Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 6, February, 2011

February 8, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,192 other interesting links related to personality, please visit us.

Snow, sleet, freezing rain, ice, deadlines, classes, and exams . . . If you’re feeling a bit anxious these days, you’re in good company. One psychologist claims ”The average High School kid today has same level of anxiety as the average psychiatric patient in the early 1950s”. Have Americans become more anxious? Check out our second link below to see this provocative article that is sure to spark discussion among your students (and colleagues around the water cooler). Then follow the third link for a possible ”cure”.

We also continue our new feature: Favorite Links Revisited. In this feature we’ll be calling your attention to some of our favorite links from Personality Pedagogy that are worthy of a second look. Have you ever heard Freud’s voice? This month, we feature two links to the same (redundancy is good) 2-minute audio clip from the BBC recording of Freud describing psychoanalysis in his own words.

Though the groundhog promises a quick end to the winter, we promise interesting links to keep you and your students up-to-date and entertained until the spring comes.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. It’s Not The Job Market

Is it true that ”The average High School kid today has same level of anxiety as the average psychiatric patient in the early 1950s”? Have Americans become more anxious? Slate writer Taylor Clark considers the three real reasons why Americans are more anxious than ever before: loss of a sense of community, information overload, and misplaced faith in ”feel-goodism”. Posted January 31, 2011.

3. Mindfulness Meditation Training Changes Brain Structure in Eight Weeks

”Participating in an 8-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and stress” according to a study in the January 30 issue of ”Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, January 21, 2011.

4. Amygdala Volume and Social Network Size in Humans
Summarizes recent research which found that the size of the amygdala is correlated with the size and complexity of social networks (like Facebook). Find a blog post that discusses the findings and possible alternative explanations here.

5. The Brain: Understanding Neurobiology
The early modules of this program ”The Brain: Understanding Neurobiology Through the Study of Addiction—developed with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)” provide a good, interactive overview of parts of the brain, brain functioning, and biochemistry, suitable for a personality class. For example, ”Lesson 1: The Brain: What’s Going On in There” includes a brief video describing what a PET scan is and how it’s done.

6. Born Gay, Born This Way: A Photo Blog

A photo essay from NPR about the ”Born This Way” blog (see below). From February 2, 2011.

7. Born This Way
This blog is a ”photo/essay project for gay adults (male and female) to submit pictures from their childhood (roughly ages 2 to 12) – with snapshots that capture them, innocently, showing the beginnings of their innate LGBT selves.” According to the blog’s editor, ”So, some of the pix here feature gay boys with feminine traits, and some gay girls with masculine traits. And even more gay kids with NONE of those traits. Just like real life, these gay kids come in all shades and layers of masculine and feminine. And this project is not about furthering stereotypes.” The result is often charming, thoughtful, and very real.

8. Activity: The Complexity of Sexual Orientation
The Understanding Prejudice website has a special section on college classroom activities. In this activity, students fill out a Sexual Orientation Identification sheet (on the website) which describes the behaviors and attractions of various hypothetical people. Students must decide if the person described is lesbian, gay, bisexual, or straight. The items are designed to provoke differences of opinion to spark a discussion as to what defines sexual orientation: behavior, desire, self-identification, or some combination of all three. Includes discussion questions.

9. Where women of India rule the roost and men demand gender equality: The Khasi people of north-eastern India are a matrilineal society and some men aren’t happy
In this ethnic minority community in a remote part of India, children take their mother’s surname, the youngest daughter inherits, and once married, men live in their mother-in-law’s home following her orders. Read about this matrilineal system, how anthropologists believe it started, and the freedoms women here have compared to their sisters elsewhere in India.

10. Men Are Now From Venus, Women From Mars
According to a new survey finds that single men want babies and commitment and women want independence in their relationships. What people are looking for in love relationships, the percent of people who want to may, and where people look for love has changed over time as well. Read about the findings in this article in ”LiveScience”, February 4, 2011.

11. The Social Web’s Big New Theme for 2011: Multiple Identities for Everyone!
With the many tools and contexts available now on line for people to define and express themselves there is an increase in the number of users who construct multiple online presences. Pundits predict that this ”splintered approach” is likely to increase. What this means for identity, friendships, and social identity is up for debate.

12. Other People May Experience More Misery Than You Realise
Summarizes research which suggests that we underestimate other people’s experience of negative emotions and put on an unrealistically happy front because we think that’s the norm. ”British Psychological Society Research Digest”, January 24, 2011. Jordan, A., Monin, B., Dweck, C., Lovett, B., John, O., and Gross, J. (2010). Misery Has More Company Than People Think: Underestimating the Prevalence of Others’ Negative Emotions. ”Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 37 (1)”, 120-135.

