Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 10, Number 1, September 2015

September 30, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,221 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you know that September 18 was “Jeans for Genes Day”, a campaign by this British charity to raise awareness of genetic disorders? As part of their educational campaign, they started a web page loaded with information and resources for teachers about genetics and genetic disorders. To celebrate with them, check out the links below and our Favorite Link Revisited.

Presidential hopefuls are often subject to name calling in the press, but have you heard about Donald Trump as “Narrcissist-in-Chief”? A touch of narcissism may actually be a helpful trait for the U.S. President…or at least a presidential hopeful according to research reviewed in the New York Times (see link below).

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Raising Awareness of Genetic Disorders: Jeans for Genes Day

As part of their mission, Jeans for Genes Day, which raises awareness of genetic disorders and money for people with genetic disorders, created “five minute films that are narrated by children who are either affected by a genetic disorder themselves or have an affected sibling. Each film is accompanied by a teacher fact sheet and a number of resources that can be used in the classroom.”

3. Six creative ways to teach genetics

A selection of creative ways to help students of all ages and abilities understand genes and genetic disorders. From “The Guardian”, September 7, 2015.

4. Your Family Health History: A DNA Day Activity

This PDF describes how to create a family tree or pedigree documenting medical conditions which may run in families, but you can easily adapt the activity to focus on personality traits.

5. Science says these 2 personality traits predict whether you’ll be a successful leader

“Every organization, from Apple and Google to the US government, demands different skills and personal qualities in its leadership. But research suggests there are two traits that are common to the majority of successful leaders: extroversion and conscientiousness”. According to a meta-analysis by Timothy Judge and colleagues as summarized here for “Business Insider”, July 14, 2015.

6. What does your selfie reveal about your personality?

According to research by Lin Qiu and colleagues published in “Computers in Human Behaviour” “[P]eople who scored higher in agreeableness (similar to friendliness) were more likely to show positive emotion in their selfies and to hold the camera in a lower position; high-scorers on conscientiousness were less likely to reveal a private location in the background (presumably because of concerns about privacy); people who scored higher in neuroticism (suggestive of emotional instability) were more likely to pull a duck face; and finally, higher scores in openness-to-experience correlated with showing more positive emotion. Levels of extraversion were not correlated with any of the cues, perhaps because so many people attempt to appear outgoing in their selfies.” From “BPS Research Digest”, August 11, 2015.

7. This personality test can signal if you have selfish or manipulative tendencies

“Do you deceive other people for your own benefit, see others as weak and untrustworthy, and ignore moral codes? If so, you may be” a high Mach according to this summary presented in “Business Insider”, August 27, 2015.

8. Machiavellianism Scale

This is an interactive version of the MACH-IV test of Machiavellianism.

9. The Narcissist in Chief

Writing for the “New York Times”, Gerard DuBois summarizes research on the kind of leaders narcissists make with an eye toward evaluating presidential candidates.

10. Research Tool Demonstrates How Your Facebook Likes Reveal Your Personality

Eric Ravenscraft, writing for “LifeHacker”, discusses a tool developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge to analyze your Facebook like to reveal what people can learn about you. This link takes you directly to the tool should you wish to try it out for yourself.

11. How Changeable Is Gender?

Richard A. Friendman, professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College writes about how research in neuroscience suggests that gender identity and how it exists on a continuum in this thought-provoking essay. From “The New York Times”, August 22, 2015.

12. Here’s a Quick Way to Figure Out What You Should Do With Your Life, Based on Your Personality

Check out this colorful flow chart, based on the work of John Holland, which asks a series of questions to help you find your ideal career. From “The Muse”, July 13, 2015.

13. 6 Sample Questions Employers Ask to Assess your Personality

These 6 questions may be questions you are likely to see the next time you apply for a job. From “Business Insider”, July 16, 2015.

14. The Good Habit Which Boosts Self-Control

Research by Pilcher et al. (2015) and published in “Frontiers in Human Neuroscience” finds that good sleep habits like going to bed at the same time every night, can boost attention, improve decision-making, and strengthen the ability to resist impulses. From PsyBlog, July 10, 2015.

15. This Obvious Happiness Strategy Really Does Work, Study Finds

According to research by Catalino et al. from the journal “Emotion”, explicitly trying to feel happier as well as paying too much attention to how happy you feel have both been linked to feeling worse. The secret to happiness appears to be “prioritizing positivity”. From PsyBlog, July 3, 2015.

