professor and author Adam Grant explains how a good personality test ought to have reliability, validity, and be independent and comprehensive. He describes what these standards are and proceeds to weigh the evidence and concludes that the Myers-Briggs Personality Inventory is not a very good personality test. Posted September, 2013.

5. MBTI, If You Want Me Back, You Need to Change Too

A follow up to the previous article (Say Goodbye to the MBTI), Wharton professor and author Adam Grant explains what needs to happen in order for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to become a better personality test. He writes his critiques in the very entertaining form of a letter to a former love.

6. The Myers-Briggs Assessment is No Fad

In response to Wharton professor and author Adam Grant’s previous essays critiquing the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPP, the company which publishes the MBTI and trains test administrators, published this rejoinder defending their product.

7. Online Psychology Laboratory

According to the website, “OPL provides highly interactive resources for the teaching of psychological science. The peer-reviewed materials include online studies and correlational studies, large data sets, demonstrations, and teaching aids.”

8. The Link Between Personality and Immunity

Research suggests that “basic personality markers — extraversion, hostility, and optimism among them — do seem to play a role in how well someone wards off sickness.” Read about the latest findings here in the Association for Psychological Science “Observer”, September, 2013.

9. Abraham Maslow and the pyramid that beguiled business

The BBC News Magazine takes a look at the question “The psychologist Abraham Maslow’s theory of human motivation is 70 years old but continues to have a strong influence on the world of business. What is it, and is it right?” August 31, 2013.

10. How Evolution Works, Animated in Minimalist Motion Graphics

This simple and engaging cartoon explains the basics of evolution and “why DNA copying errors explain blue eyes”. Runs 11 minutes 48 seconds. Warning: contains a cartoon depiction of sex at 4:13.

11. 23 Signs You’re Secretly a Narcissist Masquerading as a Sensitive Introvert

Past research has suggested that there are two types of Narcissism: “Grandiosity-Exhibitionism” and “Vulnerability-Sensitivity”. While both types share a common core of traits including conceit, arrogance, and “the tendency to give in to one’s own needs and disregard others” they present differently according to research summarized in this article. Includes a 23-item scale measuring Hypersensitive Narcissism.

12. Hypersensitive Narcissism Scale

This 23-item scale was recently presented by Jonathan Cheek, Holly Hendin, and Paul Wink at the 2013 Association for Research in Personality conference.

13. 23 Signs You’re Secretly An Introvert

From the website: “Think you can spot an introvert in a crowd? Think again. Although the stereotypical introvert may be the one at the party who’s hanging out alone by the food table fiddling with an iPhone, the “social butterfly” can just as easily have an introverted personality” according to this illustrated article from “The Huffington Post”, August 29, 2013.

14. 31 Unmistakable Signs That You’re An Introvert

“BuzzFeed” put together this entertaining series of gifs illustrating what it’s like to be an introvert.

15. Psychology Teaching Ideas: A Blog for Teachers of AS and A2 Psychology

Experienced teacher of A Level Psychology in the UK, Caroline Rigby created this blog “for teachers of A Level Psychology. Posts on this blog include ideas to keep teaching topical by using Psychology related news and publications in the classroom and ways to ensure students experience Psychology at A Level in a way that equips them with the thinking and study skills for future study.”

16. Is Baby Male or Female? Germans Offer Third Gender

In Germany, newborn babies with ambiguous genitalia will no longer be rigidly labeled male or female on their birth certificates. Parents may indicate “undetermined” or “unspecified”, wait until later in the child’s life to declare a gender, or even never officially declare a gender. From “ABC News”, August 22, 2013.

17. Attachment Explained: Peppermint Patty, Lucy van Pelt, Schroeder, and Charlie Brown…

Bartholomew and Horowitz’ four categories of attachment are visualized using characters from the classic cartoon “Peanuts”.

18. 7 Persistent Myths about Introverts and Extroverts

PsychCentral presents this list of myths from the one that introverts are shy and don’t make good public speakers to the one that extroverts are shallow and don’t like quiet time.

19. The Dance Between Codependents & Narcissists

This article from “PsychCentral” describes the “codependency dance” between the narcissistic taker/controller and the codependent pleaser/fixer.

20. Why Parenting Can Never Have a Rule Book: Children’s Genetics Significantly Affect How They Are Parented

A meta-analysis published in the October 2013 “Personality and Social Psychology Review” by Reut Avinun and Ariel Knafo describes how individual parenting styles may be a reaction to the child’s genotype in this summary from “Science Daily”, September 3, 2013.