13. Brooke Greenberg: The Girl who Doesn’t Age.
Brooke Greenberg is 17 years old but at 16 pounds and 30 inches she looks more like an infant. Scientists are trying to understand this “Syndrome X” which afflicts Brooke and only 3 other people in the entire world. Though it appears that her “Syndrome X” was coded (or mis-coded) in her genes, genetic testing revealed that her genes are perfectly normal. Scientists are stumped. Could the key to Brooke’s syndrome be at the level of introns, parts of genes that regulate other genes (exons) rather than code directly for characteristics? New research in this field of epigenetics, which studies changes in phenotype (genetic expression) by process other than changes in the genetic sequence, may explain this condition.

14. Double Visionary
Describes the research of Nancy Segal on the personality of twins. Segal’s work suggests that ”genes predispose individuals to seek certain environments and experiences during development . . . [much like] a faithful squire, leading us toward people, places, and events that bring us pleasure and away from those that don’t.”

15. Being Poor Can Suppress Children’s Genetic Potential
”Our findings suggest that socioeconomic disparities in cognitive development start early . . . For children from poorer homes, genetic influences on changes in cognitive ability were close to zero. For children from wealthier homes, genes accounted for about half of the variation in cognitive changes.” According to this 2003 article from ”Psychological Science,” Volume 14(6), 623-628, by Eric Turkheimer, Andreana Haley, Mary Waldron, Brian D’Onofrio,and Irving I. Gottesman and summarized here.

16. Depression Linked To Your Genetic Double Helix DNA
Summarizes the results of a meta-analysis which supports earlier findings that ”there is a link between sensitivity to stress and a short allele in those who had been mistreated as children and in people suffering with specific, severe medical conditions. Only a marginal relationship was found in those who had undergone stressful life events [without the short allele]. ” Karg, K., Burmeister, M., Shedden, K., Sen, S. (2011). The Serotonin Transporter Promoter Variant (5-HTTLPR), Stress, and Depression Meta-analysis Revisited Evidence of Genetic Moderation. ”Archives of General Psychiatry. Published online January 3, 2011.

17. Mortal Magnates: Research shows entrepreneurs are pretty much like the rest of us
Despite McClelland’s classic (1961) research which identified a entrepreneurial personality, psychologists have not been able to agree on what an entrepreneur is, much less how to measure his or her personality. Kelly Shaver, leading a team of researchers including sociologists, management theorists, economists, finance professors, and psychologists, new research is discovering that entrepreneurs are not so different from others, except for a greater belief that they will succeed. Read about their research here, in the article from the February 2011, APS ”Observer”.

18. A Fate That Narcissists Will Hate: Being Ignored
”Narcissists, much to the surprise of many experts, are in the process of becoming an endangered species . . . The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (due out in 2013, and known as DSM-5) has eliminated five of the 10 personality disorders that are listed in the current edition. Narcissistic personality disorder is the most well-known of the five, and its absence has caused the most stir in professional circles.” Read all about the controversy in this article by Charles Zanor in ”The New York Times”, November 29, 2010.

19. Reflecting on Narcissism
On the one hand, ”You can look at individual scores of narcissism, you can look at data on lifetime prevalence of Narcissistic Personality Disorder, you can look at related cultural trends, and they all point to one thing . . . Narcissism is on the rise.” On the other, ”Kids today are remarkably similar to previous generations, at least in terms of their traits and behaviors.” Read about what current research has to say about narcissism and American culture today.

20. A Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice
Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: ”I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Freud.” Find a second link here. (2 minutes)

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 2, October, 2010

October 31, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 2, October, 2010

Hello and welcome to the fiftieth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,136 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The big news for this month is that we’ve added a new feature to the newsletter: Favorite Links from Personality Pedagogy. In this feature we’ll be calling your attention to some of our favorite links from the site that are worthy of a second look. There is so much on Personality Pedagogy that we wouldn’t want you to overlook anything!

Given that today is Halloween we wish you many treats and no tricks in your pursuit of teaching materials for personality psychology!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Resilience: The Nick Vujicic Story

Nick Vujicic was born in 1982 without arms or legs but with the strength of character and spirit to overcome these challenges: ”By the age of 19 Nick started to fulfill his dream of being able to encourage other people and bring them hope, through motivational speaking and telling his story. [Nick] found the purpose of [his] existence, and also the purpose of [his] circumstance. Nick wholeheartedly believes that there is a purpose in each of the struggles we encounter in our lives and that our attitude towards those struggles that can be the single most effective factor in overcoming them.” Click here for a 4-minute and 11-second film about him featuring excerpts from some of his talks to young people.

