Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 4, December 2015

December 17, 2015

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Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,256  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Just a quick update with some links for this month. We know that some of you are finishing up a semester while others are planning the semester ahead, while others are just carrying on in the New Year!

To all of you, we wish you a peaceful holiday season and all the best in 2016!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Just two questions predict how well a pilot will handle an emergency
“A new study reports that, more than relevant facts such as age and years of experience, pilots’ answers to two simple questions can more accurately forecast how they will respond to a stressful situation.” These questions help to determine whether the pilot views the situation as a challenge or as a threat. Published in “Anxiety, Stress, & Coping” and summarized here for BPS Research Digest, July 7, 2015.

3. Your personality can invite loneliness, and loneliness can shape your personality
According to new research, “it appears our personality affects the likelihood that we’ll become more lonely (and feel less well) as we get older, but also that being lonely (and feeling less healthy) shapes our personality, potentially setting up a vicious circle of isolation”. Published in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for BPS Research Digest, July 21, 2015.

4. Is Your Brain Male or Female?
Writer Veronica Pamoukaghlian reviews neuroscience investigating possible gender differences in brain form and function. Posted June 6, 2015.

5. Why You Should Be True to Yourself
New research by Maryam Kouchaki and her colleagues finds that feeling inauthentic is related to what it means to be a moral person. Published in Psychological Science and summarized here for PsyBlog, June 11, 2015.

6. How To Be Content When Your Life Feels Out of Control
According to new research “In the survey of over 500 people, the researchers found that both primary and secondary control were linked to positive emotions. Only primary control, though, was linked to negative emotions.” Published in “Social Psychological and Personality Science” and summarized here for PsyBlog,June 8, 2015.

7. This personality trait may get you hired — but it won’t necessarily get you promoted
While agreeable people are well-liked by their colleagues and being cooperative, flexible, tolerant, and forgiving can help you land a job, this trait may not help one advance their career. From “Business Insider”, June 4, 2015.

8. Favorite Link Revisited: Chimpanzees’ Personas Seem More Complex Than People’s
Using the same techniques as the early (human) trait theorists did, Hani Freeman and her colleagues found evidence that chimpanzee personality consists of 6 dimensions. These include extroversion, agreeableness and openness, shared by humans, but also reactivity (related to the human trait of neuroticism, perhaps?), dominance and methodicalness which are not. Their research was published in the American Journal of Primatology and summarized here in The Economist, June 15, 2013.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 12, August 2014

August 18, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,046 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month would be a good time to get moving on your upcoming fall classes. But if you are still in summer mode, then check out our links on procrastination below.

If, however, you are looking for inspiration for your classes including activities, textbooks, syllabi, and even ideas for first-day-of-class ice breakers, then check out The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, our featured Favorite Link Revisited this month brought to you by The Society for the Teaching of Psychology.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2.Getting Over Procrastination

Piers Steel, a researcher whose specialty is procrastination, explains how procrastination has been a problem since recorded time leading to lessened well-being, worse health, and lower salaries. So, why do we do it and how can we stop it? Steel shares some of his research findings in this piece by Maria Konnikova for “The New Yorker”, July 22, 2014.

3. Procrastination and Science

What do the Dalai Lama, Victor Hugo, St. Augstine and Margaret Atwood have in common? They are all procrastinators according to researchers Piers Steel, Rosa Hendijani and Chris Morin of the University of Calgary. They put together this web page to study procrastination and to link it to other aspects of personality. Includes links to the downside and the upside of procrastination, famous procrastinators, quotes about procrastination, personality tests, online polls, strategies to counter procrastination, and a summary of their latest research. Posted August 2014.

4. Procrastination Survey

You can sign up here to take the procrastination survey of researchers Piers Steel, Rosa Hendijani and Chris Morin of the University of Calgary and to participate in their ongoing research on procrastination.

5. Sometimes Early Birds Are Too Early

From the article: “Since the advent of the deadline, procrastinators have suffered society’s barbs for putting off until later what needs doing now. But it turns out that many people appear to be finishing things sooner than they need to get them done. They are “precrastinators,” researchers say. “ From “The New York Times”, July 19, 2014.

6. How Your “Locus of Control” Drives Your Success (and Stress)

Though generally people with an internal locus of control fare better in life, an extreme internal orientation can become a problem unless it is tempered by competence, self-efficacy, and opportunity or else people may become neurotic, anxious, and depressed. From “Business Insider”, July 30, 2014.