21. Men and Women Are the Same Species!

“Similarities between the sexes can be as important as differences” according to this summary of areas of differences and similarity between the sexes by Agustín Fuentes for “Psychology Today”, May 24, 2012.

22. So, What’s Your Story?

“What are some of the harmful stories you tell about yourself, and how could you rewrite those stories to be more supportive and nurturing of who you really are?” Read about how we can change the stories we tell about ourselves by Melissa Kirk for “Psychology Today”, April 27, 2012.

23. Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice

Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: “I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 1, September, 2013


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 7, March, 2013

March 26, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,752 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

One-hundred and eight years ago today psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl was born in Austria. This would be a good time to reflect upon the lessons on finding meaning Frankl presented in his moving book “Man’s Search for Meaning”. Our first link is to a very moving summary of the book in words and pictures by Maria Popova for her “Brain Pickings” blog.

There are two sides to every story, and this month we present you with the pros and cons of a new initiative endorsed by President Obama this month: The Brain Activity Map. The goal is that neuroscientists will join their efforts to map areas of the brain the way scientists decoded the human genome a few years back. But is it even possible to identify all of the areas of brain function, and is localization even the best way to understand brain functioning? See the links below for more on this controversial proposal.

Speaking of the other side to stories, check out the softer side of B. F. Skinner. Thanks to Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” we have links and sound clips of Skinner discussing compassion, music, a love of reading and other topics. Britt argues that Skinner and his theories are more complicated than you might have first thought.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Happy Birthday, Viktor Frankl: Timeless Wisdom on the Human Search for Meaning

In recognition of Viktor Frankl’s birthday, science writer Maria Popova summarizes Frankl’s theory and how we create meaning out of purposeful work, love, and courage in the face of difficulty, using excerpts from his work and photos of Frankl and others.

3. Brain Activity Map Proponents Explain Goals of Blood Neuroscience

Science writer Stephanie Pappas explains “Neuroscientists are pushing for a major project that would map the activity of the brain, potentially illuminating the causes of depression, schizophrenia and other major mental health disorders” in this article from “LiveScience”, March 7, 2013.

4. What’s Wrong With the Brain Activity Map Proposal

“With the president suggesting a multibillion-dollar neuroscience effort, a leading neuroscientist explains the deep conceptual problems with plans to record all the brain’s neurons” in this article by Partha Mitra in “Scientific American”, from March 5, 2013.

5. What Was B.F. Skinner Really Like?

According to Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast, “Would you be surprised to learn that B.F. Skinner was a very likable guy and that you may actually be very much in agreement with his ideas? Many people who study psychology have a negative impression of Skinner. Well, I’m about to challenge those impressions by presenting a side of Skinner you probably haven’t been exposed to. In these sound bytes you’ll hear his ideas about learning to play music, about discovery, having fun and becoming the most that you can be.” From episode 191 posted March 11, 2013 (runs 32 minutes, 35 seconds).

6. Skinner on Compassionate Behavior

Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast presents this audio clip of B.F. Skinner on compassion: “Listen to B. F. Skinner as he explains how he believes we can get people to be more compassionate as they deal with old people, prisoners, psychiatric patients and the developmentally delayed (which in his day were referred to commonly as ‘retardates’). Note that he is more in favor of rewarding positive behavior than in implementing ‘aversive controls’ also note that he speaks of how important knowledge is in treating people with these needs” (runs 2 minutes, 31 seconds).

7. Skinner on Learning to Love Reading

Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast presents this audio clip of B. F. Skinner talking about reading. “In another surprisingly “humanistic” interview with B.F. Skinner he discusses what he thinks we can do to make learning to read fun. ‘Fun’? and ‘Skinner’? Yup. There are more sides to Skinner than we sometimes think about after we’ve had only a basic course in psychology” (runs 3 minutes and 31 seconds).

8. Skinner on Learning to Play Music

Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast presents this audio clip of B.F. Skinner talking about learning to play music. As Britt explains, Skinner “has, unfortunately, suffered from a bad reputation. Listen to how he explains his own experiences learning to play the piano and his suggestions for how children might come to love playing music if we introduce it into their lives correctly. If you didn’t know it was his voice you probably wouldn’t guess this was him speaking” (runs 1 minute, 40 seconds).

9. Gender Trouble

Summarizes the work of Judith Butler who argues that gender identity is a social construction.