16. The Personality Trait Linked To The Strongest Immune System

Outgoing, sociable people also have the strongest immune systems according to a study by Vedhara et al. (2014) published in the journal “Psychoneuroendochrinology” and summarized here in PsyBlog, December 14, 2014.

17. The Psychological Secret to Great Exercise Habits

Here’s the secret: “It’s all about making sure there are regular cues which prompt you to automatically exercise”. The catch? These cues are likely to be different for different people. From PsyBlog, July 15, 2015.

18. Take the Narcissism Test and Find Out If You’re ’Normal’

Ames et al. (2006) created a short 16-item test for narcissism which was published in the “Journal of Research in Personality”. You can take an online version of their test here.

19. Is Life’s Happiness Curve Really U-Shaped

Evidence suggests that happiness is likely to increase as we age according to research summarized here in “The Guardian”, June 24, 2015.

20. Why CBT is Falling Out of Favour

What’s going on? “After analysing 70 studies conducted between 1977 and 2014, researchers Tom Johnsen and Oddgeir Friborg concluded that CBT is roughly half as effective in treating depression as it used to be.” Read about their results and possible explanations for this trend in this summary for “The Guardian”, July 3, 2015.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: Teach Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website as a companion to their Learn.Genetics website. Here you will find classroom activities to teach the basics of heritable traits and take-home activities to help students share what they’ve learned with their families. PDFs are available for download including instructions, student worksheets, overhead masters, and answer keys. Some of the material may be too basic for a college class (although the graphics which review the basics of inheritance would make an excellent review), the topics do include Epigenetics, gene therapy, personalized medicine, cloning, and other fairly sophisticated topics. Most of the activities can be modified to fit the needs of your students and the topic of personality.

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 9, May 2014

May 31, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,996 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are mourning the loss of Sandra Bem, feminist scholar and psychologist who died on May 20 just short of her 70th birthday. She will be remembered for her theoretical work and research on gender schema theory, the social construction of gender and sexuality, and her unconventional views on gender and child rearing.

Like many of our readers this month, we welcome the unofficial start of summer and the end of a semester (and school year!). We hope the summer is a time of rest and rejuvenation and we’ll be doing our best to keep the inspiration coming as you look ahead to teaching personality in a future semester.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Love Makes You Strong: Romantic Relationships Help Neurotic People Stabilize Their Personality

Romantic relationships can help young adults who are high in Neuroticism to become less anxious, insecure, and easily annoyed according to research by Christine Finn and colleagues in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for “Science Daily” May 9, 2014.

3. Rice Theory Explains North-South China Cultural Differences

From the page: “A new cultural psychology study has found that psychological differences between the people of northern and southern China mirror the differences between community-oriented East Asia and the more individualistic Western world — and the differences seem to have come about because southern China has grown rice for thousands of years, whereas the north has grown wheat.” From “Science Daily”, May 8, 2014.

4. Does Facebook Affect Our Self-Esteem, Sense of Belonging?

From the page: “With 1.11 billion users per month on average, Facebook has become a global phenomenon offering continual and direct communication with friends and family. Research into how social media websites define us socially, and the influence that social media has on our personal welfare, suggests that a lack of social participation on Facebook leads to people feeling less meaningful.” From “Science Daily”, May 8, 2014.

5. Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient

Sam Kean for “Slate” magazine provides this retelling of the Gage tale, this time with the debunking of some myths and with additional information demonstrating that “The true story of Phineas Gage is much more fascinating that the mythical textbook accounts”. Includes new computer models of Gage’s injury and how it may have affected his brain functioning.

6. I Want You To Know That I’m Tyrion Lannister

The Forer (Barnum) Effect has found a new home: The Internet Quiz. Writer Maria Konnikova suggests that the reason why we are so drawn to these obviously false personality quizzes may have to do with our fascination with the self and our fundamental need to belong. From “The New Yorker”, May 1, 2014.

7. This is the Personality Trait That Most Often Predicts Success

Writing for “Inc.” magazine, Drake Baer describes the research which demonstrates that being high in Conscientiousness will help you succeed in many domains of life across the life span. From May, 2014.