3. How to Study Like A Pro: 9 Evidence-Based Study Strategies

The editor of the ”Research Digest,” published by the British Psychological Society, compiled these 9 strategies for a special issue for students. Each of the tips are described and include a link to a summary of the published research which supports the usefulness of the strategy. Strategies include: adopt a growth mindset, sleep well, pace your studies, test yourself, and more.

4. Study Confirms: Whatever Doesn’t Kill Us Can Make Us Stronger

”A new national multi-year longitudinal study of the effects of adverse life events on mental health has found that adverse experiences do, in fact, appear to foster subsequent adaptability and resilience, with resulting advantages for mental health and well being” According to a study by Mark Seery, Alison Holman, and Roxane Silver in this 2010 article from the ”Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” and summarized by Science Daily, October 15, 2010.

5. Culture Wires the Brain

According to research by Denise Park and colleagues from ”Perspectives on Psychological Science,” ”Where you grow up can have a big impact on the food you eat, the clothes you wear, and even how your brain works […] There is evidence that the collectivist nature of East Asian cultures versus individualistic Western cultures affects both brain and behavior.” according to this summary from ”Science Daily”, August 3, 2010.

6. A Revised Coding System for Need for Achievement

From the site: ”Recently, Blankenship et al. (2003) developed 10 new pictures for eliciting achievement imagery and, in the process, revised the coding system for nAch, first developed by McClelland, Atkinson, Lowell, and Clark in 1953. In this manual we [Blankenship et al.] describe the revised method for scoring nAch from stories written to new PSE pictures and provide examples and practice materials for researcher assistants to learn the revised method.” Includes references and links to examples of nAch categories and subcategories including Standard of Excellence, Unique Accomplishment, Long Term Involvement, Positive Anticipatory Goal State, Negative Anticipatory Goal State, Blocks to Achievement and others.

7. Revenge of the Introvert

Provides a good overview of what it’s like to be an introvert in a fast-paced individualistic culture where talking, networking, and self-promotion is expected. Life is just different for introverts, and this essay explains some of the differences between introverts and extroverts, especially when it comes to the pursuit of happiness. Includes a list of what not to say to an introvert. Written by staff writer Laurie Helgoe, published on September 01, 2010.

8. Gay Sex vs. Straight Sex

The dating site OKCupid collects background research on its over 3.2 million gay and straight users. Using charts and numbers, Christian Rudder used the data to test common misconceptions about gays and lesbians, including gay promiscuity, homophobic thinking, and sexual desire. He went even further and identified personality and interest differences between gay and straight men and lesbian and straight women who used the site. The charts are interactive, so you can click to see the answers of different groups (e.g., men, women, straight, gay/lesbian). Lots of findings here sure to spark discussion in your class.

9. Cross-Dressing Girls in Afghanistan: Social Rules and Accommodations

The website Sociological Images presents this discussion about how in Afghanistan some families without sons pick a girl-child in the family to dress, act, and pass as a boy. These biological girls cross-dress as social boys to obtain more male privileges. This gives all of the children in the family extra privileges such as the freedom to leave the house, attend school, and even work outside the home. ”By dressing her a boy, however, they are effectively nodding to the rules, even as they break them… And, because other Afghanis understand, they are willing to look the other way.’

10. A Neuroscientist Uncovers a Dark Secret

Neuroscientist James Fallon, upon learning that he came from a lineage of violent people, compared the brain scans of his family and was disturbed to realize that his brain resembled the brain of a psychopath. In this story by Barbara Bradley Hagerty from NPR’s ”Morning Edition” from June 29 2010, Fallon reflects upon the science of genetics, neuroscience, and the role of nurture in making us who we are. First of the three-part series ”Inside the Criminal Brain” this link is to the text version of the story. Links to the other parts are listed below. Links are also available to audios of the original broadcasts, each about 8 minutes long.

See also:
Part 2: Inside a Psychopath’s Brain: The Sentencing Debate

Part 3: Can Your Genes Make You Murder?

11. The Barnum Effect

Pierre Ysewijn created this on-line personality ”test” which gives false feedback. Despite the obviously invalid questions people still rate the feedback as accurate, illustrating the Barnum Effect.