10. The Bechdel Test For Media Bia

According to the Feminist Frequency website by media critic Anita Sarkeesian: “The Bechdel Test is a simple way to gauge the active presence of female characters in Hollywood films and just how well rounded and complete those roles are. It was created by Allison Bechdel in her comic strip ‘Dykes to Watch Out For’ in 1985”. The test is: (1) Does the film have at least two [named or otherwise central character] women in it, (2) who talk to each other, (3) about something besides a man? (runs 2 minutes, 3 seconds). You and your students can use this test to see how popular movies, especially those winning Oscars or other top awards, fare. See here for a discussion of similar tests for other types of bias in the media.

11. Humanistic Theory and Therapy Applied to the Psychotic Individual

Ann Reitan describes how therapy in general, and humanistic therapy in particular, can be helpful to a psychotic person. Focusing on the theory and techniques of Carl Rogers, and especially his notions of conditions of worth and unconditional positive regard, she describes how therapy could help a person with schizophrenia.

12. The Stories That Bind Us

Writer Bruce Feiler describes research which suggests that the stories families tell about themselves inspire resilience in future generations. From “The New York Times”, March 15, 2013.

13. How You Can Be a Better Storyteller

Eric Barker, of the “Barking Up The Wrong Tree” blog presents this interview with UCLA Film School Professor Howard Suber. Along the way, Suber reveals the power of a narrative to define — and change — our lives. Posted March 4, 2013.

14. Can People’s Personalities Change?

“Instead of personality being set in stone at 30, now evidence is emerging that there is some change. In fact people don’t give exactly the same answers to personality questionnaires at different times in their lives” according to research by Boyce et al., published in “Social Indicators Research” and summarized here in “PsyBlog”, February 25, 2013.

15. World of Warcraft: Why People Play is Linked to their Personality

John Grohol reviews research by Graham and Gosling (2013) which found that people play “World of Warcraft” for different reasons linked to their personality and that the experience of playing is different for people depending on their levels of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. Posted March 18, 2013.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: “I Was Not A Lab Rat”

Deborah Skinner’s essay about growing up as the baby in the box.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 8, April, 2012

April 22, 2012

Hello and welcome to the sixty-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,495 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, we welcome a new site for teachers of psychology: Making Connections. Funded by a grant from the Association for Psychological Science (APS) Fund for Teaching and Public Understanding of Psychological Science, Susan Goldstein established this site ”to provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum.” The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources; pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies; and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues. Check it out at http://makingconnections.redlands.edu.

Also this month, we just discovered — and perhaps you are ahead of us in this — a photo stream on Flickr posted by ”Psychology Pictures”. This stream features graphics of thought-provoking psychology-related quotes printed over striking photos. The result are some very inspiring images that will liven up a slide presentation, a web site, or even your office door. The site also features photos of famous psychologists, should you be looking for one of those.

Finally, for those of you who could use some comic relief at this point in the semester that happens to be personality-related, check out http://make-everything-ok.com/. This ”button” promises to make everything better, but just in case it doesn’t, it urges you to check your perceptions, a good entree into the cognitive perspective with your students.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Making Connections

Susan Goldstein of the University of Redlands established and maintains this site to: ”provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum.” The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources; pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies; and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues.

3. Psychology Pictures Photostream on Flickr

This Flickr photostream features graphics of thought-provoking psychology-related quotes printed over striking photos. The result are some very inspiring images that will liven up a slide presentation, a web site, or even your office door. The site also features photos of famous psychologists.

4. Childhood Adversity Can Lead to Genetic Changes

”Childhood adversity may lead to epigenetic changes in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene, an important regulator of the biological stress response that may increase risk for psychiatric disorders” according to research published in ”PLoS ONE” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, February 29, 2012.

5. Helping Children to Succeed

”Children may perform better in school and feel more confident about themselves if they are told that failure is a normal part of learning, rather than being pressured to succeed at all costs” according to research published in the ”Journal of Experimental Psychology” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, March 13, 2012.

6. Self-Regulation: Video Talk by Roy Baumeister

Roy Baumeister presents this talk to the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, an organization committed to finding innovative practical solutions to today’s social challenges, explaining why ”willpower and self-control is one of the most important aspects of individual and societal wellbeing” (runs 15 minutes and 50 seconds).

7. Carl Jung’s Five Key Elements to Happiness

In 1960, when asked by a journalist, ”What do you consider to be more or less basic factors making for happiness in the human mind?”, Jung identified these five elements.

8. A Jungian Approach to Fairy Tales

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #293, February 3, 2012). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Tom Elsner about fairy tales and their interpretation from a Jungian perspective.