7. Mathematical Equation to Predict Happiness: Doesn’t Depend on How Well Things Go, But on Whether Things are Better Than Expected

“The happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide has been predicted by an equation developed by researchers at [University College, London], with results showing that moment-to-moment happiness reflects not just how well things are going, but whether things are going better.” From “ScienceDaily”, August 4, 2014.

8. Study Reveals “Unhappiest” Cities in the U.S.

“New research identifies the unhappiest cities in the U.S., but finds that some young people are still willing to relocate to them for a good job opportunity or lower housing prices. The analysis suggests people may be deciding to trade happiness for other gains.” From “ScienceDaily”, July 22, 2014.

9. How Much Does Happiness Cost in Your State?

According to ABC News “In a popular study by psychologist Daniel Kahneman and economist Angus Deaton, it was determined that the “magic income” is $75,000 a year. According to the study, as people earn more money, their day-to-day happiness (or “Emotional Well-Being”) rises.” They put together a map estimating how much it takes in each state to reach this idea level of income. In some states like Utah and Mississippi, it takes less, while in others, New York, Connecticut, and Hawaii, it takes much more. July 18, 2014.

10. How 14 Things That Happened To You In Childhood Shape You As An Adult

From attachment with caretakers to making one’s own decisions, to being spanked as a kid, there is evidence that these experiences from one’s childhood can affect personality in adulthood. From “Business Insider”, July 28, 2014.

11. Why Was Darth Vader So Evil? Blame His Lack of Parental Care, Say Psychologists

“Why was Darth Vader such a bad dude? According to a team of psychologists led by Peter Jonason, it’s down to his lack of parental care: the fact he was separated from his mother at age 9, and his father’s absence. The researchers believe such circumstances can catalyze the emergence of the Dark Triad of personality traits: Machiavellianism, Narcissism and Psychopathy. These traits are usually seen as negative, but Jonason and his colleagues believe they may be an adaptive response to tough early circumstances that signal to a child “life is bad”.” From “BPS Research Digest”, August 5, 2014.

12. How to Manage Both Extroverts and Introverts

Introverts and extroverts both bring assets to the workplace. Understanding what they are and how to manage them can help managers run a more productive and happy workplace. From “Business Insider”, July 10, 2014.

13. This Personality Trait Is The Most Important Driver Of Creative Achievement

According to research, the factor of Openness and its four constituent factors of explicit cognitive ability, intellectual engagement, affective engagement, and aesthetic engagement are related to creative work. From “Business Insider”, July 7, 2014.

14. One Simple Question Can Determine if You’re A Narcissist

According to Brad Bushman, “Narcissists aren’t afraid to tell you they’re narcissists” in this summary of his research here in “Business Insider”, August 6, 2014.

15. If Freud Worked Tech Support

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, produces a podcast about psychology called “The Psych Files”. In this episode (Episode 224) he presents a ”humorous way to learn about the Freudian defense mechanisms (actually elaborated by Anna Freud) of Displacement, Denial, Sublimation, Reaction Formation, and Projection. A little dream analysis thrown in. Who knows? Maybe Freud would have been good at tech support” (runs 4 minutes, and 8 seconds).

16. Favorite Link Revisited: The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) develops and distributes teaching and advising materials and provides services to teachers of psychology at all levels on behalf of The Society for the Teaching of Psychology. Look here for everything from copies of syllabi, how to write letters of recommendation, how to host an undergraduate research conference, to ethical issues and ice breakers with everything else in between.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 2, October, 2013

October 30, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,887 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Just in time for Halloween, we present a newsletter full of tricks and treats. First, the trick: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Monster Needs (see link below). You may be as amazed as we were to discover that zombies, vampires, ghosts, and werewolves can all achieve self-actualization. Of course, like most jokes of this type, the more you know about the actual theory, the funnier the jokes seem. Brought to you by the Canadian English language TV comedy channel BiteTV. Also in keeping with the season, see our special ‘’Favorite Link Revisited’’ for how to incorporate the characters of ‘’Twilight’’ as case studies for various theorists including Maslow, Horney, Erikson and others.

For more tricks, Lego this month released new play figures, one of which is a woman scientist. But we couldn’t get all that excited about the stereotype-busting brainiac, because they also released ‘’Diner Waitress’’, ‘’Dirndl Girl’’, ‘’Grandma’’, and ‘’Lady Robot’’. Decked out in pink accessories and rosy cheeks, the Lady Robot claims to ‘’party like nobody else’’ according to the press release issued by Lego. You win some and you lose some we guess!

