Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 1, September, 2012

September 29, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-third Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,582 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

By now, many of us are fully into the swing of the new school year and another fall semester. At my school, many classes are having their first round of exams. For many students, this means hunkering down to the real work of the semester. For many faculty, it means lagging energy for prep work or temptation of the outdoors or other fall fun-related activities. We think the links below may be just the thing to lure your attention back into teaching personality!

This month we hit upon a web page of Mark Leary, a personality psychologist who has created a number of interesting scales, which he makes freely available on his website. We’ve added links to impostorism, propensity to blush, fear of negative evaluation, the need to belong, social physique anxiety, and others, bring our total number of valid and reliable personality tests to nearly 100, the largest collection anywhere on the web. To tie into this trove of materials, we’re revisiting one of our favorite links which introduces students to the Barnum Effect.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than “Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Five Keys to Enhancing Your Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence is “absolutely essential in the formation, development, maintenance, and enhancement of close personal relationships”. Find out how to increase your IQ using these five suggestions from Preston Ni for “Psychology Today”, January 2012.

3. Freud’s Not Dead; He’s Just Really Hard to Find

While traditional psychoanalysis does not qualify as an evidence-based treatment, this does not mean that Freud is dead according to Susan Krauss Whitbourne, for “Psychology Today”, May 2012.

4. Reading the Red Book: How C. G. Jung Salvaged His Soul

According to Stephen A. Diamond, “C.G. Jung’s  Red Book  begins as a detailed log of one man’s personal, lonely “nekyia” or night sea journey to the underworld and ends with his heroic return to the outer world renewed, much like a latter day Dante, Jonah or Ulysses. This, as he came to understand, is an excellent description of what real psychotherapy is or can be all about.” From “Psychology Today”, February 2011.

5. Phineas Gage For the 21st Century

A 24-year old Brazilian construction worker survived after a 6-foot metal bar fell from above and pierced his head according to this article from the Associated Press which ran August 17, 2012. Click here for a video version of the story (50 seconds).

6. Psychology’s Tall Tales: The Real Story of Phineas Gage

From the website: “Graduate student instructors can demonstrate the importance of critical thinking by taking a closer look at the tales of Kitty Genovese and Phineas Gage.” According to some psychologists and historians, Phineas Gage was not as impaired as was once thought, and was, in fact, able to hold down a steady job. (And, in case you were wondering, witnesses claim to have called the police and helped Genovese.)

7. TOPSS Lesson Plan Revised: Biological Bases of Behavior

Teaching of Psychology in the Secondary School (TOPSS) and the APA Education Directorate are pleased to announce a newly revised lesson plan on Biological Bases of Behavior. The lesson plan includes lessons on the brain and neural function, the neuron, the organization of the nervous system, localization of function of the brain, lateralization of function of the brain, the endocrine system, and behavioral genetics.  Five teaching activities are included in the unit plan, and two online modules aligned to the unit are also available through the website above, one on key points to remember in biopsychology and one of classroom demonstrations for the unit. Note: You must be a member of TOPSS to access the materials.

8. Gender: Philip Zimbardo: The Demise of Guys?

In this TED talk Psychologist Philip Zimbardo asks, “Why are boys struggling?” He shares some stats (lower graduation rates, greater worries about intimacy and relationships) and suggests a few reasons, and challenges the TED community to think about solutions. (Posted August 2011. Duration: 4:47)

9. Sexist Vintage Ads

The Huffington Post presents this slide show of 18 “cringe-worthy vintage ads targeting married couples.” A good way to start out a discussion of gender differences by getting students to think about what people once believed men and women to be like and discussing the evidence (or lack thereof) for some of these out-dated images.

10. Interaction Anxiousness

From Leary, M. R. (1983). Social anxiousness: The construct and its measurement. “Journal of Personality Assessment, 47”, 66-75.

11. Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation

From Leary, M. R. (1983). A brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale. “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 9”, 371-376.

12. Need to Belong

From Leary, M. R., Kelly, K. M., Cottrell, C. A., & Schreindorfer, L. S. (2007). Individual differences in the need to belong: Mapping the nomological network. Unpublished manuscript, Duke University.

13. Blushing Propensity

From Leary, M. R., & Meadows, S. (1991). Predictors, elicitors, and concomitants of social blushing. “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60”, 254-262.

14. Hurt Feelings

From Leary, M. R., & Springer, C. (2001). Hurt feelings: The neglected emotion. In R. M. Kowalski (Ed.), Aversive behaviors and relational transgressions. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

15. Impostorism

From Leary, M. R., Patton, K., Orlando, A., & Funk, W. W. (2000). The impostor phenomenon: Self-perceptions, reflected appraisals, and interpersonal strategies. “Journal of Personality, 68”, 725-756.

16. Social Physique Anxiety

From Hart, E. A., Leary, M. R., & Rejeski, W. J. (1989). The measurement of social physique anxiety. “Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 11”, 94-104.

17. Favorite Link Revisited: The Barnum Effect

Take this test to remind yourself why good personality tests should provide specific feedback…and why horoscopes are so much fun! This online test of 47 questions plus some background demographics gives the appearance of a legitimate personality test. Respondents receive the typical Barnum feedback and rate how accurate it is. The beauty of this on-line version is that students can change some of their answers and see that their description never changes. In the words of Prof. Birnbaum at Fullerton State who developed this page, “Self-validation is no validation” according to the explanation given here.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 12, August, 2012

August 6, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-second Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,567 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Personality Pedagogy this month is all about ethics. In July, the Society for the Teaching of Psychology’s Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) introduced two new resources to help instructors teach students about ethics. The first one focuses on ethical issues in research and is called “Beyond Milgram: Expanding Research Ethics Education to Participant Responsibilities”. The second, “Educating Students About Plagiarism,” focuses on plagiarism and provides materials to help students and instructors recognize and respond to plagiarism. You will find links to these two resources below, along with a few other sites on research ethics, including the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, Teaching Ethical Issues Through Movies and Other Art Resources, Moral Games for Teaching Ethics, and a repeat of the link to the complete set of three videos on Protecting Human Subjects Training from the United States Health Resources and Services Administration.

This month, Personality Pedagogy is pleased to debut two new pages. We have collected so many links to assignments, exercises, activities, case studies, electronic texts, examples, illustrations, lectures, lecture notes, lecture slides, tests, measures, scales, and audio and visual resources that we had to create stand-alone pages for Happiness and for Personality Development. Until now, resources for Happiness were mixed in the general Positive Psychology page, while resources for Personality Development, including stability, change, and personality coherence, were mixed in the Trait Theories page. We hope this change will help instructors find quality resources more efficiently.

If you, like us, are savoring what’s left of the summer with one eye out on the year ahead, don’t forget to check out our General Resources page where you can find lots of ideas, from ice-breakers for the first day of class to clickers and crossword puzzles, to study strategies and online textbooks in personality theory. Whether you are new to teaching personality or an “old dog” who could use some new tricks and a little inspiration, there’s something for everybody there. Check it out!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than “Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Beyond Milgram: Expanding Research Ethics Education to Participant Responsibilities

By Larissa K. Barber (Northern Illinois University) and Patricia G. Bagsby (Saint Louis University), this 33 page document describes participant ethics and an educational approach to participant rights and responsibilities that addresses the reciprocal nature of the researcher-participant relationship. It also provides four instructor resources: (a) websites that discuss participants’ rights and responsibilities, (b) a student learning module, (c) supplemental module resources (a Knowledge Retention Quiz, Answers to the quiz, a questionnaire to assess students’ beliefs about research ethics, and suggested discussion questions), and (d) references for additional resources and readings.

3. UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights

The declaration, endorsed in 2005, addresses “ethical issues related to medicine, life sciences and associated technologies as applied to human beings, taking into account their social, legal and environmental dimensions.” Available in English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese and Arabic.

4. Teaching Bioethics: Ethical Issues Through Movies and Other Art Resources

This program takes users through UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights exploring human dignity and human rights, benefit and harm, autonomy and responsibility, respect, equality, privacy, cultural diversity and more. Each unit includes 2-5 minute video excerpts from movies (e.g., “Twelve Angry Men”) and TV shows (e.g., “Grey’s Anatomy”) to spark discussion. Also available in Spanish.