9. The Situation of Ability: Gender Differences in Mental Rotation Deconstructed

In this article by Scott Barry Kaufman from the ”Huffington Post” (1/9/2012) he takes a look at the standard mental rotation task and considers the role of spatial ability, expectations, confidence, and stereotype threat on gender differences in this ability.

10. Revising Your Story

Social psychologist Tim Wilson argues that a better way of changing behavior may be ”to try to get inside [people’s] heads and understand how they see the world—the stories and narratives they tell themselves” according to this article in the American Psychological Association ”Monitor on Psychology”, March 2012, volume 43, number 3, p. 28.

11. Self-Determination Theory: Tips to Keeping New Year’s Resolutions

According to Ed Deci ”the best way to keep on track with your goals for the new year is to think hard about why you’re pursuing them”.

12. The Happy Secret to Better Work

From the website: ”We believe that we should work to be happy, but could that be backwards? In this fast-moving and entertaining talk from TEDxBloomington, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that actually happiness inspires productivity.” (Runs 12 minutes, 21 seconds)

13. Royalty-free Images From the United States Government

Librarians at SUNY Albany put together this list of links to collections of images from the United States Government which may be free to use. They include Federal photo collection, NASA and NOAA images, National Park Service photos and much more (opens in PDF format).

14. Reflections on Carl Rogers

According to the website: ”Digging into the history of psychological science, the Observer has retrieved classic interviews with prominent psychological scientists for an ongoing series Psychology (Yesterday and) Today. Each interview is introduced by a contemporary psychological scientist, and the full text of the interview is available on the Observer website. We invite you to reflect on the words of these legendary scientists, and decide whether their voices still resonate with the science of today.”

15. Exuberance for Novelty Has Benefits

”Novelty-seeking is one of the traits that keeps you healthy and happy and fosters personality growth as you age,” says psychiatrist C. Robert Cloninger, ”It can lead to antisocial behavior … but if you combine this adventurousness and curiosity with persistence … then you get the kind of creativity that benefits society as a whole.”  Read more about novelty-seeking in this article by John Tierney in ”The New York Times”, February 13, 2012.

16. The Strange Tale of Phineas Gage

Joanna Schaffhausen describes the fascinating case of Phineas Gage who had a change in personality as a result of a traumatic brain injury.

17. Eight Ways That Money Can Buy Happiness

Eric Barker summarizes the thinking of Daniel Gilbert on what does and does not make us happy in this list of ways that money, contrary to a popular adage, really can buy us happiness, if spent the right way.

18. Want to Be Happier Right Now? The Think Positive! Experiment

Reflecting on the 3 best events over the course of a week, as opposed to the three worst, colors our overall judgement of how the week was.

19. ”I Love Me!”: A Q&A About Narcissism

Psychotherapist Samuel López De Victoria presents this overview of Narcissism to answer people’s most often asked questions. From ”Psych Central” blog, April 18, 2012.

20. Favorite Link Revisited:

Jonathan Mueller at North Central College, in Naperville, Illinois, put together the extensive website (and newsletter!) Resources for Teaching Social Psychology. Check out his resources for teaching the Self as well as other topics related to both personality psychology and social psychology.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 6, February, 2012

February 15, 2012

Hello and welcome to the sixty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,395 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The big news this Valentine’s Day is that the APA filed briefs in the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals and the Montana Supreme Court that support the legal rights of same-sex couples. The brief drew on psychological research suggesting that forming intimate relationships and parenting healthy children is not bounded by sexual orientation.

Does being an introvert stink? This month, the meek shall inherit the earth … or at least four links in this month’s newsletter. Susan Cain’s just-released book ”Quiet: The Power of Introverts” has attracted quite a bit of media attention. In it, she suggests that there are advantages to being an introvert. Also, new research suggests that extroverts may bias self-report studies by their cheerfulness and — in one of those strange-but-true-studies — raters can accurately judge how outgoing or dominant people are from how they smell!

Finally, we discovered a series of articles in ”Psychology Today” which nearly doubles our size of resources on the topic of Narrative Psychology. We are always on the lookout for valuable resources, so if you have one you’d like to see us include, just send us the link!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. APA Files Two Briefs In Support of Same-Sex Couples

According to this press release, ”APA has filed two friend-of-the-court briefs–—one in the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals and one in the Montana Supreme Court–—that support the legal rights of same-sex couples. The cases are significantly different in their arguments before the court, but the briefs rely on the same social science research showing that homosexuality is a normal expression of human sexuality and that same-sex couples are not any less fit or capable than heterosexual parents and that their children are no less adjusted.”

