Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 4, December 2014

December 18, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,098 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

If you are looking for signs of the season, look no further than this issue. Below, we are pleased to present to you links to research on children’s emotions while waiting for Santa and a special name-that-psychologist version of Michael Britt’s holiday classic “The Psych Elves”. Of course, we also have more academic links like theories of emotion, brain imaging and risk-taking, chronotypes, and the possible benefit of mixed emotions like nervous laughter and tears of joy.

We wish you and your students a very happy holiday season!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Comparing the 5 Theories of Emotion

Psychiatrist Beppe Micallef-Trigona briefly reviews the James-Lange theory, the Canon-Bard theory, the Schachter two-factor theory, the Cognitive-Mediational theory of Lazarus, and the facial feedback theory in this article for “Brain Blogger”. Posted October, 2014.

3. Can Brain Imaging Detect Risk Takers?

Apparently so, according to new research summarized here. Research by DeWitt et al. published in “Psychiatry Research” and by Helfinstein et al. published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America” found correlations between brain structures and risk-taking. From “Brain Blogger” October 2014.

4. You’ve heard of “Owls” and “Larks”, now sleep scientists propose two more chronotypes

Research by Arcady Putilov and his colleagues finds evidence for a “high energetic” group who feel high energy in both the morning and in the evening, and a “lethargic” group who feel sleepy in both the morning and in the evening. From the “British Psychological Society Research Digest”, November 5, 2014.

5. Personality Disorders in the Media

The “Psychology in Action” website presents this look at famous characters who may fit the criteria of a personality disorder. Summarizes the criteria and the evidence for schizoid,  schizotypal, antisocial, borderline, histrionic, narcissistic, and dependent personality disorders. Posted October, 2013.

6. How Good Are You At Reading People?

How good at you at identifying the basic emotional expressions in the eyes and face? Here is a fun quiz based on the research by Paul Ekman and others on facial expression of the basic emotions.

7. Scary Santa Scholarship

Summarizes the work of John Trinkaus, called the Scary Santa Studies, on the facial expressions of children waiting to see Santa at a department store. The emotion most often shown across the four studies? Indifference.

8. How To Become A Morning Person

The “Business Insider” published this info graphic summarizing the research on chronotypes, including helpful information on how to shift your body clock to be more of a morning person. Published December 16, 2014.

9. Nervous Laughter, Tears of Joy

These incongruous — and other often inappropriate and embarrassing emotional expressions — may actually help us to regulate our emotions. “That is, when we are at risk of being overwhelmed by our emotions — either positive or negative — expressing the opposite emotion can have a dampening effect and restore emotional balance” according to psychologist Wray Herbert writing for “The Huffington Post”, November, 2014.

10. The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

The ability to monitor one’s own and other people’s emotions, while generally an important social skill, may also have a dark side. According to a study recently published in the “Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology”, “Young women with higher emotional intelligence are more likely to commit acts of delinquency”. From “The Huffington Post”, November, 2014.

11. Acing the Marshmallow Test

Lea Winerman, writing for the APA “Monitor on Psychology,” presents this interview with Walter Mischel on his research on delay of gratification and the marshmallow test.

12. Did B. F. Skinner Raise His Children in a Skinner Box?

Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast created this animation of Skinner talking — using Skinner’s actual voice and responses — to answer this long held belief in unique and entertaining way (Runs 3 minutes, 59 seconds). Posted October, 2014.

13. Psychology’s Most Famous Elves

Michael Britt, of “The Psych Files” podcast, did it again. He turned these 8 famous psychologists — among them Sigmund Freud and Anna Freud — into Elves with a special guest appearance by Melanie Klein. Can you identify who they all are? (runs 2 minutes 1 second). Posted December, 2014.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: The Psych Elves

Michael Britt, of “The Psych Files” podcast, had the temerity to turn these three personality psychologists into Elves. Can you identify them? (Runs 51 seconds).

Advertisements

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 6, February, 2013

February 27, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,740 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Have you ever wondered what is all the fuss about the “Twilight” series? This month we are pleased to bring you a chapter from Donna Ashcraft’s new book “Deconstructing Twilight”. In it, she takes psychological and feminist approaches to understanding the characters. She and her publisher have graciously agreed to let “Personality Pedagogy” publish Chapter 7 from her book. Here, she analyzes Bella and her relationships with her parents and with Edward to illustrate aspects of Karen Horney’s theory. Ashcroft’s analysis is sure to spark discussion among your fan-students and to get you to think about young adult literature — and personality theories — in a new way.

This month, in honor of using fictional characters as case studies to illustrate personality theories, we revisit one of our favorite links. The NPR program “In Character” presents an in-depth look at more fictional characters suitable for analysis in your personality class.