5. Moral Games for Teaching Bioethics

Darryl R. J. Macer wrote this UNESCO guide for instructors teaching bioethics. Through these 43 games which spark critical thinking and values clarification as students “plan, act, monitor, evaluate, and reflect on moral choices.” Opens in PDF format.

6. Exploring Bioethics

Developed with the NIH Department of Bioethics and written by Education Development Center, Inc. this guide “supports high school biology teachers in raising and addressing bioethical issues with their students and engages students in rigorous thinking and discussions. By providing conceptual guidelines that promote careful thinking about difficult cases, it stresses the importance of presenting thoughtful and relevant reasons for considered positions on ethical issues”. The guide includes six teaching modules each with activities, masters, lesson plans, and teacher support materials. While designed for grades 9-12 most of the information is readily adaptable to college level courses. Two of the modules are particularly suitable for psychology classes (e.g., research ethics of human experimentation, genetic testing).

7. Educating Students About Plagiarism

By Marika Lamoreaux, Kim Darnell, Elizabeth Sheehan, and Chantal
Tusher (Georgia State University), this resource contains materials to help educate students about plagiarism and to help faculty understand how to handle it if it occurs. Included are an overview for faculty “Educating Students,” a slide show for a lecture “Plagiarism,” a worksheet for students “Recognizing Plagiarism,” a plagiarism contract students sign “Plagiarism Contract,” suggested answers faculty can offer to respond to common student excuses “Answers to Common Excuses,” and a flowchart showing how one university handles plagiarism reports “Academic Dishonesty Flowchart.”

8. Technology for Educators

Created by psychologist Sue Franz “finding new technologies so you don’t have to” where she shares her discoveries of technology which enhances her teaching or the learning of her students. Includes an overview and description of tech essentials, handouts from her workshops, and handy information on everything from blogging to presentations to file management and downloading videos.

9. 10 Fun Activities for Adjectives of Personality

Originally designed for English teachers to help their students understand and describe nuances of character, this site offers 10 activities exploring adjectives helping students to describe the personality of themselves and others. Includes links to positive personality adjectives and negative personality adjectives. Good for an ice breaker or as a class exercise to introduce trait theory.

10. The Shadow Exercise

As part of the “Teaching Clinical Psychology” webpage, John Suler, Rider University, includes this exercise on the shadow. Students reflect on a person they don’t like very much and consider if the traits they dislike in another reflect traits they don’t like in themselves.

11. Essential Secrets of Psychotherapy: What is the “Shadow”?

Stephen A. Diamond describes how to understand the unconscious dark side of our psyche in this article from “Psychology Today”, April 2012.

12. Return of the Repressed: Is a Mysterious Outbreak of Mass Hysteria Proving Freud Right?

Stephen A. Diamond wonders if recent cases of mass hysteria may be due to the impressive power of the unconscious reasserting itself in an anti-psychodynamic, pharmacologically-indoctrinated climate. From “Psychology Today”, February 2012.

13. Childhood Memories

As part of the “Teaching Clinical Psychology” webpage, John Suler, Rider University, includes this exercise on memories. Students reflect on one or two early childhood memories and answer questions. Good for illustrating aspects of Alfred Adler’s and Sigmund Freud’s theories.

14. Timothy Leary’s Interpersonal Behavior Circle Personal Inventory

This page includes the full 128-item scale as well as scoring instructions for the Leary Interpersonal circumplex model of personality. The model uses the two dimensions of dominant-submissive and love-hate to form 16 categories. Also check out the full text of Leary’s original 1957 paper here.

15. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: Flow, the secret to happiness

Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi asks, “What makes a life worth living?” Noting that money cannot make us happy, he looks to those who find pleasure and lasting satisfaction in activities that bring about a state of “flow” (Runs 18 minutes, 59 seconds).

16. Twins Don’t Share Everything

Scientists have discovered twins show differences in their DNA at birth due to differences in their epigenetics, the molecules that act on genes, according to this article, by Stephen Ornes, in “Science News for Kids”, July 31, 2012.

17. Favorite Link Revisited: Protecting Human Subjects Training

The complete set of three videos is available from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Modules 1 and 2: Evolving Concern: Protection for Human Subjects (22 minutes) and The Belmont Report: Basic Ethical Principles and Their Application (28 minutes); Module 3: Balancing Society’s Mandates: Criteria for Protocol Review (36 minutes)


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 9, May, 2012

May 21, 2012

Hello and welcome to the sixty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,513 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Self-regulation. Willpower. Ego control. Self-control. Call it what you will, but this month we have gathered enough of it to establish a new page devoted to this hot topic. This brings the number of topic pages to 60, which along with our 24 pages on specific theorists covers a lot of personality psychology! Just in case these 84 pages are missing something, we welcome your suggestions of links to include and new topic pages to add.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Sigmund Freud Speaks: The Only Known Recording of His Voice, 1938

Open Culture, ”the best free cultural & educational media on the web”, presents a link to this recording of Freud on for the BBC December 7, 1938. Includes the text of his statement, written in his own handwriting. (runs 1 minutes 57 seconds).

3. BrainFacts.org

The Kavli Foundation, the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, and the Society for Neuroscience, all leading global nonprofit organizations working to advance brain research, created this web site to ” share what neuroscientists know, explore what they don’t yet know fully, and discuss how today’s research advances understanding”. Written for a general audience, the site presents short articles and summaries of current research on the brain and nervous system.

4. TED Radio Hour: The Pursuit of Happiness

NPR and TED talks created this compilation of TED talks on a single topic. For this one, three speakers offer some big ideas for achieving happiness: Barry Schwartz on ”Does having options make us happier? (11:58); Kathyrn Schultz on “Why should we embrace regret?” (17:54); and Malcolm Gladwell on “What does spaghetti sauce have to do with happiness?” (18:44).

5. Obesity and the Biological Clock: When Times Are out of Joint

”Urgent appointments, tight work timetables and hectic social schedules structure modern life, and they very often clash with our intrinsic biological rhythms. The discrepancy results in so-called social jetlag, which can damage one’s health. Among other effects, it can contribute to the development of obesity,” according to a new study published in ”Current Biology” and summarized here in ”ScienceDaily”, May 10, 2012.

6. Lagging at School, the Butt of Cruel Jokes: Are Males the New Second Sex?

According to Elizabeth Day, writing for ”The Observer”, ”They work longer hours, face economic insecurity and suffer worse health. Now their feckless ways are lampooned in the media. A controversial new book argues that men increasingly face a prejudice that dare not speak its name.” Published May 12, 2012.

7. Happiness Model Could Help People Go from Good to Great

”The sayings “variety is the spice of life” and “happiness isn’t getting what you want, but wanting what you get” seem to have a psychological basis, according to” research by Kennon Sheldon and Sonja Lyubomirsky published in ”Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here in ”ScienceDaily”, May 7, 2012.

8. What Happens When We Laugh?

According to neuroscientist Sophie Scott in this TED talk, ”It has to do with breathing … as well as emotions, and the voice. Studying the mechanisms of laughter, she discovered it’s a social, universal expression not just in humans but even chimpanzees and rats. Brain scans revealed the areas of the brain active during laughter (interestingly, similar to yawning, another socially contagious expression). Her lab also examined polite, posed laughter vs. uncontrollable mirth, and revealed how we tell the difference.” (runs 13 minutes and 27 seconds).

9. That Impulsive, Moody Preschooler May Grow Up to Be a Problem Gambler

”Give me the child at 3 and I will give you the adult compulsive gambler. That is the striking finding of a new study” published in ”Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”ScienceDaily”, April 23, 2012.

10. Can You Instill Mental Toughness?

The U.S. military is implementing a resilience-building program designed by Martin Seligman and colleagues to help train personnel to think more optimistically through attributional retraining and to develop the capacities for gratitude and generosity using principles of positive psychology. Read about this work in this article from ”Time” magazine online, April 19, 2012.