Finally, the treat. If you’ve ever wondered if you are living in the right place, check out the latest research by Peter Rentfrow and colleagues and the geographical ‘’Mood Map’’ created from their work below. According to the quiz (with dubious validity) it says that I should be in South Carolina or Georgia. Hmm, with the temperatures we’ve been having in Philly this week, that doesn’t sound like a bad idea.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Monster Needs

According to the Canadian English language TV comedy channel BiteTV, zombies, vampires, ghosts, and werewolves all have their belongingness and self-esteem needs and can achieve self-actualization.

3. Video Clips of Elements of Master Teaching

(2013) by Jeffrey R. Stowell (Eastern Illinois University) and R. Eric Landrum (Boise State University) is ”composed of 73 short YouTube videos of college teachers displaying qualities associated with elements of master teaching. Information about each clip is contained in a table that lists the clip length, course discipline, course level, and specific teacher behaviors demonstrated. Viewers can use YouTube’s built-in functions to submit comments and provide like/dislike ratings. The videos could be incorporated into teaching seminars, graduate student training, faculty development efforts, and research studies on the impact of viewing elements of master teaching behaviors. It is accessible from the general page (here) under the category title ”Faculty Development” or directly at link above.

4. Two Guys On Your Head: Locus of Control

”Two Guys on Your Head” is a short feature, produced at KUT Radio, that explores topics associated with the brain. In this episode, University of Texas Professors Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke explain what locus of control is and review the evidence which suggests that though people differ in their view of reality believing that they have control over their outcomes or not, we can change our perceptions to cope better — even giving up control as circumstances warrant. (Audio; runs 8 minutes).

5. How Dare You Say Narcissism Is Increasing?

To satisfy the critics — and the curious — Jean Twenge provides the psychological evidence behind her ”New York Times” article (available here) claiming that today’s young people are more narcissistic than previous generations. From ”Psychology Today”, August 12, 2013.

6. Self-Control and Stress

Art Markman explains the marshmallow test and research on delay of gratification and how it predicts positive outcomes and a better ability to deal with stress. From ”Psychology Today”, July 16, 2013.

7. Losing is Good for You

Ashley Marryman summarizes the research on praise and rewards and suggests that the best thing we can give kids is the opportunity to fail . . . and to learn from that failure. From ”The New York Times”, September 24, 2013.

8. 23andMe’s Designer Baby Patent

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office award a patent on ”gamete donor selection” to the company ”23andMe” that sells at-home DNA testing kits. This technology would ”enable prospective parents to handpick a sperm or egg donor with whom they would likely to produce a child born with certain traits that they desire”. Whether this information is empowering to potential parents or a modern twist on eugenics is something you and your students can debate. From ”The Huffington Post”, October 4, 2013.

9. Lego Unveils First Female Lego Scientist

The toy company Lego just announced a new line of miniature figures including, for the first time, a woman in a non-traditional career. The scientist Professor C. Bodin comes complete with two Erlenmeyer flasks. The hope is that by providing a character girls can relate to, young girls can more easily imagine themselves as succeeding in the sciences. From ”ABC News”, September 4, 2013.

10. Scientists Discover One of the Greatest Contributing Factors to Happiness — You’ll Thank Me Later

What happens when people write a gratitude letter to a special person in their lives and then call that person and read their letter out lout to them? The result is happiness, according to psychological research demonstrated by this feel-good video. Runs 7 minutes 14 seconds.

11. CBT Relapse Prevention

”In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes examples of the application of techniques such as mindfulness, acceptance, and validation. He also explains how these and other important techniques can be used to enhance relapse prevention.” Posted by the Beck Institute, October 9, 2013. Runs 4 minutes, 59 seconds

12. Proposed Treatment To Fix Genetic Diseases Raises Ethical Issues

NPR’s ”Morning Edition” reports that ”The federal government is considering whether to allow scientists to take a controversial step: make changes in some of the genetic material in a woman’s egg that would be passed down through generations.” From October 9, 2013. Listen to the full story and read the transcript here. Runs 5 minutes and 40 seconds.

13. Helen Neville on Experiential, Genetic and Epigenetic Effects on Human Neurocognitive Development

”Recent advances in neuroscience have effectively put an end to the “nature or nurture” debate. Instead, the focus of discussion has switched to mechanisms and brain-based interventions — in what ways are neural circuits changed by experience? When is the brain most receptive to education and learning? And what effects does high versus low socioeconomic status (SES) have on the development of neurocognition?” Helen Neville addresses these questions in her 2013 APS William James Fellow Award Address. Rums 50 minutes and 13 seconds.