Finally, I just couldn’t resist throwing in the “World’s Shortest Personality Test” (see link below). My students enjoyed taking it and critiquing it afterwards. We were able to draw on their “results” to see if it matched up to their personality according to a valid measure of the Five Factors. They could readily understand convergent validity and the need for criterion validity through this little demonstration. Try it!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Deconstructing Twilight

Drawing on classic theorists including Carl Jung, Karen Horney, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers and others, Donna Ashcraft takes a psychological and feminist approach to understanding the “Twilight” characters in her book “Deconstructing Twilight: Psychological and Feminist Perspectives on the Series”. Thanks to her publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., you can read and download a PDF of Chapter 7 in which she uses Karen Horney’s 10 neurotic needs to understand the dynamics between Bella and her parents, Bella and Edward, and more. The second link takes you to the Amazon.com page for her book.

3. World’s Quickest Personality Test

Are you imaginative, analytical, or suspicious? Richard Wiseman describes how to assess your personality via this quick measure. A fun way to introduce personality testing and the importance of validity to your students. (runs 1 minute, 26 seconds).

4. Men Are From Earth, Women Are From Earth

“From empathy and sexuality to science inclination and extroversion, statistical analysis of 122 different characteristics involving 13,301 individuals shows that men and women, by and large, do not fall into different groups” according to research by Bobbi Carothers and Harry Reis (2013) published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”. Includes a graphic comparing distributions of men and women on physical strength and masculinity-assertiveness; and a video of Harry Reis explaining their work and what it means (runs 3 minutes, 24 seconds).

5. Willpower Expert Roy Baumeister on Staying in Control

Roy Baumeister explains what willpower is, what depletes our willpower, and how we can manage our willpower to achieve our goals in this interview from “Time”, January 14, 2013.

6. Mistakes Improve Children’s Learning While Building Competence and Autonomy

We need not always protect children from mistakes; mistakes can be part of the learning and discovery process and actually increase learning. Children build competence through mastering challenges, and autonomy though trying new approaches.

7. How to Become Highly Skilled in CBT

“In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Drs. Aaron and Judith Beck discuss the process of improving as a therapist. Like most skills, excellent therapy skills are achieved over time with good training and experience. Dr. Aaron Beck emphasizes the importance of utilizing patient feedback, as well as learning from colleagues and supervisors. Dr. Judith Beck discusses the importance of keeping an open mind in one’s progression as a therapist, including incorporating new techniques from other fields of therapy within the CBT framework.” Published by the Beck Institute, January 16, 2013.

8. Design Your Own Implicit Association Tests (IAT)

Adam Meade, North Carolina State University, has created this website where researchers can create their own IATs using free open-source software on this website.

9. Research Methods and Statistics Concept Maps

Alexis Grosofsky, Beloit College, created these concept maps of topics typically covered in undergraduate methods and statistics courses. These maps will help students organize material and see the “bigger picture” of how these concepts relate to each other. Each of these 11 maps could be used as an introduction, summary, or quick refresher (opens in PDF format).

10. Teaching Statistics: Not Awful and Boring

Jessica Hartnett, Gannon University, started this blog where she shares online resources for teaching statistic to undergraduates. In her own words: “Most of [the suggestions] are funny. A few of them are serious but engaging. At no point will I suggest that you count M&M colors (although there is nothing wrong with that). Also, I’m not making any money off of this, I just know how hard it can be to teach statistics/research methods and thought I would share what I have.”

11. fMRI: Real-Time Self-Regulation of Emotion Networks

Using fMRI, 8 patients with depression were able to increase activity in areas of the brain related to positive emotion and lowered their depression through neuro(bio)feedback. A control group who went through similar cognitive strategies but without the feedback did not show such improvement. Includes downloadable slides of their findings.

12. Mindfulness neuroscience

Neuropsychologist Deric Bownds summarizes findings from a special issue of the journal “Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience” devoted to meditation and the brain. He describes four possible mechanisms by which meditation works and discusses the problem of control groups and random assignment in meditation research.

13. Do You Know What Determines Your Happiness?

Eric Karpinski, muses on the impact of genetics, external circumstances, and our own actions and thoughts on our happiness. Posted August 11, 2011.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: In Character: Tricksters, Vamps, Heroes, Scamps