11. The Hero’s Journey and Dreams

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #301, April 20, 2012). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Kelly Sullivan Walden about Joseph Campbell’s model of the hero’s journey as it applies to dreams. (1:08:51)

12. Exploring Synchronicity

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #303, May 4, 2012). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Jungian Analyst Dr. Jeffrey Raff about his views and experiences with synchronicity. (1:08:51)

13. Tragic Beauty: The Dark Side of Venus Aphrodite

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #301, May 11, 2012). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Jungian Analyst and mythology scholar Arlene Diane Landau exploring the dark side of the Venus Aphrodite archetype. (1:08:23)

14. To increase willpower should you focus on greater self-control or greater self-compassion?

Recent research summarized here in the ”Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog post by Eric Barker, May 11, 2012, suggests that greater self-compassion will increase motivation.

15. 5 Ways to Easily Increase Self-Control

Eric Barker in his ”Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog post of January 23, 2012, presents this list of things you can do to increase your self-control based on the latest empirical data.

16. What Does Not Kill You Makes You Stronger

Eric Barker in his ”Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog post of May 8, 2012, summarizes research which suggests that this old adage is indeed true, a follow up to his December 16, 2011 post on the same issue.

17. Building Resiliency

Psych Central’s founder and Editor-in-Chief John M. Grohol interviewed therapists Daniel J. Tomasulo, Ph.D. & Marie Hartwell-Walker on how to build resilience. In their original video from May 12, 2012 (which runs 5 minutes, 33 seconds) they offer 5 suggestions and in a follow up from May 21, 2012 (running 4 minutes, 10 seconds) they offer more.

18. Favorite Link Revisited: Case Study: Johnny Carson and the Five Factor Model

I noticed that the obituary of Johnny Carson is filled with personality descriptors making it a useful illustration of the five factor model of personality, personality stability, personality change, and personality coherence. (For the full description of how to utilize this obituary as a case study see Miserandino, M. (2007) Heeeere’s Johnny: A Case Study in the Five Factor Model of Personality, ”Teaching of Psychology, 34(1)”, 37-40. Also see a May 2012 NPR interview with documentary filmmaker Peter Jones on ”Johnny Carson: ‘King Of Late Night,’ A Man Unknown” (runs 9 minutes, 33 seconds).


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 8, April, 2012

April 22, 2012

Hello and welcome to the sixty-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,495 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, we welcome a new site for teachers of psychology: Making Connections. Funded by a grant from the Association for Psychological Science (APS) Fund for Teaching and Public Understanding of Psychological Science, Susan Goldstein established this site ”to provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum.” The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources; pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies; and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues. Check it out at http://makingconnections.redlands.edu.

Also this month, we just discovered — and perhaps you are ahead of us in this — a photo stream on Flickr posted by ”Psychology Pictures”. This stream features graphics of thought-provoking psychology-related quotes printed over striking photos. The result are some very inspiring images that will liven up a slide presentation, a web site, or even your office door. The site also features photos of famous psychologists, should you be looking for one of those.

Finally, for those of you who could use some comic relief at this point in the semester that happens to be personality-related, check out http://make-everything-ok.com/. This ”button” promises to make everything better, but just in case it doesn’t, it urges you to check your perceptions, a good entree into the cognitive perspective with your students.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Making Connections

Susan Goldstein of the University of Redlands established and maintains this site to: ”provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum.” The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources; pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies; and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues.

3. Psychology Pictures Photostream on Flickr

This Flickr photostream features graphics of thought-provoking psychology-related quotes printed over striking photos. The result are some very inspiring images that will liven up a slide presentation, a web site, or even your office door. The site also features photos of famous psychologists.

4. Childhood Adversity Can Lead to Genetic Changes

”Childhood adversity may lead to epigenetic changes in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene, an important regulator of the biological stress response that may increase risk for psychiatric disorders” according to research published in ”PLoS ONE” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, February 29, 2012.

5. Helping Children to Succeed

”Children may perform better in school and feel more confident about themselves if they are told that failure is a normal part of learning, rather than being pressured to succeed at all costs” according to research published in the ”Journal of Experimental Psychology” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, March 13, 2012.

6. Self-Regulation: Video Talk by Roy Baumeister

Roy Baumeister presents this talk to the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, an organization committed to finding innovative practical solutions to today’s social challenges, explaining why ”willpower and self-control is one of the most important aspects of individual and societal wellbeing” (runs 15 minutes and 50 seconds).

7. Carl Jung’s Five Key Elements to Happiness

In 1960, when asked by a journalist, ”What do you consider to be more or less basic factors making for happiness in the human mind?”, Jung identified these five elements.

8. A Jungian Approach to Fairy Tales

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #293, February 3, 2012). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Tom Elsner about fairy tales and their interpretation from a Jungian perspective.

9. The Situation of Ability: Gender Differences in Mental Rotation Deconstructed

In this article by Scott Barry Kaufman from the ”Huffington Post” (1/9/2012) he takes a look at the standard mental rotation task and considers the role of spatial ability, expectations, confidence, and stereotype threat on gender differences in this ability.

10. Revising Your Story

Social psychologist Tim Wilson argues that a better way of changing behavior may be ”to try to get inside [people’s] heads and understand how they see the world—the stories and narratives they tell themselves” according to this article in the American Psychological Association ”Monitor on Psychology”, March 2012, volume 43, number 3, p. 28.

11. Self-Determination Theory: Tips to Keeping New Year’s Resolutions

According to Ed Deci ”the best way to keep on track with your goals for the new year is to think hard about why you’re pursuing them”.

12. The Happy Secret to Better Work

From the website: ”We believe that we should work to be happy, but could that be backwards? In this fast-moving and entertaining talk from TEDxBloomington, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that actually happiness inspires productivity.” (Runs 12 minutes, 21 seconds)

13. Royalty-free Images From the United States Government

Librarians at SUNY Albany put together this list of links to collections of images from the United States Government which may be free to use. They include Federal photo collection, NASA and NOAA images, National Park Service photos and much more (opens in PDF format).

14. Reflections on Carl Rogers

According to the website: ”Digging into the history of psychological science, the Observer has retrieved classic interviews with prominent psychological scientists for an ongoing series Psychology (Yesterday and) Today. Each interview is introduced by a contemporary psychological scientist, and the full text of the interview is available on the Observer website. We invite you to reflect on the words of these legendary scientists, and decide whether their voices still resonate with the science of today.”

15. Exuberance for Novelty Has Benefits

”Novelty-seeking is one of the traits that keeps you healthy and happy and fosters personality growth as you age,” says psychiatrist C. Robert Cloninger, ”It can lead to antisocial behavior … but if you combine this adventurousness and curiosity with persistence … then you get the kind of creativity that benefits society as a whole.”  Read more about novelty-seeking in this article by John Tierney in ”The New York Times”, February 13, 2012.

16. The Strange Tale of Phineas Gage

Joanna Schaffhausen describes the fascinating case of Phineas Gage who had a change in personality as a result of a traumatic brain injury.

17. Eight Ways That Money Can Buy Happiness

Eric Barker summarizes the thinking of Daniel Gilbert on what does and does not make us happy in this list of ways that money, contrary to a popular adage, really can buy us happiness, if spent the right way.

18. Want to Be Happier Right Now? The Think Positive! Experiment

Reflecting on the 3 best events over the course of a week, as opposed to the three worst, colors our overall judgement of how the week was.

19. ”I Love Me!”: A Q&A About Narcissism

Psychotherapist Samuel López De Victoria presents this overview of Narcissism to answer people’s most often asked questions. From ”Psych Central” blog, April 18, 2012.

20. Favorite Link Revisited:

Jonathan Mueller at North Central College, in Naperville, Illinois, put together the extensive website (and newsletter!) Resources for Teaching Social Psychology. Check out his resources for teaching the Self as well as other topics related to both personality psychology and social psychology.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 7, March, 2012

March 20, 2012

Hello and welcome to the sixty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,475 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, ”Psychology Today” online is featuring articles on the topic of Narcissism. They have collected more than two dozen articles about this personality disorder ranging from how to handle Narcissistic bosses, mothers, and politicos to how to recognize (and talk to!) a narcissist. See the Narcissism page on Personality Pedagogy to view more links in addition to the highlighted ones below (http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu/pmwiki/pmwiki.php?n=Topics.Narcissism).