14. Changing Brains

Helen Neville and her colleagues at the University of Oregon Brain Development Lab created this 12-part program to help parents, educators, policy-makers, and care-givers of young children understand how and when experience shapes the development of the human brain. Separate segments focus on vision, hearing, motor skills, attention, language, reading, math, music, and emotions and learning.

15. Can cognitive behavioural therapy really change our brains?

From the website: ”Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a type of talking therapy that’s used to treat a wide range of mental health problems, from depression and eating disorders to phobias and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It recommends looking at ourselves in a different way that might prove useful for all of us in everyday life. But what happens to our brains when we have CBT?” From BBC Science, August 6, 2013.

16. U.S. regions exhibit distinct personalities, research reveals

”Americans with similar temperaments are so likely to live in the same areas that a map of the country can be divided into regions with distinct personalities”, according to new research by Peter Rentfrow and colleagues summarized here in ”Science Daily”, October 17, 2013.

17. America’s Mood Map: An Interactive Guide to the United States of Attitude

”Using personality test data from over one million people, researchers have identified three distinct personality regions in the country. Here, each state is colored by the region it belongs to and shaded according to how strongly its personality matches that profile.” Features a map of the United States identifying which states are ”Friendly and Conventional”, ”Relaxed and Creative”, and ”Temperamental and Uninhibited” along with 10-item survey which lets visitors discover which state most closely matches their personality. From ”Time Magazine”, October 22, 2013.

18. How to Find the Best Workout for Your Personality

By taking account of a person’s BAS and BIS or traits like introversion, extroversion, and neuroticism, people can find a workout which best matches their personality leading to long term habits of exercise. Or, in the words of one of the researchers, ”Physical activity is just another expression of our personal preferences and style”.

19. Favorite Link Revisited: Twilight Deconstructed

Drawing on classic theorists including Carl Jung, Karen Horney, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers and others, Donna Ashcraft takes a psychological and feminist approach to understanding the ‘’Twilight’’ characters in her book ‘’Deconstructing Twilight: Psychological and Feminist Perspectives on the Series’’. Thanks to her publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., you can read and download a PDF of Chapter 7 in which she uses Karen Horney’s 10 neurotic needs to understand the dynamics between Bella and her parents, Bella and Edward and more. (opens in PDF format)


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 12, August, 2011

August 31, 2011

Hello and welcome to the sixtieth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,282 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are pleased to bring you an eclectic collection of links from sexism and heterosexism to your brain and your awkward friends. Many of the links below are to summaries of the latest research in personality psychology, most of which has been published this month.

We’ve been doing some housecleaning of sorts this month, painstakingly reviewing every link on the entire site, removing broken links, and updating old links. This is a big job, as you might imagine, so if you find a broken link or have a new link to suggest please let us know.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Too Pretty to Do Homework?

This summer, JC Penny offered a t-shirt for sale for girls which read ”I’m too pretty to do homework so my brother has to do it for me”. Adding insult to injury was the caption next to the photo of the shirt: ”Who has time for homework when there’s a new Justin Bieber album out? She’ll love this tee that’s just as cute and sassy as she is.” Due to public outcry, sale of the shirt was discontinued as delivering an inappropriate and sexist message.

3. Your Most Awkward Friends May Save Your Life

Your insecure and anxious friends may be better that your secure friends at detecting impending danger and acting quickly according to research by Tsachi Ein-Dor and colleagues, and summarized here in ”LiveScience”, August 17, 2011.

4. Narcissism May Benefit the Young, Researchers Report; But Older Adults? Not So Much

A new study suggests that some forms of narcissism may be beneficial — at least in the short term — for making the transition into adulthood. This, according to research by Patrick Hill and Brent Roberts, published this month in ”Social Psychological and Personality Science” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, August 11, 2011.

5. Review Highlights Flawed Logic of Segregating Boys and Girls for Education Purposes, Based on Alleged Brain Differences

When it comes to learning and education, neuroscience has identified few reliable differences between boys’ and girls’ brains. There is no scientific basis for teaching boys and girls separately according to a review by Lise Eliot published this month in ”Sex Roles” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, August 18, 2011.