“From Darth Vader to Scarlett O’Hara, the best fictional characters reflect something about who we are and how we got here.” In Character, “a [2008] six-month series from NPR, explores indelible American characters from fiction, folklore and pop culture.” Hear experts discuss the psychology of characters such as Vernon Waters (“A Soldier’s Story”), Willie Stark (“All the King’s Men”), Charlotte (“Charlotte’s Web”), Auntie Mame, Uncle Tom, Henry Fleming (“The Red Badge of Courage”), The Joker, Norman Bates, Nancy Drew, Jo March (“Little Woman”), King Kong, Mr. Spock, Carrie (“Sex and the City”), Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Ricky Ricardo, Charlie Brown, Fred Sanford, Indiana Jones, Dora the Explorer, Mama Rose, Hanibal Lecter, Portnoy, Eric Cartman (“South Park”), Walter Mitty, Catwoman, Blanche DuBois, Captain Ahab, Barbie, Harriet the Spy, Hester Prynne (“The Scarlet Letter”), Elmer Gantry, Darth Vader, Gordon Gekko (“Wall Street”), Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp, Cookie Monster, George Jefferson, Willy Loman (“Death of a Salesman”), Huckleberry Finn, Scarlett O’Hara, Pollyanna, Holden Caulfield, The Lone Ranger, Lassie, Bugs Bunny, and others.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 11, July, 2011

July 19, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,270 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are in full summer mode and the links below reflect our this: procrastinating, relaxing, contemplating the perfect summer day, and discussing the latest Harry Potter movie with friends. We’ll keep this newsletter short and sweet, to let you get back to your favorite summer activities.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Sleep type predicts day and night batting averages of Major League Baseball players

According to research presented by Christopher Winter at the Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, baseball players who are morning larks have a higher batting average than night owls for day games, but lower averages for night games.

3. Gender is Dead! Long Live Gender!

In this blog from NPR, Alva Noe draws on research on gender and gender differences which illustrates the power of social categories, identity, and stereotype threat in causing gender differences in personality. As real as these differences are in people’s everyday lives, Noe explains, they suggest that personality differences between the sexes are not innate and biological.

4. Researchers and Research Labs: Moffitt and Caspi

This extensive website of developmental psychology researchers Terrie Moffitt and Avshalom Caspi presents an overview of their research, links to publications, a section on what’s new, and more. Of particular interest is a special section on Gene X Environment effects, including empirical studies, theory and methods, public engagement, topics of debate, and summaries of their work suitable for classroom discussion.

5. This is Your Life (and How You Tell It)

Presents an overview of the work of Dan McAdams and others on how personality is revealed in the stories people tell about themselves. From ”The New York Times”, May 22, 2007.

6. Procrastination

Cartoonist Lev Yilmaz describes how his stuff (doesn’t) gets done in this entertaining video ”Tales Of Mere Existence: Procrastination”, to which many of us can relate.

7. Perfectionism: Impossible Dream

”Perfectionism may be hurting you in more ways than you think. Ultimately, productivity suffers” according to this old, but still relevant, summary from ”Psychology Today” from May 1, 1995.

8. The Many Faces of Perfectionism

A good overview of research findings on perfectionism which suggest that perfectionism is not adaptive and can contribute to depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and other problems. From the APA ”Monitor on Psychology”, Volume 34, Number 10, p. 18, November 2003, by Etienne Benson.

9. It’s Not Harry Potter

Rob Weir explains how to teach students to read journal articles by encouraging them to consider the following: purpose and reading strategy, main points and new claims, abstracts and introductions, habits of the writer, evaluating evidence, concrete examples, skimming and moving on and more.

10. Favorite Link Revisited: The Three Neurotic Personality Styles by Karen Horney

Do you know of characters who illustrate Karen Horney’s description of the three neurotic personality styles of compliant, aggressive, and detached? Here’s your change to contribute to ”Personality Pedagogy” by adding your suggestions to the table. You can also use the suggestions here to get your students thinking about Horney’s theory . . .  and also about their favorite characters from Harry Potter.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 1, September, 2010

September 24, 2010

maskimages

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 1, September, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,122 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

The big news for this month is that we are celebrating the 4th anniversary of this newsletter. In that time, our mailing list has grown to nearly 200 subscribers and even more read us online at our newsletter archive blog (https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/). We thank you all for making us one of your favorite places on the web to find materials for teaching personality psychology.

This month, we found a cute, if questionable study, conducted by a 17-year old winner of a BBC contest. Perhaps her survey of exploring why people choose their Facebook profile photos will inspire your students to conduct studies of their own.

Speaking of Facebook, thanks to John Rust, director of the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University who called our attention to the work of the institute. They have been collecting personality data from over 2 million (!) users of Facebook and will gladly collaborate with other researchers, including grads and undergrads, on research projects related to their dataset. Check out their site below.

If you have a suggestion of an article, summary, exercise, video or anything which you think may be helpful to others, please drop us an e-mail. This month we thank Jon Mueller, John Rust, and two anonymous commenters on our newsletter archive for their suggestions.