Also new this month, LIFE magazine has released vintage photos of rock stars and their parents. While not exactly the stuff of personality psychology, it is kind of fun to see Elton John and The Jacksons pose with their parents and wonder about their early attachments. This may be an interesting way to pique your students’ interest on attachment theory, (although try not to get too depressed if Elton John and Michael Jackson are all they recognize!).

We are also very excited about a promising new resource: ”Therapy Case Notes”. Psychologist Joseph Burgo discusses events from actual therapy sessions in order to illustrate a particular issue or technique, demystify the therapeutic process, and demonstrate the healing power of talk therapy.

Finally, read about how a simple washing instructions tag found in a pair of men’s pants led to an entire gender debate on Twitter.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. “Give it to Your Woman” Pants’ Care Instructions

A certain brand of men’s trousers, sold by a British clothier, carries the washing instructions “Machine wash . . . or give it to your woman, it’s her job”. This statement caused an outcry on Twitter when first discovered by British technology writer Emma Barnett. Is the label a joke or an insult to women? Let your students be the judge.

3. Therapy Case Notes

Psych Central presents ”Therapy Case Notes” a new blog where Joseph Burgo highlights ”interesting interactions in psychotherapy sessions — things that shed light on a particular issue or dynamic within the therapy session. The purpose is to try and demystify psychotherapy, and demonstrate the powerful healing abilities of the process.”

4. Rock Stars With Their Parents

Photographer John Olson captured this series for LIFE magazine illustrating the home life of rock stars including Elton John and Little Michael Jackson: ”They had fame, reams of money, and fans willing to do wild, unmentionable things just to breathe the same air — but in its September 24, 1971 issue, LIFE illustrated a different side of the lives of rock stars: Just like other mere mortals, it seemed, they often came from humble backgrounds, with moms and dads who bragged about them, fussed over them, called them on their nonsense, and worried about them every single day.”

5. Therapeutic Analysis of Dreams — A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach

Richard Kensinger, of ”Brain Blogger” describes how he uses a cognitive-behavioral approach to conduct dream analyses with patients. In this article he describes the technique and presents the dream and analysis of a college student subject.

6. Genotype-Environment Interaction: Spanking and Genetics May Increase Childhood Aggression

Boys, but not girls, who were exposed to spanking as a disciplinary tactic were at particular risk for aggressive behavior if they have certain genetic risk factors according to research by Boutwell et all (2011), published in ”Aggressive Behavior” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, March 5, 2012.

7. Memories, Dreams, Reflections: A Rare Glimpse Inside Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Mind

Maria Popova, in her ”Brain Pickings” blog provides this overview of Jung’s biography including a sketch note visualization of the book by Austin Kleon. From March 13, 2012.

8. Susan Cain: The Power of Introverts

In February 2012, Susan Cain gave this moving TED talk on the power of introverts (from the website): ”In a culture where being social and outgoing are prized above all else, it can be difficult, even shameful, to be an introvert. But, as Susan Cain argues in this passionate talk, introverts bring extraordinary talents and abilities to the world, and should be encouraged and celebrated.” (runs 19 minutes, 4 seconds).

9. Epigenetics: Childhood Adversity Can Lead to Genetic Changes

According to research published online in ”PloS ONE”, February 2012, ”childhood adversity may lead to epigenetic changes in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene, an important regulator of the biological stress response that may increase risk for psychiatric disorders” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, February 29, 2012.

10. What Personality Traits Do Night Owls Have?

”Morning types are more concrete, logical, introverted and self-controlled. Evening types are more creative, risk-taking, independent and impulsive” according to this brief summary taken from Richard Wiseman’s book “59 Seconds: Change Your Life in Under a Minute”. From the ”Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog by Eric Barker, February 26, 2012.

11. Are Morning People Happier?
http://www.bakadesuyo.com/are-morning-people-happier?

Recent research from ”Emotion” February 2012 and summarized here in the ”Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog by Eric Barker, February 17, 2012, suggests that this is indeed the case.

12. How To Spot A Narcissist

The paradox of narcissism is ”If narcissists were just jerks, they would be easy to avoid. The fact that they are entertaining and exciting as well as aggressive and manipulative makes them compelling in the real world and as subjects of psychological scrutiny.” This, according to Scott Barry Kaufman for ”Psychology Today”, (published on July 5, 2011 – last reviewed on March 2, 2012).

13. Talking to a Narcissist

”We all know narcissistic people and that can make for unsatisfactory interactions. Psychotherapist Bill Snow has come up with seven rules for talking to a narcissist that are offered as straight advice but sound like a parody.” By Nigel Barber, for ”Psychology Today”, February 29, 2012.

14. Higher Rate of Narcissism for Those Born After 1982?

A brief summary of research by Twenge et al. (2007) finding a steady increase in the rate of narcissism in American college students from 1982 to 2006. By Stephanie Sarkis, for ”Psychology Today”, March 4, 2012.

15. The Healthy Side of Narcissism

Despite the problems with being narcissistic, some have suggested that it’s okay to be a little narcissistic. ”There are reasons to believe that having the right amount of adaptive narcissism may be particularly adaptive in helping people maintain healthy habits.” By Susan Krauss Whitbourne for ”Psychology Today”, January 24, 2012.

16. Are Narcissists Everywhere? In a Word . . . YES!

Between the internet, TV stars, professional athletes, and more, our society encourages and rewards narcissistic behavior. According to some, ”We live in the “Me Decade” on steroids!”. By Thomas G. Plante for ”Psychology Today”, March 6, 2012.

17. The Narcissist’s Dilemma: They Can Dish It out, But . . .

”When criticized, narcissists show themselves woefully incapable of retaining any emotional poise, or receptivity. And it really doesn’t much matter whether the nature of that criticism is constructive or destructive. They just don’t seem to be able to take criticism, period. At the same time, these disturbed individuals demonstrate an abnormally developed capacity to criticize others (as in, “dish it out” to them).” By Leon F. Seltzer for ”Psychology Today”, October 12, 2011.

18. A Day In The Life of a Narcissist

”Psychology Today” writer Susan Krauss Whitbourne outlines the characteristics that define narcissism, how it changes over the lifespan, and the problematic behavior narcissists consistently engage in. Published September 13, 2011.

19. Behind the Facade: The ”False Self” of the Narcissist

To compensate for a true sense of self, narcissists develop a ”false self” according to Randi Kreger for ”Psychology Today”, November 28, 2011.

20. Narcissism: Why it’s So Rampant in Politics

According to Leon F. Seltzer for ”Psychology Today”, narcissistic politicians ”don’t serve the people; they serve themselves.” Published December 21, 2011.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: Narcissism Among Celebrities, on Facebook and in Shakespeare

From the website: ”Are celebrities really more narcissistic than you are? Is your Facebook page telling the world that you are a narcissist? And finally: who is Shakespeare’s most narcissistic character? I’ll give you a hint: the character can be found in Twelfth Night. So if you’re looking for more information about the Narcissistic Personality Disorder, or just everyday narcissism, as well as examples of famous narcissists, you’ll find it in this in this episode of The Psych Files”. (Episode 110; Originally released November 22, 2009).


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 3, November, 2011

November 30, 2011

Hello and welcome to the sixty-third Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,348 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we feature four links on Narcissism, including one of our favorite links revisited. In this issue you’ll also find links related to the five factors, genetics, gender, and Facebook friends and the brain! All in all, an issue sure to spark your and your students’ interest in the latest research findings in personality.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Searching for Meaning

Existential-humanistic psychologists hope to promote the idea that therapy can change not only minds but lives. By Michael Price, from the APA ”Monitor”, November 2011, 42(10), print version p. 58.