6. Teaching Research Methods

Jeff Standen conducted a workshop in 2010 at the ATP Conference on Teaching Psychology. This page contains links to his PowerPoint slides with suggestions for teaching research methods, a research methods mindmap, a PowerPoint-based experiment you can do with your class, PowerPoint slides on correlation, an overview of psychological research methods, levels of measurement, and notes on reliability and validity and much more.

7. Resources for Teaching Neuroscience

Jeff Standen compiled these resources for teaching neuroscience including PowerPoint slides on neurons, the brain and brain research and much more.

8. Evolution and Genetics

Jeff Standen shares his PowerPoint slides on natural selection and genetics.

9. Psychlotron.org.uk

Psychlotron.org.uk is a website of teaching resources for teachers and lecturers. Though aimed at those teaching introductory psychology in the British system, there are many free resources here applicable to those teaching personality psychology including this unit on Freud and Personality.

10. Who Am I? Your Brain

The Science Museum of National Museum of Science and Industry (NMSI), London, UK sponsors an extensive website. Check out their interactive online exhibit on ”Who Am I?” featuring videos, pictures, handouts, and information on understanding your body, your brain, and your genes. This page on ”Your Brain” answers the questions how can illness affect the brain, what happens when you are asleep, how do drugs affect the brain, what are emotions, and others.

11. Who Am I? Your Genes

The Science Museum of National Museum of Science and Industry (NMSI), London, UK sponsors an extensive website. Check out their interactive online exhibit on ”Who Am I?” featuring videos, pictures, handouts, and information on understanding your body, your brain, and your genes. This page on ”Your Genes” answers the questions where did your genes come from, what was the Human Genome project, how do genes affect your health, and others.

12. Attributional Styles Test and Locus of Control

Discovery Health presents this online version of a 10-item locus of control scale with scoring and feedback. However, the real fun begins when you are asked to take the 47-item long version including scales measuring optimistic and pessimistic explanatory style, the three dimensions of internal-external, stable-unstable, global-specific, career and academic locus of control, belief in luck, health locus of control and more. All scales are scored automatically and feedback is provided.

13. Probe the Brain

PBS presents this site where you pretend you are a brain surgeon and get to virtually map out the brain’s motor cortex.

14. MRI — The Magnetic Miracle Game

NobelPrize.org, the official site of the Nobel prize, presents this interactive game which illustrates how an MRI works, why metal can not be near the apparatus, and how does MRI compare to x-ray and CAT images.

15. Brain Facts

The society for neuroscience provides this free 74-page primer on the brain and nervous system designed as an introduction to neuroscience for a lay audience.

16. Heal Thyself: Think Positive

Realism may be bad for your health: believing things will turn out fine or feeling safe and secure may help the body maintain and repair itself according to research by David Creswell and colleagues reviewed in this summary and video (3 minutes, 5 seconds) from ”New Scientist”, August 29, 2011.

17. Multicultural Teaching

The Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan sponsors this page of information and strategies for multicultural teaching. Everything from course planning, teaching social justice,  to responding to difficult decisions, and instructor identity.

18. Store Dresses Down Bride for Being a Lesbian

Yet another illustration of the ignorant and often negative attitudes that non-heterosexual people face. A bridal shop owner refuses to sell a woman a wedding dress because she didn’t want to be associated with an impending ”illegal action”, i.e., her marriage to another woman.

19. The Five Factors

Erica Melkonian put this montage together as an independent study project in her AP Psychology class in May of 2011. In it, she defines and illustrates people who are high and low on each of the five factors including the famous and infamous like Curious George and Adolph Hitler (3 minutes, 38 seconds).

20. Sam Gosling: Snoop: The Secret Language of Stuff

Gosling, author of Snoop, presents an overview of his research to the Commonwealth Club of California in this video. Topics include creativity and openness, Facebook profiles, faking a personal space, and much more. The site includes a biography of Gosling, highlights of the talk, transcript, and the entire talk (1 hour, 7 minutes).

21. Favorite Link Revisited: George Boeree of Shippensburg University

George Boeree should win some sort of award for the ”giving away” of psychology and resources for teaching psychology. He has written electronic textbooks in Personality Theories and General Psychology as well as for Social Psychology, History of Psychology, Qualitative Methods, and Buddhism, and has made them all freely available on the Internet. Thank you George, for all you do to help us teach and learn better!


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 1, September, 2010

September 24, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 1, September, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,122 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

The big news for this month is that we are celebrating the 4th anniversary of this newsletter. In that time, our mailing list has grown to nearly 200 subscribers and even more read us online at our newsletter archive blog (https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/). We thank you all for making us one of your favorite places on the web to find materials for teaching personality psychology.