3. Some Personality Traits Affect How You Smell

New research suggests that people can assess how outgoing, anxious, or dominant people are based on their body odor. Read the summary here in ”LiveScience”, December 2, 2011.

4. Are Extroverts Ruining Psychologists’ Surveys?

According to a recent study, ”Extroverts answer survey questions more enthusiastically than do introverts” Is their tendency towards hyperbole getting in the way of scientific objectivity? Do extroverts really experience the world more intensely, or are they just less hesitant to say so? Read all about it in this summary from ”LiveScience,” August 19, 2011.

5. Quiet: The Power of Introverts

Susan Cain, author of ”Quiet: The Power of Introverts” appeared recently on the radio program ”Radio Times” with host Marty Moss-Coane. From the website: ”In a world that celebrates the loudest, most outlandish, extroverted personalities, a new book makes the case for quieter types –– those who shy away from the limelight and who like to spend time alone. Writer Susan Cain says there are advantages to being an introvert, including being a reflective thinker and a good listener. Cain also highlights some well-known introverts like Mother Theresa, Rosa Parks, Joe DiMaggio, Bill Gates and Gandhi, who famously said, ”In a gentle way you can shake the world.” She tells Marty about the science behind introversion and the biases that shy people face.” Runs 49 minutes, 6 seconds, including calls from listeners.

6. Secrets of A Super Successful Introvert: How to (Quietly) Get Your Own Way

Susan Cain, author of ”Quiet: The Power of Introverts” describes her own personal realization of the power of introverts and explains why even social butterflies can benefit from drawing on their soft-spoken side. Includes 6 strategies for ”nourishing the unique strengths that come from your quieter reaches”. From ”O, The Oprah Magazine”, February 2012.

7. Reliability — The Foundation of Any Good Personality Test

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, broadcasts a podcast about psychology called ”The Psych Files”. In this video episode (Episode 168), he describes the concept of reliability in a concrete and enjoyable way through the classic, but invalid, Ice Cream Personality Test, the Distorted Tunes Test of musical perception, and a test of Achievement Motivation (runs 12 minutes, 6 seconds).

8. Validity — How Can You Tell a Good Test From a Bad One?

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, broadcasts a podcast about psychology called ”The Psych Files”. In this video episode (Episode 169), he describes the concept of validity in a concrete and enjoyable way through the classic, but invalid, Ice Cream Personality Test, the Distorted Tunes Test of musical perception, and others. ”High validity is what separates the many fun-to-take but essentially meaningless tests you’ll find on the web, and a truly solid test of your personality” (runs 14 minutes, 40 seconds).

9. Writing and Revising

Looking for a thorough writing guide for you or your students? ”Over the past 20 years of teaching, writing, and editing, I have compiled a set of tips, tricks, and pet peeves that I share with students and colleagues. I’ve decided to make this writing guide more widely available in case others will find it useful. The emphasis is on scientific writing, but the same principles apply to most non-fiction (including journalism).”

10. The Human Brain: Hardwired to Sin

Read about what neuroscientists have discovered about how the brain processes lust, gluttony, sloth, pride, wrath, and greed using brain scanning techniques. From ”Focus Magazine”, February 2012.

11. In Mental Illness, Women Internalize and Men Externalize

According to recent research, ”Women are more likely to develop anxiety and mood disorders such as depression, while men’s mental health issues are more likely to involve antisocial personality and substance abuse disorders.” Read the summary here in ”LiveScience”, August 19, 2011.

12. What Makes You Happy? It May Depend on Your Age

According to recent research, ”People’s happiness levels change with age, an idea reflected in personal experiences and public opinion polls, but a new study shows that much of that change may boil down to how people define happiness itself. Whereas happiness in younger people is often related to excitement, for older people, contentment was associated with a happy existence, the researchers found.” Read all about it in this summary from ”LiveScience,” August 2, 2011.

13. Facebook is Not Such a Good Thing for Those With Low Self-Esteem

”In theory, the social networking website Facebook could be great for people with low self-esteem. Sharing is important for improving friendships. But in practice, people with low self-esteem seem to behave counterproductively, bombarding their friends with negative tidbits about their lives and making themselves less likeable, according to a new study” in ”Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”ScienceDaily,” February 1, 2012.