3. Those With A Sweet Tooth Usually Have a Sweeter Personality

”People who have a preference for eating sweet things tend to have sweeter dispositions [higher in Agreeableness] and are more likely to help people in need, compared to those who opt for savory foods or nothing at all, researchers from North Dakota State University and Gettysburg College reported in the ”Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” ” and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, October 12, 2011.

4. Facebook Friends Predicted by Size of Brain Structures

Brain regions associated with creating memories of names and faces and interpretation of social cues appear to be larger in people who have more friends on Facebook according to research by Geraint Rees published in the ”Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences” and summarized here in ”LifeScience”, October 18, 2011.

5. Personality Plays Role in Body Weight

People who are high in Neuroticism and low in Conscientiousness are more likely than others to go through cycles of gaining and losing weight throughout their lives according to research by Angelina Sutin and Luigi Ferrucci published in the ”Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” and summarized here.

6. Don’t Worry, Be Happy: Understanding Mindfulness Meditation

Mindfulness meditation may be particularly powerful because it draws on attention regulation, body awareness, emotion regulation and sense of self according to research by Britta Holzel published in Perspectives on Psychological Science and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, October 31, 2011.

7. At What Age Do Girls Prefer Pink?

According to research by Vannessa LoBue and Judy DeLoache, children’s color preferences — and aversions — emerge between the ages of 2 and 3 just as they are beginning to be aware of gender. Their research was published in the ”Journal of Developmental Psychology,” September 2011, and is summarized here in The British Psychological Society ”Research Digest”, September 5, 2011.

8. NPR: Radio Diaries

The NPR project Radio Diaries encourages teenagers, seniors, prison inmates and others whose voices are rarely heard to document their lives for public radio. Their stories are often powerful, surprising, intimate, and timeless, illustrating many aspects of the self, including self-concept, self-esteem, and social identity.

9. McDonald’s Advertisements and Culture: ”I’m Loving It”
The McDonald’s famous ”I’m Loving it” campaign looks different, depending on the culture in which the ad is targeted. For example, in India the ad features more collectivistic values: A father and son share a bonding moment. In the individualistic United States, the ads most often feature a person alone. Würtz (2005) explains all about cultural differences and advertisements and this companion website includes many illustrations of McDonald’s Ads from China, Japan, India, and the United States.

10. When It’s Good To Be Bad

Acknowledging our Jungian shadow can help us become more creative according to Susan O’Doherty in this article from ”Psychology Today”, October 16, 2009.

11.Happiness Depends On Who You Know and Your Goals, Study of College Students Suggests

Introverted and extroverted college students use different strategies to be happy according to research by Bernardo Carducci and colleagues and summarized in ”ScienceDaily”, August 30, 2011.

12. Parents’ Stress Leaves Lasting Marks on Children’s Genes

”Researchers at the University of British Columbia and the Child & Family Research Institute have shown that parental stress during their children’s early years can leave an imprint on their sons’ or daughters’ genes — an imprint that lasts into adolescence and may affect how these genes are expressed later in life” according to research published in ”Child Development” and summarized here in ”ScienceDaily”, August 30, 2011.

13. Is Culture Behind Men’s Better Spatial Reasoning?

New research by Moshe Hoffman, Uri Gneezy and John List suggests that the gender gap in spatial skills maybe be partially due to culture according to research published in the ”Proceedings of the National Academy of Science” and summarized here in ”Discover Magazine” online, 2011.

14. Parents Need An Attitude Adjustment to Improve Their Children’s Homework Motivation

”Parents who want to improve their child’s motivation to complete homework this school year need to change their own attitude and behavior,” providing more structure to improve children’s perceived competence and feelings of warmth to increase perceived relatedness.

15. The Incredibly Seductive Pull of a Very Skilled Narcissist

Psychologist Samuel Lopez De Victoria discusses 7 characteristics which can make a narcissist both appealing and dangerous to others including charm, storytelling ability, believability, wisdom, acting ability and others.

16. Narcissists’ Overconfidence May Hide Low Self-Esteem

”Narcissists may seem to love themselves, but a new study finds that narcissistic self-aggrandizement may hide deep feelings of inferiority” according to research by Erin Myers as published in the ”Journal of Research in Personality” and summarized here in ”LiveScience”, October 20, 2011.

17. Narcissists Already Know What You Think of Them, But Do They Care?

Research suggests that narcissists know that others do not share their inflated self-view and think they have a problem but they often choose to do nothing about it. This suggests that narcissism is a character disorder rather than a personality disorder according to this summary by David DiSalvo for the ”Psychology Today” Neuronarrative blog, October 31, 2011.

18. Favorite Link Revisited: Is Your Boss a Narcissist?

According to research by Amy Brunell and colleagues published in ”Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin”, December, 2008, and briefly summarized here, chances are he or she is.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 6, Number 1, September, 2011

September 23, 2011

Hello and welcome to the sixty-first Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,302 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy Birthday to the Personality Pedagogy newsletter! This month we are starting our 6th year. We have enjoyed brining you the latest in news, assignments, activities, examples and more. We thank you, our loyal readers and visitors, for making Personality Pedagogy the place to go for resources for teaching personality psychology. Don’t you feel like sending us a birthday card now? (see the third link below)

Science or science fiction? One of the most interesting pieces of news this month is a new study out of UC Berkeley which was able to reconstruct the ”movies” inside of our heads — like dreams and memories — from fMRIs and computer modeling. This is a very exciting breakthrough and one that, while not directly related to personality psychology, illustrates cutting-edge research in neuroscience these days. It is just a matter of time before this technique will be used to study personality and the brain.

Permit us a moment of shameless self-promotion. This month we are pleased to announce a new textbook for personality psychology written by our own editor, Marianne Miserandino. ”Personality Psychology: Foundations and Findings” (Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2012) introduces students to the basic foundations and latest findings in personality psychology by presenting the fundamental questions, accumulated knowledge, and latest research in traits, genetics, neuroscience, self and identity, intrapsychic aspects, regulation and motivation, and cognition, as well as the integration across these areas. The book is written specifically for students at small liberal arts and community colleges. The best part of all is that Miserandino wrote the instructor’s manual too! The IM is chock full of discussion points, active learning exercises, self-assessments, crossword puzzle vocabulary reviews, and much more gleaned from her almost 20 years of teaching personality psychology at Arcadia University. If you like Personality Pedagogy, you are sure to love this new approach to teaching personality psychology. Check it out here.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Scientists Use fMRI to Reveal the Movies in Our Mind

Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and computational models, UC Berkeley researchers Jack Gallant and colleagues have succeeded in decoding and reconstructing people’s dynamic visual experiences – in this case, watching Hollywood movie trailers, according to this summary and published September 22 2011 in the journal ”Current Biology”. Includes excerpts from the actual movies participants viewed alongside images recreated from their brain scans.

3. The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook

Mike Masnick discusses an ”experiment” conducted by David Plotz of ”Slate” magazine. Plotz noted that well-wishers responded automatically when they saw that a friend was having a birthday on Facebook.

4. Bobby McFerrin’s ”Don’t Worry, Be Happy”: An Explication Grounded in Research

Maria Popova presents this explication of the ”iconic happiness anthem” grounded in the latest research in personality and social psychology. Includes links to original sources.

5. The Use of Active Imagination in Jungian Sandplay

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #278, September 9, 2011). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Maria Hess, Ph.D., a Jungian Analyst who teaches Sonoma State University. Maria teaches, practices and presents workshops in sandplay and other non-verbal expressive modalities.

6. Carl Jung: Psychology’s Magician

According to Algis Valiunas, in ”The New Atlantis”, ”… Newton was not the last magician. Jung was. The method of his analytical psychology — as he called it, to distinguish it from Freudian psychoanalysis — was nothing short of fantastic.” [For example] ”[t]o penetrate the psyche of a woman destined for schizophrenic disintegration, he would study dreams, reveries, her ”borderland phenomena” — the apparitions that came to her as she was half-asleep — and explicate them in the light of Mithraic religious symbols, Old Testament wisdom, the words of Jesus, passages from Shakespeare, poems by Nietzsche, Teutonic and Persian and Chinese and Indian legend… Although Jung focuses intently on a particular patient with a particular disorder, his study has a far more extensive cultural reach. He was out to dethrone arid modern scientism and restore the symbolic imagination — which is to say, religious feeling — to its rightful place in the life of men.”