This month, we found a cute, if questionable study, conducted by a 17-year old winner of a BBC contest. Perhaps her survey of exploring why people choose their Facebook profile photos will inspire your students to conduct studies of their own.

Speaking of Facebook, thanks to John Rust, director of the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University who called our attention to the work of the institute. They have been collecting personality data from over 2 million (!) users of Facebook and will gladly collaborate with other researchers, including grads and undergrads, on research projects related to their dataset. Check out their site below.

If you have a suggestion of an article, summary, exercise, video or anything which you think may be helpful to others, please drop us an e-mail. This month we thank Jon Mueller, John Rust, and two anonymous commenters on our newsletter archive for their suggestions.

Alas, it has come to our attention that the link for signing up for our newsletter has been having problems since July. We apologize for the inconvenience this may have caused potential subscribers. We think we have the problem solved, but just in case, just drop us an e-mail and we can add you to our mailing list ”by hand”.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the top right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Psychometrics Centre

The University of Cambridge Psychometrics Centre conducts research on personality including the five factor model, life satisfaction, self-monitoring, and other constructs collecting data via  Facebook application. They are willing to collaborate and share their data with other researchers (including grads and undergrads) who have ideas for projects. Find out more about their work (including a list of research ideas for students) by visiting MyPersonalityWiki.

2. Rebuilding Maslow’s Pyramid on an Evolutionary Foundation

In focusing on motives and self-actualization, Abraham Maslow may have missed out on key ideas from neuroscience, developmental biology, and evolutionary psychology according to Douglas Kenrick a in a paper published in ”Psychological Science”. He summarizes his view in this blog entry for ”Psychology Today”, May 19, 2010 (See link to original paper below).

3.  Self-Actualization: Parenthood?

Douglas Kenrick and his co-authors redefine Maslow’s concept of self-actualization as ”an indirect means to attracting a mate and, ultimately, parenting children”. Read about the controversy surrounding this redefinition in this ”New York Times” article by Lisa Belkin, September 10, 2010. (Remember, access to articles in the ”New York Times” is free, but you must sign up for a subscription).

4. Kenrick, Griskevicius, Neuberg & Schaller (2010)

Kenrick, D.T., Griskevicius, V., Neuberg, S.L., & Schaller, M. (2010). Renovating the pyramid of needs: Contemporary extensions built upon ancient foundations. ”Perspectives on Psychological Science”, 5, 292-314. (Opens in PDF).

5. What Does Your Facebook Profile Picture Say About You?

As one of the finalists of the BBC Radio 4’s “So You Want to Be a Scientist?” project 17-year old Nina Jones conducted a survey of Facebook users and identified the interesting ways in which people used their photos as a form of self-presentation.

6. Personality Predicts Cheating More Than Academic Struggles

According to research by Delroy Paulhus and colleagues published in the ”Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied” and summarized here, ”College students who admitted to cheating in high school or turned in plagiarized papers ranked high on personality tests of the so-called Dark Triad: psychopathy, Machiavellianism (cynicism, amorality, manipulativeness), and narcissism (arrogance and self-centeredness, with a strong sense of entitlement). Of the three dark personality types, psychopathy was most strongly linked to cheating”. From ”Science Daily”, September 8, 2010.

7. Designing Your Own Workspace Improves Health, Happiness and Productivity

”Employees who have control over the design and layout of their workspace are not only happier and healthier — they’re also up to 32% more productive” according to research by Craig Knight at the University of Exeter and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, September 8, 2010.

8. Childhood Personality Traits Predict Adult Behavior: We Remain Recognizably the Same Person, Study Suggests

”Using data from a 1960s study of approximately 2,400 ethnically diverse elementary schoolchildren in Hawaii, researchers compared teacher personality ratings of the students with videotaped interviews of 144 of those individuals 40 years later […] Personality traits observed in childhood are a strong predictor of adult behavior” according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside, the Oregon Research Institute and University of Oregon and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, August 5, 2010.

9. Stories of the Middle Passage

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology Talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #244, August 19 2010). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Jungian analysis James Hollis as he describes the theory of Carl Jung, especially as it pertains to the second half of life (middle age and beyond) (runs 1 hour, 3 minutes, and 35 seconds).