14. Cloning Fido: Playing ”God” With ”Dog”

This brief episode from the ABC News program ”Night Line” describes how a woman had her beloved pet cloned by a South Korean company. With a high failure rate of clones and the questionable treatment of laboratory animals, the piece raises important questions, including: Do identical genes make for an identical dog? How are surrogate dogs treated after they give birth? Is it ethical to swap one animal’s life for another? Does the high number of failed attempts justify the few successful ones? Originally aired January 6, 2012 (runs 5 minutes, 48 seconds).

15. Powerful People Feel Taller Than They Really Are

According to research by Michelle Duguid and Jack Goncalo published in ”Psychological Science”, December 2011, participants assigned to act as a leader on experimental task increased their self-reported height by about an inch.

16. Self-Portrait in a Skewed Mirror

”You’re more than the star and author of your own life story. You’re also the spin master. How you tell your tale reveals whether you see yourself as victim or victor, even when your story veers from the life you lived”.
By Carlin Flora, for ”Psychology Today” (published on January 01, 2006 – last reviewed on January 18, 2012).

17. Your Life Story in Metaphors

Susan Krauss Whitbourne writes about the metaphors we use to describe our lives: ”Think about how you’ve gotten where you are in life, and where you hope or plan to go. What metaphor comes to mind? Does your life have a shape or a direction? Is it an arrow (upward or downward), a circle, or a series of steps? How about the life of other people you know? Is the metaphor you’d apply to yourself the same as those you’d apply to other people?” in this article from ”Psychology Today”, published May 3, 2011.

18. The Inside Story

”Telling stories is not just the oldest form of entertainment, it’s the highest form of consciousness. The need for narrative is embedded deep in our brains. Increasingly, success in the information age demands that we harness the hidden power of stories. Here’s what you need to know to tell a killer tale” in this story by Peter Guber, for ”Psychology Today”, (published on March 15, 2011 – last reviewed on January 23, 2012).

19. Why We Write

”Psychologists Jerome Bruner and Henri Zukier suggest that our minds have two general ways of taking in the world. When we perceive the world in paradigmatic mode, we act like scientists, connecting facts, looking for patterns and universal principles through which we categorize and understand our environment. The narrative mode on the other hand, is what allows us to endow life with meaning through the stories we tell about it.” Read about the power of writing our own narrative in this article by Mindy Greenstein for ”Psychology Today”, January 12, 2012.

20. A Winning Way to Get Started Writing Your Life Story

Susan Heitler provides this story-starting ideas to help you get in touch with your own life story. From ”Psychology Today”, January 18, 2012.

21. Are You The Star of Your Own Story?

Our lives are works in progress and masterpieces of story telling, so we should embrace our own biographies, according to Kim Schneiderman, in this article for ”Psychology Today”, January 2, 2012.

22. Who’s Writing Your Script? You May Be Surprised

Are you stuck in an ill-fitting role? A poorly written script? Self-reflection and questioning of where our scripts come from can help us to live more in line with our authentic selves according to this article by Kim Schneiderman for ”Psychology Today”, October 17, 2011.

23. Create Real Stories as Believable as Fiction

You can ”write more compelling creative non-fiction using novelist’s tricks” according to this article by Susan K. Perry for ”Psychology Today”, January 15, 2009.

24. Favorite Link Revisited: This Emotional Life

From the website: “The Emmy Award-winning team of Vulcan Productions and the producers of NOVA have created a three-part series that explores improving our social relationships, learning to cope with depression and anxiety, and becoming more positive, resilient individuals. Harvard psychologist and best-selling author of Stumbling on Happiness, Professor Daniel Gilbert, talks with experts about the latest science on what makes us tick and how we can find support for the emotional issues we all face. Each episode weaves together the compelling personal stories of ordinary people and the latest scientific research along with revealing comments from celebrities like Chevy Chase, Larry David, Alanis Morissette, Robert Kennedy, Jr., and Richard Gere. The first episode, Family, Friends & Lovers, looks at the importance of relationships and why they are central to our emotional well-being (includes an excellent overview of Attachment theory). In the second episode, Facing Our Fears, we look at emotions that are commonly regarded as obstacles to happiness — such as anger, fear, anxiety, and despair (includes a discussion of Anger, Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Stress and Anxiety). The last episode, Rethinking Happiness, explores happiness. It is so critical to our well-being, and, yet, it remains such an elusive goal for many of us” (includes Creativity and Flow, Forgiveness, Happiness, Humor, Meditation, Resilience). See more about the people and stories featured on the series, view selected video clips, learn more about the topics mentioned, find information about resources and support organizations, and purchase a DVD.