7. Contingencies of Self-Worth Scale

From Crocker, J., Luhtanen, R. K., Cooper, M. L., & Bouvrette, A. (2003). Contingencies of self-worth in college students: Theory and measurement. ”Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85”, 894-908. Includes background information, limitations, scale validity, scoring instructions and links to the scale in English, Japanese, Spanish, German, Dutch, French, and Turkish.

8. Wounded Warriors Softball Team

NBC Nightly News did this feature story on the inspirational Wounded Warriors softball team. These veteran service members play on an amputee softball team, made up entirely of players who have lost limbs. They take on able-bodied teams for camaraderie and the love of good hard competition. Aired September 5, 2011 (Runs 3 minutes and 28 seconds).

9. Nonexperimental Methods

Mark Mitchell, Clarion University, provides this extensive overview of nonexperimental methods including quizzes to test your comprehension of the material presented.

10. Core Concepts in Neuroscience

The Society for Neuroscience sponsors this extensive website filled with useful and up-to-date resources including a downloadable e-book on the core concepts of neuroscience and a matching Powerpoint presentation.

11. Neuroscience Education Resources Virtual Encycloportal (NERVE)

The Society for Neuroscience sponsors the website NERVE, the Neuroscience Education Resources Virtual Encycloportal. Built for instructors of k-12, the site is organized around the themes of addictions, drugs, and the brain; anatomy; cells; sensation, perception and movement; mental health, brain disorders, and disease; nervous system injuries; brain basics; and neuroscientists at work. Filled with activities, cases, fact sheets, images, experiences, quizzes, simulations and much more, many of which are easily tailored to the level of high school and college audiences.

12. Finding Little Albert

Michael Britt created an episode for his podcast, ”The Psych Files,” which discusses the curious story of how Little Albert, one of the most famous subjects in the history of psychology, was finally found. In this video episode (#114) Britt takes us through each step of the extensive and fascinating detective work which led to Albert’s identity. Includes some never seen before pictures.

13. The Little Albert Study: What You Know is Mostly Wrong

Michael Britt created an episode for his podcast, ”The Psych Files,” which discusses the real story behind Little Albert, one of the most famous subjects in the history of psychology. In this episode (#47) Britt explains, ”If you think you know a lot about the little Albert experiment conducted by John Watson? Well, guess what – you’d be surprised at how much of the story is simply not true. If you’re wondering whatever happened to little Albert, whether the little Albert study created a lasting phobia in a small boy, or even what place this story has in the history of behaviorism, then I suggest you take a listen to this episode of The Psych Files and get the facts on this fascinating part of psychology’s history.”

14. Twins

In August 1997 the magazine ”Psychology Today” ran this summary of twin research and the misperceptions of twin research written by twin researcher Nancy Segal and colleagues.

15. Celebrating Diversity in Schools

Celebrating Diversity in Schools provides a range of resources for teachers, parents and others who work with young people to help make schools more supportive and inclusive for same sex attracted and transgender young people and staff. Their website contains training resources, materials, activities, handouts, references and more.

16. Sexual Trichotomy: Understanding the Fluidity of Sexuality and Gender

One of the many activities featured on the Celebrating Diversity website is this trichotomy of sexual identity, sexual behavior, and sexual orientation. Students discuss how this trichotomy might apply to 6 hypothetical people and in the process discover how sexuality is fluid and how a person’s identity, orientation and behavior can change throughout life.

17. Heterosexual Privilege

The Student Counseling Center at Texas Tech University features a number of activities, handouts and other resources on their website. In this activity, students answer 32 questions that illustrate heterosexual privilege in ways straight people do not have to think about. For example, questions range from ”I can, if I wish, legally marry my life partner” to ”My sexual orientation is represented in the media and I don’t feel excluded”.

18. Assessing Assumptions About Gender

This exercise by Amy Taylor won Honorable Mention for the 2009 Social Psychology Network Action Teaching Award. In this activity, students read a dialog between a man and a woman and report their impressions of the characters. Half the class have the genders of the characters switched. According to Taylor, the objectives of this activity are to: (1) illustrate how subtle gender biases can influence social perceptions, (2) help students recognize their own implicit assumptions about gender, and (3) explore the implications these biases may have for gender equality.

19. Teach Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website as a companion to their Learn.Genetics website. Here you will find classroom activities to teach the basics of heritable traits and take-home activities to help students share what they’ve learned with their families. PDFs are available for download including instructions, student worksheets, overhead masters, and answer keys. Some of the material may be too basic for a college class (although the graphics which review the basics of inheritance would make an excellent review), the topics do include Epigenetics, gene therapy, personalized medicine, cloning, and other fairly sophisticated topics. Most of the activities can be modified to fit the needs of your students and the topic of personality.

For example, there is an activity to create a DNA recipe to create dog by randomly selecting strips of paper that represent DNA. Though the activity is recommended for grades 5-10 some of the advanced discussion points are applicable, or at least a good review for a personality psychology class. The ”Your Environment, Your Epigenome” activity, where students record some of the epigenome-influencing factors present in their environment, is suitable for high school and college classes.

20. Learn Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website to disseminate educational materials on genetics, bioscience, and health. Includes animations to teach the basics of DNA, genes, heredity and traits, and more.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: Jung Speaks

PsicoMundo, a Spanish language website about psychoanalysis, has two audio clips in their Galería de Sonidos (Gallery of Sounds) of Carl Jung speaking (the clips are in English). Fragmento 1 (Fragment 1) is 16 seconds, Fragmento 2 (Fragment 2) is 23 seconds. They are available for listening (para escuchar) on line or off line.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 10, June, 2011

June 21, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,256 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy Birthday to Personality Pedagogy! Five years ago this month we started a little wiki mostly to have a repository of all the cool and useful links we needed for our personalty class . . . and now we’ve become the top place on the web for resources for the teaching of personality psychology. We thank you, our loyal readers from all over the world, for your continued support and look forward to many more happy years.

This month, in the spirit of a good circus, we have ”a little something for everyone” as the great showman P. T. Barnum used to say. From evolution to the sensitivity, to longevity and brain myths, we have it all this month — including some videos illustrating the Barnum Effect.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. This is Psychology

The American Psychological Association presents this series of brief videos illustrating how psychological research can be applied to a broad range of issues and challenges such as bullying, children’s mental health, and other issues of concern to the general public.

3. The Secret to Longevity: It’s About Character, Not Just Calisthenics

Science writer Melanie A. Greenberg summarizes the results of Howard Friedman and Leslie Martin’s reanalysis of the Terman data identifying the psychosocial predictors of longevity, including strong social ties. From ”Psychology Today”, April 8, 2011.

4. Top Ten Myths About the Brain

Smithsonian.com asks ”When it comes to this complex, mysterious, fascinating organ, what do — and don’t — we know?” in this article by Laura Helmuth published May 20, 2011.

5. Women Warriors Show Resilience Similar to Men, Psychological Study Shows

”Women service members who experience combat are apparently as resilient as the men they serve alongside, according to a study” by Dawne Vogt and colleagues and summarized in ”Science Daily”, June 7, 2011.

6. When Did Girls Start Wearing Pink?

According to Smithsonian.com writer Jeanne Maglaty, ”every generation brings a new definition of masculinity and femininity that manifests itself in children’s dress”. Read about the vicissitudes of gender-appropriate clothing and color and check out the fascinating slide show of examples. Originally posted April 8, 2011.

7. Hi, My Name’s Sarah And I’m An ENTP

Sarah explains what it’s like to find out her Myers-Briggs Type Indicator scores and her interpretation of them in this blog entry from ”3 Daily Quarks”, June 6, 2011.

8. What is Evolutionary Psychology?

Daniel J. Kruger, makes his book Kruger, D.J. (2002). ”What is Evolutionary Psychology?” (Ann Arbor, MI: Altralogical Press) available online. Topics include adaptation, inclusive fitness, kin selection, altruism, sexual selection, parental investment, and more.