Alas, it has come to our attention that the link for signing up for our newsletter has been having problems since July. We apologize for the inconvenience this may have caused potential subscribers. We think we have the problem solved, but just in case, just drop us an e-mail and we can add you to our mailing list ”by hand”.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the top right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Psychometrics Centre

The University of Cambridge Psychometrics Centre conducts research on personality including the five factor model, life satisfaction, self-monitoring, and other constructs collecting data via  Facebook application. They are willing to collaborate and share their data with other researchers (including grads and undergrads) who have ideas for projects. Find out more about their work (including a list of research ideas for students) by visiting MyPersonalityWiki.

2. Rebuilding Maslow’s Pyramid on an Evolutionary Foundation

In focusing on motives and self-actualization, Abraham Maslow may have missed out on key ideas from neuroscience, developmental biology, and evolutionary psychology according to Douglas Kenrick a in a paper published in ”Psychological Science”. He summarizes his view in this blog entry for ”Psychology Today”, May 19, 2010 (See link to original paper below).

3.  Self-Actualization: Parenthood?

Douglas Kenrick and his co-authors redefine Maslow’s concept of self-actualization as ”an indirect means to attracting a mate and, ultimately, parenting children”. Read about the controversy surrounding this redefinition in this ”New York Times” article by Lisa Belkin, September 10, 2010. (Remember, access to articles in the ”New York Times” is free, but you must sign up for a subscription).

4. Kenrick, Griskevicius, Neuberg & Schaller (2010)

Kenrick, D.T., Griskevicius, V., Neuberg, S.L., & Schaller, M. (2010). Renovating the pyramid of needs: Contemporary extensions built upon ancient foundations. ”Perspectives on Psychological Science”, 5, 292-314. (Opens in PDF).

5. What Does Your Facebook Profile Picture Say About You?

As one of the finalists of the BBC Radio 4’s “So You Want to Be a Scientist?” project 17-year old Nina Jones conducted a survey of Facebook users and identified the interesting ways in which people used their photos as a form of self-presentation.

6. Personality Predicts Cheating More Than Academic Struggles

According to research by Delroy Paulhus and colleagues published in the ”Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied” and summarized here, ”College students who admitted to cheating in high school or turned in plagiarized papers ranked high on personality tests of the so-called Dark Triad: psychopathy, Machiavellianism (cynicism, amorality, manipulativeness), and narcissism (arrogance and self-centeredness, with a strong sense of entitlement). Of the three dark personality types, psychopathy was most strongly linked to cheating”. From ”Science Daily”, September 8, 2010.

7. Designing Your Own Workspace Improves Health, Happiness and Productivity

”Employees who have control over the design and layout of their workspace are not only happier and healthier — they’re also up to 32% more productive” according to research by Craig Knight at the University of Exeter and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, September 8, 2010.

8. Childhood Personality Traits Predict Adult Behavior: We Remain Recognizably the Same Person, Study Suggests

”Using data from a 1960s study of approximately 2,400 ethnically diverse elementary schoolchildren in Hawaii, researchers compared teacher personality ratings of the students with videotaped interviews of 144 of those individuals 40 years later […] Personality traits observed in childhood are a strong predictor of adult behavior” according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside, the Oregon Research Institute and University of Oregon and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, August 5, 2010.

9. Stories of the Middle Passage

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology Talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #244, August 19 2010). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Jungian analysis James Hollis as he describes the theory of Carl Jung, especially as it pertains to the second half of life (middle age and beyond) (runs 1 hour, 3 minutes, and 35 seconds).

10. Economic Status, Genetics, Together Influence Psychopathic Traits

”Researchers studying the genetic roots of antisocial behavior report that children with one variant of a serotonin transporter gene are more likely to exhibit psychopathic traits if they also grow up poor” according to research by Edelyn Verona and colleagues, published in the ”Journal of Abnormal Psychology” and summarized in this article from Science Daily, August 7, 2010.

11. ABC Model That is the Central Basis of REBT

In this essay, therapist Stacey McCall reviews her use of Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy with a 17-year old male client. Posted September 4, 2010, on the Creativity and Conflict Blog.

12. What Clients Think CBT Will Be Like and How It Really Is

”People expect cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to be more prescriptive than it is, and therapists to be more controlling than they really are. That’s according to a series of interviews with 18 clients who undertook 8 sessions (14 hours) of CBT to help with their diagnosis of generalised anxiety disorder” according to research by H. Westra and colleagues published in Psychotherapy Research and summarized here.

13. My Life In Therapy

Writer Daphne Merkin, who struggles with chronic depression, describes her experiences with psychotherapy which started when she was 10 years old.

14. Feeling Angry or Guilty? Maybe It’s Time to Stop “Shoulding!”

Therapist Clifford Lazarus argues that living under self-imposed “should, oughts, and musts” creates anger and guilt which makes life miserable for themselves and those around them.