12. The Barnum Effect – A Favorite Link Revisited

The first link is to an online test of 47 questions plus some background demographics which give the appearance of a legitimate personality test. Respondents receive the typical Barnum feedback and rate how accurate it is. The beauty of this on-line version is that students can change some of their answers and see that their description never changes. In the words of Prof. Birnbaum at Fullerton State who developed this page, ”Self-validation is no validation” according to the explanation given here.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 3, November, 2009

November 25, 2009

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 3, November, 2009

Hello and welcome to the thirty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

What’s new this month? Lots!!

Did you know that elders who go online show increased brain function and less depression than elders who do not use the internet to learn about new things, reminisce, play games, and connect with family and friends? You can read the whole article here: http://tinyurl.com/yh7pgo2

Are your students looking for a study abroad internship experience in psychology? AIDE, a not-for-profit organization which provides international internships and volunteer experiences, is offering a special 2-for-1 discount on deposits until November 30. Check it out: http://www.aideabroad.org/index.asp

Do you teach other classes in psychology? The Society for the Teaching of Psychology, Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, just debuted a wiki for the Teaching of Psychology (http://teachpsych.pbworks.com/). Here’s your chance to jump in to the wonderful world of wikis!

Are you familiar with Discovery Education? A division of Discovery Communications, i.e., they of the TV and magazine, designed a series of lesson plans for the k-12 classroom (but which can be easily beefed up for an intro-level college course). Though they seem to have many topics except for psychology (language arts, history, astronomy, ecology, economics, fine arts, biology, literature, mathematics and more) we found some gems for genetics, evolution and even Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams hidden in these pages. Check them out via the links below.

Do you own the ill-fated 6th edition of the APA manual? We have word from Ted Bosack (via the PsychTeacher listserv) about the APA Manual exchange program:

”The leadership of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (APA, Division 2) wants to be sure that as many of its members as possible are aware of APA’s decision to replace copies of the recently published Publication Manual revision that contained a number of errors and inconsistencies. APA will replace these purchased manuals with corrected copies. However, there are a number of requirements that must be met prior to a December 15, 2009, deadline if purchasers are to receive a replacement copy. These requirements are as follows:

APA has agreed to replace copies of the Publication Manual (1st printing). If
you wish to take advantage of this opportunity, you must follow these steps:
* Call 1-800-374-2721, ext. 5510 between 9:00 and 6:00 EST.
* State your desire to exchange your manual for a new printing and be
prepared to answer some questions.
* You will get an e-mail with an instruction sheet and pre-paid mailing label to
send your old manual back.
* REMEMBER, THE DEADLINE IS DECEMBER 15!!

These requirements are also detailed on the STP Web site at
http://teachpsych.org/news/news.php

Of course, if you’re fed up with the manual and the entire brouhaha, then check out the first link to a free, online, APA style sheet for the current (2009) style guidelines.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or you can even re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our new blog: https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ You can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (“Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted.

I, personally, am very thankful for the community of teachers which have helped me with my teaching throughout the years and especially to the readers and subscribers who support Personality Pedagogy. We wish a bountiful and restful Thanksgiving holiday to you all!!

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. Free APA Style Sheet

From the website: ”APA Lite for College Papers” is a concise guide to crafting research papers in the style of the American Psychological Association (APA). It is based on the current edition of the APA Publication Manual (2009) while incorporating guidelines for ”Material Other Than Journal Articles” found in the last edition. Specifically covers writing scientific papers at the undergraduate level.

2. OTRP Teaching of Psychology Wiki

The Society for the Teaching of Psychology, Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, just debuted this wiki. Wiki-Master Sue Frantz, Highline Community College, Des Moines, WA, explains: ”This brand new resource is completely dependent on you to build it. In the spirit of reciprocity, we ask that if you take something, you leave something. To be able to write to this wiki, you will need to request access from the Wiki-Master.”

3. Statistics Glossary

The STEPS (STatistical Education through Problem Solving) consortium has developed problem-based modules to support the teaching of Statistics in various fields including Psychology. As part of their online support, Valerie J. Easton and John H. McColl maintain this statistics glossary for all of the terms covered in a basic course. The glossary is arranged alphabetically or organized around key topics including presenting data, sampling, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, categorical data, nonparametric methods, time series data, design of experiments, ANOVA, paired data, correlation, regression, and random variables and probability distributions

4. Psychobiography

This website, maintained by William Todd Schultz, Pacific University Oregon, describes psychobiography (the application of psychological theory and research to individual lives of historical importance), the influential people in the field, an annotated bibliography and lots more.

5. Nova: Stem Cell Breakthrough

Three separate teams overcome a biomedical hurdle—creating stem cells without the use of human embryos. Learn about their research here and much more about stem cells including related science news, links and books, transcript, and a teacher’s guide The program, 13 minutes and 39 seconds long, originally aired on PBS July 23, 2008 and is available in closed captioning. Click through to the teacher’s guide for a shortened version 5 minutes and 16 seconds long.