9. Viktor Frankl on Behaviorism

Frankl discusses his theory of logotherapy and Skinner’s theory of behaviorism and the impact of each on human behavior. Excerpted from a longer film (6 minutes, 46 seconds).

10. BIS, BAS and the Highly Sensitive Person

Summarizes theory and research on the BIS and the BAS and how these two systems may account for the experience of people who are particularly sensitive to sensory input.

11. The Highly Sensitive Person: A Self-test

Based on the work of Elaine Aron, this self-test helps people to see if they are one of the 15-20% of the population who are particularly sensitive to sensory input related to BAS and BIS functioning.

12. James Randi Explains the Art of Cold Reading

Alleged psychics use the cold reading to impress an audience and gain their trust. However, when put to the test, as skeptic, magician, and challenger of paranormal claims James Randi has done, their abilities are more art than science.

13. The Barnum Effect

John Stossel, co-anchor of the ABC news program 20/20, questions the accuracy of astrology, and amazes an audience with a demonstration of how false astrology readings are believable when they include general statements that could apply to anybody (2 minutes, 24 seconds).

14. Derren Brown on Astrology

The British illusionist, mentalist, and skeptic Derren Brown conducts a demonstration with audiences in the UK, US, and Spain, to illustrate how the Barnum Effect can lead people to believe psychic readings (8 minutes, 24 seconds).

15. The Cold Reading Technique

Denis Dutton explains the cold reading technique, the Barnum Effect, and analyzes a spirit medium’s performance, in this paper originally printed in (1988) ”Experientia”, Volume 44, 326-332.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: The Barnum Effect

An online personality test which gives false, but easily believable feedback, using the Barnum Effect. Take this test to remind yourself why good personality tests should provide specific feedback…and why horoscopes are so much fun!


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 1, September, 2010

September 24, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 1, September, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,122 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

The big news for this month is that we are celebrating the 4th anniversary of this newsletter. In that time, our mailing list has grown to nearly 200 subscribers and even more read us online at our newsletter archive blog (https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/). We thank you all for making us one of your favorite places on the web to find materials for teaching personality psychology.

This month, we found a cute, if questionable study, conducted by a 17-year old winner of a BBC contest. Perhaps her survey of exploring why people choose their Facebook profile photos will inspire your students to conduct studies of their own.

Speaking of Facebook, thanks to John Rust, director of the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University who called our attention to the work of the institute. They have been collecting personality data from over 2 million (!) users of Facebook and will gladly collaborate with other researchers, including grads and undergrads, on research projects related to their dataset. Check out their site below.

If you have a suggestion of an article, summary, exercise, video or anything which you think may be helpful to others, please drop us an e-mail. This month we thank Jon Mueller, John Rust, and two anonymous commenters on our newsletter archive for their suggestions.

Alas, it has come to our attention that the link for signing up for our newsletter has been having problems since July. We apologize for the inconvenience this may have caused potential subscribers. We think we have the problem solved, but just in case, just drop us an e-mail and we can add you to our mailing list ”by hand”.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the top right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Psychometrics Centre

The University of Cambridge Psychometrics Centre conducts research on personality including the five factor model, life satisfaction, self-monitoring, and other constructs collecting data via  Facebook application. They are willing to collaborate and share their data with other researchers (including grads and undergrads) who have ideas for projects. Find out more about their work (including a list of research ideas for students) by visiting MyPersonalityWiki.

2. Rebuilding Maslow’s Pyramid on an Evolutionary Foundation

In focusing on motives and self-actualization, Abraham Maslow may have missed out on key ideas from neuroscience, developmental biology, and evolutionary psychology according to Douglas Kenrick a in a paper published in ”Psychological Science”. He summarizes his view in this blog entry for ”Psychology Today”, May 19, 2010 (See link to original paper below).

3.  Self-Actualization: Parenthood?

Douglas Kenrick and his co-authors redefine Maslow’s concept of self-actualization as ”an indirect means to attracting a mate and, ultimately, parenting children”. Read about the controversy surrounding this redefinition in this ”New York Times” article by Lisa Belkin, September 10, 2010. (Remember, access to articles in the ”New York Times” is free, but you must sign up for a subscription).

4. Kenrick, Griskevicius, Neuberg & Schaller (2010)

Kenrick, D.T., Griskevicius, V., Neuberg, S.L., & Schaller, M. (2010). Renovating the pyramid of needs: Contemporary extensions built upon ancient foundations. ”Perspectives on Psychological Science”, 5, 292-314. (Opens in PDF).

5. What Does Your Facebook Profile Picture Say About You?

As one of the finalists of the BBC Radio 4’s “So You Want to Be a Scientist?” project 17-year old Nina Jones conducted a survey of Facebook users and identified the interesting ways in which people used their photos as a form of self-presentation.

6. Personality Predicts Cheating More Than Academic Struggles

According to research by Delroy Paulhus and colleagues published in the ”Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied” and summarized here, ”College students who admitted to cheating in high school or turned in plagiarized papers ranked high on personality tests of the so-called Dark Triad: psychopathy, Machiavellianism (cynicism, amorality, manipulativeness), and narcissism (arrogance and self-centeredness, with a strong sense of entitlement). Of the three dark personality types, psychopathy was most strongly linked to cheating”. From ”Science Daily”, September 8, 2010.

7. Designing Your Own Workspace Improves Health, Happiness and Productivity

”Employees who have control over the design and layout of their workspace are not only happier and healthier — they’re also up to 32% more productive” according to research by Craig Knight at the University of Exeter and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, September 8, 2010.

8. Childhood Personality Traits Predict Adult Behavior: We Remain Recognizably the Same Person, Study Suggests

”Using data from a 1960s study of approximately 2,400 ethnically diverse elementary schoolchildren in Hawaii, researchers compared teacher personality ratings of the students with videotaped interviews of 144 of those individuals 40 years later […] Personality traits observed in childhood are a strong predictor of adult behavior” according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside, the Oregon Research Institute and University of Oregon and summarized in this article from ”Science Daily”, August 5, 2010.

9. Stories of the Middle Passage

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology Talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #244, August 19 2010). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Jungian analysis James Hollis as he describes the theory of Carl Jung, especially as it pertains to the second half of life (middle age and beyond) (runs 1 hour, 3 minutes, and 35 seconds).

10. Economic Status, Genetics, Together Influence Psychopathic Traits

”Researchers studying the genetic roots of antisocial behavior report that children with one variant of a serotonin transporter gene are more likely to exhibit psychopathic traits if they also grow up poor” according to research by Edelyn Verona and colleagues, published in the ”Journal of Abnormal Psychology” and summarized in this article from Science Daily, August 7, 2010.

11. ABC Model That is the Central Basis of REBT

In this essay, therapist Stacey McCall reviews her use of Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy with a 17-year old male client. Posted September 4, 2010, on the Creativity and Conflict Blog.

12. What Clients Think CBT Will Be Like and How It Really Is

”People expect cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to be more prescriptive than it is, and therapists to be more controlling than they really are. That’s according to a series of interviews with 18 clients who undertook 8 sessions (14 hours) of CBT to help with their diagnosis of generalised anxiety disorder” according to research by H. Westra and colleagues published in Psychotherapy Research and summarized here.

13. My Life In Therapy

Writer Daphne Merkin, who struggles with chronic depression, describes her experiences with psychotherapy which started when she was 10 years old.

14. Feeling Angry or Guilty? Maybe It’s Time to Stop “Shoulding!”

Therapist Clifford Lazarus argues that living under self-imposed “should, oughts, and musts” creates anger and guilt which makes life miserable for themselves and those around them.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 11, July, 2010

July 28, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 11, July, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and the approximately 2,107 other interesting links related to personality, please visit Personality Pedagogy:

Anybody going to APA next month? We are! If you happen to see Marianne at a Division Two: Society for the Teaching of Psychology event, please introduce yourself and say hi.