10. Economic Status, Genetics, Together Influence Psychopathic Traits

”Researchers studying the genetic roots of antisocial behavior report that children with one variant of a serotonin transporter gene are more likely to exhibit psychopathic traits if they also grow up poor” according to research by Edelyn Verona and colleagues, published in the ”Journal of Abnormal Psychology” and summarized in this article from Science Daily, August 7, 2010.

11. ABC Model That is the Central Basis of REBT

In this essay, therapist Stacey McCall reviews her use of Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy with a 17-year old male client. Posted September 4, 2010, on the Creativity and Conflict Blog.

12. What Clients Think CBT Will Be Like and How It Really Is

”People expect cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to be more prescriptive than it is, and therapists to be more controlling than they really are. That’s according to a series of interviews with 18 clients who undertook 8 sessions (14 hours) of CBT to help with their diagnosis of generalised anxiety disorder” according to research by H. Westra and colleagues published in Psychotherapy Research and summarized here.

13. My Life In Therapy

Writer Daphne Merkin, who struggles with chronic depression, describes her experiences with psychotherapy which started when she was 10 years old.

14. Feeling Angry or Guilty? Maybe It’s Time to Stop “Shoulding!”

Therapist Clifford Lazarus argues that living under self-imposed “should, oughts, and musts” creates anger and guilt which makes life miserable for themselves and those around them.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 12, August, 2010

August 26, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 12, August, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at Personality Pedagogy. For more about the links below and approximately 2,107 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: Personality Pedagogy.

The big news for this month is that we are celebrating our own Marianne Miserandino, who won the American Psychological Association, Society for the Teaching of Psychology (Division Two) Robert S. Daniel Teaching Excellence Award. Among the many achievements which won her this award is the web site Personality Pedagogy and this very newsletter you are reading! See http://bulletin.arcadia.edu/2010/08/miserandino-accepts-national-award-for-teaching-in-san-diego/ for more information.

This month we are also excited to have found links to the entire ”Gloria” films which now completes our collection! Do you remember this classic 1965 film ”Three Psychotherapies”, where Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis each conduct a therapy session with Gloria? Gloria chose to continue having therapy with Perls, but later regretted not continuing with Carl Rogers. She initiated a warm correspondence with Rogers and his family which continued until her death. Her daughter ”Pammy” (Pamela J. Burry) wrote a biography of Gloria in 2008, ”Living with ‘The Gloria Films”’.

We also have an interesting link to a TED Talk by Sheena Iyengar, Psycho-Economist on the Art of Choosing. In case you don’t know, TED is a small nonprofit devoted to ”Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design.” Some of their previous psychologist speakers have included Martin Seligman, Daniel Gilbert, and Philip Zimbardo. Check out Iyengar, and the others in this fascinating series, if you haven’t already.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the top right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino at arcadia dot edu

1. Carl Rogers: Client-Centered Therapy with Gloria

Carl Rogers doing psychotherapy from the classic film ”Three Approaches to Psychotherapy” (1965) in which Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis each give a demonstration of their approach to therapy with the real client ”Gloria”. The entire section on Rogers is presented here in 5 parts (total runs about 30 minutes).

2. Fritz Perls: Gestalt Therapy with Gloria (29 minutes: 30 seconds)

Fritz Perls doing psychotherapy from the classic film ”Three Approaches to Psychotherapy” (1965) in which Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis each give a demonstration of their approach to therapy with the real client ”Gloria”. (about 30 minutes)

3. Albert Ellis: Rational Emotive Therapy with Gloria. (29 minutes: 48 seconds)

Albert Ellis doing psychotherapy from the classic film ”Three Approaches to Psychotherapy” (1965) in which Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis each give a demonstration of their approach to therapy with the real client ”Gloria”. (about 30 minutes)

4. TeachPsychScience: Resources for Teaching Research and Statistics in Psychology

Gary W. Lewandowski, Natalie Ciarocco and David Strohmetz created this site containing links to peer-reviewed resources for teaching research methods and statistics including online demonstrations, descriptions of class demonstrations, class and lab activities, class assignments, lecture materials, PowerPoints, exemplar studies, and student exercises.

5. What Does Your Avatar Say About You?

”Old or young, beautiful or sinister — the choices are endless when designing an avatar or a virtual alter ego. In the end, do people choose one that is really different from themselves? Usually not, according to new Concordia University research that shows in most cases, avatars reflect the personality of their creators” according to research by H. Onur Bodur and Jean-Francois Belisle published in the August issue of ”Psychology and Marketing” and summarized in ”Science Daily,” July 26, 2010.