6. A Dream Interpretation: Tuneups for the Brain

A new theory suggests that dreams are a warm-up for the day ahead. In a paper published last month in the journal ”Nature Reviews Neuroscience”, Dr. J. Allan Hobson, a psychiatrist and longtime sleep researcher at Harvard, argues that the main function of rapid-eye-movement sleep, or REM, when most dreaming occurs, is physiological. Read all about his research in this ”New York Times” article by Benedict Carey, from November 10, 2009. (Remember that access to the New York Times is free, but you may need to sign up for a free account).

7. Henry Murray: 20 Needs

Summarizes Henry Murray’s theory of needs and describes the original 20 needs he wrote about including nAchievement, nPower, and nAffiliation.

8. Otto Rank (1914). The Myth of the Birth of the Hero. New York: Vintage.
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/mbh/index.htm

The full-text version of his book is available from this website: ”In this study Rank looks at a a wide variety of Eurasian hero birth narratives, including Greek, Roman, Judeo-Christian, Indian, and Germanic legendary figures. He uses the methodology and vocabulary of classic Freudian psychoanalysis to do so. The middle part of this book, where Rank enumerates some of these tales, will be the most useful for modern readers, as he draws on a wide range of sources, some of them fairly obscure. In the last part he puts these myths ‘on the couch’ as it were, and ties up his thesis very coherently.”

9. Dr. Matthew Fox: The Stanford Lectures: An Immersion in Creation Spirituality
What is the Creation Spirituality lineage and Why does it strike fear in the hearts of Inquisitors and Fundamentalists? What does it mean to be Spiritual and adult in the 21st century? What is the future of spirituality, religion and interfaith in our time? Fox answers these questions is a series of videos, using the theories of Otto Rank, ”the youngest and the most brilliant” of Freud’s students:

a) Otto Rank Overview of his theory (9 minutes, 57 seconds)

b) Otto Rank on Art (6 minutes, 50 seconds)

10. Genetic Screening: Ethical issues

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics, London, prepared this report to encourage debate about the ethical issues raised by research on genes associated with psychological and behavioral traits. Read their report, reviews of the evidence, and other materials here.

11. An interview with Dr. Klaus-Peter Lesch

From the website: ”In-cites talks with Dr. Klaus-Peter Lesch about his paper, “Association of anxiety-related traits with a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene regulatory region,” (Science 274[5292]: 1527-31, 29 November 1996), as well as his related research. This paper has been named a Highly Cited Paper in the field of Neuroscience & Behavior by  Essential Science Indicators, and currently has a total of 1,160 citations to its credit.” Includes a summary of the paper and a description of his current work.

12. Human Genome Project
http://genomics.energy.gov/
http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresources/Human_Genome/education/education.shtml

Find information about the Human Genome Project including project facts; educational materials; medicine and the new genetics; and ethical, legal and social issues. The second link brings you to resources for teachers.

13. Lesson Plan: Evolution

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on Evolution, students will: demonstrate an understanding of the theory of evolution, study how the theory of evolution has been received by society over time and consider why it has been so controversial and compare the theory of evolution to other ideas about how different life forms emerged and assess which ideas should be taught in science class.

14. Lesson Plan: The Interpretation of Dreams

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams, students will understand that Freud argued that our dreams contain clues to our hopes, fears, and fantasies and that Freud claimed that developments in our childhood affect the way we act and the kinds of dreams we have.

15. Lesson Plan: Genetics

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on Genetics, student will: Describe the technologies make that make genetic manipulation possible, identify situations in which genetic manipulation could solve a problem and debate the positive or negative arguments of the ethical issues surrounding the use of genetic manipulation.

16. Lesson Plan: Understanding the Power of Genes

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on genetics students will discuss new scientific information about genes; consider how that information is changing thoughts about human behavior and scientific research; and write essays about how information about genetics affects private homes, the research laboratory, and hospitals and clinics.

17. Lesson Plan: Genetic Engineering

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on genetics students will: discover ethical issues surrounding the practice of genetic engineering in reproductive medicine; and understand key terms and concepts related to the science of genetic engineering.

18. Lesson Plan: Nature versus Nurture

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson, students will learn that environment can influence some personality traits, while others are genetic; understand that the most effective way to study the concept of nature versus nurture is by conducting research with identical and fraternal twins reared separately and together; and discover that the issues of nature versus nurture are still debated in the scientific community.