This month we found some very interesting links on bioethics — ethical issues raised by scientific findings in genetics, neuroscience, and other biological fields. Thanks to reader/visitor Nathan Grimm for pointing this out to us. We also catch up on podcasts with Dr. Dave on Jung’s Red Book, and meditation and the brain. Perhaps, my favorite link this month is the site with web apps for the 21st century, with links to just about any tool you could imagine and many, many, which I’ll bet you never knew you needed.

We also are clearing out our inbox and (finally!) adding links that have been mentioned by folks on the PsychTeacher discussion list in recent and not-too-recent months. One of the best is a compilation of over 600 happy songs. Think of it as your soundtrack to a happy rest-of-the-summer!

I guess I better end this introduction here before you discover my personality profile on the Five Factor Model from my writing (see link below)!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the top right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino at arcadia dot edu

1. A Guide to Bioethics Resources on the Web

Advances in biology, technology, and medicine raise new ethical questions, about human dignity and the rights of individuals especially when it comes to end-of-life care, organ transplants, abortion, euthanasia, animal rights, population control, genomics and other topics. Nathan Grimm compiled this extensive list of resources for teaching and learning about bioethics including sites in Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe, and the United Kingdom.

2. Psychopharmacology and the Self

From the website: ”The development of psychotropic drugs has stimulated a renewed interest in questions about what constitutes “the self” and one’s personality. Does an authentic, static, and incorrigible self exist? Do antidepressants alter, enhance, or corrupt the authentic self? Is cognitive enhancement possible and desirable, and if so, is it ethical?” This module, prepared by the High School Bioethics Project at the University of Pennsylvania, takes students and teachers on an exploration of the impact of psychotropic drugs on our understanding of the self, including the use of stimulants such as Ritalin and Adderall, drugs often used by students as study aids. Includes a downloadable pdf filled with group projects, individual activities, teacher-directed classroom discussion, case study, and references. Written for high school students, much of the information can be revised for use in some college classes.

3. Neuroethics Curriculum module

From the website: ”Although bioethics has been around for more than four decades, the field of neuroethics is in its infancy. Philosophers have developed several conceptual frameworks that contain valuable insights concerning the analysis of questions of right and wrong, good and bad. These ethical theories can help us as we struggle with the moral dilemmas presented to us by advances in brain science.” Includes a downloadable pdf filled with group projects, individual activities, teacher-directed classroom discussion, case study, and references. Written for high school students, much of the information can be revised for use in some college classes.

4. Psychology Today Genetic Crossroads Blog: An ”Inborn Talent Genetic Test”? Unlikely.

For Jesse Reynolds, Project Director on Biotechnology Accountability at the Center for Genetics and Society, one test captures much of what’s wrong with personal genetics testing. Read his view here, which includes links to some controversial uses of genetic testing like genetic testing in China, Berkeley’s testing of incoming freshmen, and the Food and Drug Administration’s halting of genomic test kits in Walgreens.

5. Your Family ”Type” Can Affect Your Kids At School

The way a family interacts at home can affect how kids do in school, a study suggests today in the journal ”Child Development” by Melissa Sturge-Apple and colleagues and summarized in this article from ”USA Today”, July 14, 2010. The researchers identified three kinds of families: cohesive, disengaged, and enmeshed families. Children from disengaged families started school with the most problems, showing aggressive behavior and trouble cooperating. Children from enmeshed families entered school without problems, but later developed anxiety, loneliness, and alienation. On average, children from cohesive families showed the fewest problems.

6. The Meditating Brain With Richard Davidson

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #231, February 26, 2010). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Richard J. Davidson, Research Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry and Director of the W.M. Keck Laboratory for Functional Brain Imaging and Behavior, the Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience and the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison about the impact of meditation on the brain.

7. The Red Book of C. G. Jung with Nancy Furlotti

Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast; Show #231, February 26, 2010). In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Jungian Analyst and past president of the Jung Institute of Los Angeles, Nancy Furlotti about the recently-published ”Red Book” of Carl Jung, which she was instrumental in helping to publish. In this book, Jung describes his own experience with the unconscious and the individuation process towards greater wholeness as reflected in mythological symbols.

8. Web 2.0/21st Century Tools

This site provides links and reviews of web tools for educators including audio file management, bookmarking, charts/graphs, digital art, digital storytelling, file conversion, file sharing, photo editing, presentation/slideshow, project management, search engines, social networks, survey/polls, timelines, webQuests, word processing, video/screencasting and more. Most of the sites are open source and free.

9. The Links Between Bloggers’ Personalities and Their Use of Words

According to a content analysis of 694 blogs by Tal Yarkoni, people use different words depending on their personality. ”More neurotic bloggers used more words associated with negative emotions; extravert bloggers used more words pertaining to positive emotions; high scorers on agreeableness avoided swear words and used more words related to communality; and conscientious bloggers mentioned more words with achievement connotations.” This summary from the ”British Psychological Society’s Research Digest Blog”, July 12, 2010, original article published as: Yarkoni, T. (2010). Personality in 100,000 Words: A large-scale analysis of personality and word use among bloggers. ”Journal of Research in Personality, 44 (3)”, 363-373

10. Identical Strangers Explore Nature vs. Nature

Paula Bernstein and Elyse Schein were identical twins who were separated at birth and met 35 years later as identical strangers. In the course of researching the history of their birth and adoption, they discovered that they were part of a secret research project in which identical twins, particularly those of mothers with mental illness, were raised separately to asses the relative influence of nature and nurture. This NPR story describing their amazing story includes a photo gallery of the twins growing up. Based on their book ”Identical Strangers” (Random House, 2007). From ”All Things Considered”, NPR, October 25, 2007.

11. Letters from African-American Women

”The Duke University Libraries has had a long-standing reputation for their digitization projects, and this collection is certainly one of their best. This particular segment of their work focuses on the lives of African-American women, and it contains the full-text memories of Elizabeth Johnson Harris, slave letters from Hannah Valentine, and a rather unusual stand-alone letter from Vilet Lester. Hannah Valentine was born in 1867 to former slaves, and visitors can read her 85-page handwritten memoir here. In her memoir, she talks about the importance of religion in her life, and there are also a few poems by her as well. The letters from Hannah Valentine, a house slave, reveal a rare firsthand glimpse into the lives of slaves in Virginia. Finally, the very unique letter from Vilet Lester offers just a slight, but revealing glimpse, into her life in Bullock County, Georgia in 1857. [KMG]” (Copyright 2010 Internet Scout Project – http://scout.wisc.edu The Internet Scout Project, located in the Computer Sciences Department at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, provides Internet publications and software to the research and education communities under grants from the National Science Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon foundation, and other philanthropic organizations. Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of any of our publications or web content provided this paragraph, including the above copyright notice, is preserved on all copies.)

12. Erik Erikson’s 8-Stages Hoedown

Undergraduate Matthew Volkmann made this video for his Ed Psych class at the University of Iowa. In it, he describes Erikson’s stages of identity development. The video runs 5 minutes, 20 seconds and starts with a loud scream. P.S. Matthew proudly reports that he got an A on this project!

13. Harry Harlow Studies on Isolation in Monkeys

Excerpt from a movie on attachment showing how newborn baby monkeys, separated from their mothers, when given a choice between a cold wire mother with milk or a soft mother without, chose comfort over food. Early separation led to social problems as these monkeys grew up, demonstrating the importance of contact with a caregiver.
(1 minute, 11 seconds)

14. 7 TAT Cards 7

While this blogger suggests that we use these images for a writing assignment, astute visitors will recognize these as cards from the original Thematic Apperception Test by Henry A. Murray and Christiana D. Morgan.

15. Positive Psychology of Music – Over 600 Positive Songs

According to John Schinnerer, on his ”Guide To Self” website, ”Music has a powerful and profound impact on how we feel and think. If we are to approach Dacher Keltner & Barbara Fredrickson’s 3:1 Positivity ratio (3 times as much positive emotions as negative), we must surround ourselves with positive messages, planting tiny seeds throughout each day. This is a list of over 600 positive and elevating songs (in terms of tempo, lyrics, and/or timbre) compiled by Dr. John Schinnerer. June 2009.” Opens directly in PDF format.