6. Should Kids Be Bribed To Do Well in School?

Describes the fascinating and controversial work by Harvard Economist Roland Fryer who studied financial incentives in the classroom in schools in Chicago, Dallas, Washington and New York. Using sound research design, kids were paid for outcomes like good test scores, not fighting, attendance, or reading. The surprising result was that the reading group did the best of all groups on standardized reading scores, and continued to excel the following year in the absence of rewards. Read the details here in this first published summary of his work from ”Time” magazine, April 8, 2010, by Amanda Ripley.

7. Regulations and Ethical Guidelines for Human Subjects Research

The Office of Human Subjects Research of the National Institutes of Health maintains this site which describes their regulations and ethical guidelines for research with human participants, including The Code of Federal Regulations (Title 45 and 46) outlining the functions and operations of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs); The Belmont Report of ethical principles and guidelines for the protection of human subjects of research; and The Nuremburg Code directives for human experimentation.

8. Test Your Cultural Awareness

Kwintessential, a company specializing in intercultural communication, translation, interpretation, and training provides these free online tests of respondents’ cultural awareness and knowledge. Includes quizzes of country locations, world capitals, world languages, and cultural awareness like business card etiquette and dining etiquette. There are a few general quizzes as well as over 20 tests of cultural awareness in specific countries including Argentina, Belarus, Bolivia, Chile, Egypt, Iran, Turkey and more.

9. Cultural Understanding: Teaching Resources from the Peace Corps

The Paul D. Coverdell World Wise Schools program of the Peace Corps provides resources to enrich the K-12 classroom (many can be modified for college-level classes) ranging from publications, speakers, volunteer stories, multimedia, service learning, classroom projects, and lesson plans. Many of the lesson plans include exercises and simulations for teaching diversity in social studies, science, literature, and psychology classes.

10. You Are Sexually Attracted to Your Parents And Yourself

According to research by R. Chris Fraley and Michael J. Marks, ”Westermarck, Freud, and the Incest Taboo: Does Familial Resemblance Activate Sexual Attraction?” Published online in the ”Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” July 20, 2010, and summarized here, ”People appear to be drawn to others who resembler their kin or themselves”. The summary reports that ”All three experiments support the Freudian idea that we have subconscious mechanisms that make us attracted to features that remind us of our own, and that cultural taboos against incest exist to override that primitive drive.”

11. 5 Reliable Findings From Happiness Research

John Grohol compiled this list including lottery winnings create only short-term happiness, the importance of relationships and experiences over money and possessions, and how we can control about 40-50% of our own happiness and briefly discusses some of the criticisms of the positive psychology movement.

12. Science Fair Projects and Experiments

Topics, ideas, resources, and sample projects for primary, elementary, middle and high school students and teachers compiled by Julian Rubin. Includes science fair projects types, the scientific method, the display board for many topics in Psychology and Human Behavior. Personality projects include: Myers-Briggs type indicator, addictive behavior, birth order, stress and self-esteem, mood and humor, and more. With minor modifications, some topics and projects may also be suitable for college-level laboratory classes in personality psychology.

13. TED Talk: Sheena Iyengar, Psycho-Economist On the Art of Choosing

For Americans, choosing is a way of asserting our individuality, while in other cultures deferring to the choices of respected others is a way of creating community and fostering harmony. Her her talk about her work on choice, locus of control, and culture, including the famous 24 varieties of jam study, in this TED talk. (Posted July 2010. Duration: 24:05)

14. Personality May Influence Brain Shrinkage in Aging

Studying MRI images of volunteers aged 44-88 researchers found ”lower volumes of gray matter in the frontal and medial temporal brain regions of volunteers who ranked high in neuroticism traits, compared with higher volumes of gray matter in those who ranked high in conscientious traits” according to research by Jonathan Jackson, David A. Balota, and Denise Head published in the journal ”Neurobiology and Aging” and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, April 27, 2010.

15. Changing Thoughts Key to Battling Even Severe Depression

”Moderate to severely depressed clients showed greater improvement in cognitive therapy when therapists emphasized changing how they think rather than how they behave, new research has found.” According to research by Daniel R. Strunk, Melissa A. Brotman and Robert J. DeRubeis published in the journal Behaviour Research and Therapy, and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, May 14, 2010.

16. Sigmund Freud

Excellent overview of Freud’s life, theory, therapy, and references, including a critical look at the claim to scientific status of his theory and the efficacy of psychoanalytic therapy.