8. Teaching Sexual Orientation

Psychologist David G. Myers suggests ways of teaching controversial topics like sexual orientation by focusing on evidence-based conclusions and how psychologists might test whether social policies affect the health and well-being of gay people. From the APS “Observer”, 27(5), May/June, 2014.

9. Epigenetics 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Explaining Everything

Genetics researcher Cath Ennis wrote this primer for The Guardian newspaper explaining what epigenetics is and how it can help us understand human health and disease. Posted April 25, 2014.

10. Do we Get Nicer With Age?

Amy Kluber, for Newsy, reports on a study by Christopher Soto and colleagues which found that people who were happier at the start of the study become more emotionally stable, conscientious, agreeable and introverted as they matured over the course of the study demonstrating that personality changes with life events. Posted April 22, 2014. Runs 1 minute 34 seconds.

11. Cultivating Happiness Often Misunderstood

From the page: “The concept of maximizing happiness has been explored by researchers, who have found that pursuing concrete ‘giving’ goals rather than abstract ones leads to greater satisfaction. One path to happiness is through concrete, specific goals of benevolence — like making someone smile or increasing recycling — instead of following similar but more abstract goals — like making someone happy or saving the environment.” From “Science Daily”, April 15, 2014.

12. Outgoing Behavior Makes for Happier Humans: Across Cultures, Extroverts Have More Fun

From the page: “Happy is as happy does, apparently — for human beings all over the world. Not only does acting extroverted lead to more positive feelings across several cultures, but people also report more upbeat behavior when they feel free to be themselves.” From “Science Daily”, April 15, 2014.

13. Biological Evidence of Positive and Negative People in the World

From the page: “The ability to stay positive when times get tough — and, conversely, of being negative — may be hardwired in the brain, finds new research.” From “Science Daily”, April 2, 2014.

14. Computer Maps 21 Distinct Emotional Expressions — Even “Happily Disgusted”

From the page: “Researchers have found a way for computers to recognize 21 distinct facial expressions — even expressions for complex or seemingly contradictory emotions such as “happily disgusted” or “sadly angry.” The study more than triples the number of documented facial expressions that researchers can now use for cognitive analysis.” From “Science Daily”, March 31, 2014.

15. Favorite Link Revisited: The Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI)

According to the site: “The Bem Sex Role Inventory was developed in 1971 by Dr. Sandra Lipsitz Bem. It characterizes your personality as masculine, feminine, androgynous, or undifferentiated. The BSRI is based on gender stereotypes, so what it’s actually measuring is how well you fit into your traditional sex role. Thus, your score may say as much about how our cultural expectations have changed over the last 35 years as it does about your personality.” You can take the original 60-item scale and receive your scores automatically online here.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 6, February 2014

February 27, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,948 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, the genes have it! Read below to hear about some interesting cross-cultural work about a genotype-environment correlation that leads to greater cultural value-learning among both European-Americans and Asians, social experience affecting our genetic functioning, and the genetic predisposition to focus on the negative. Don’t fret, in our “Favorite Link Revisited” feature, we provide you with background information to help your students understand the latest research findings in this fascinating area.

Also, we’ve done some housekeeping this month and have caught up on our backlog of older links we are only just getting around to updating. Please excuse the “mess” of slightly older links below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. The Remarkable Human Self

According to Roy Baumeister in his Award Address delivered at the 25th APS Annual Convention in Washington, DC, “the self is not part of the human anatomy, but rather a powerful interface between our animal bodies and the complex cultural systems in which we live. Without the concept of self … scientific analysis of social and economic processes would be all but impossible.” You can read a summary of his talk or watch a video of the entire talk (48 minutes and 24 seconds) here. Posted January 2014.

3. Young And In Love? Thank Mom and Dad, At Least A Little

“Teenagers’ relationships with their parents have a small but measurable impact on their romantic relationships up to 15 years later, according to researchers at the University of Alberta” according to research published in the “Journal of Marriage and Family” and summarized here for NPR, February 2014.

4. Facebook Now Offers Over 50 Genders to Choose From in Your Profile

Facebook now lets users self-identity using a multitude of terms to customize their gender beyond “male” and “female”.

5. The Powerlessness of Positive Thinking

Writer Adam Alter describes the paradoxical finding that positive fantasies may actually lessen our chance of succeeding — if they prevent us from taking concrete steps to realize our goals. From “The New Yorker”, February 19, 2014.

6. Mapping Mindsets: The World of Cultural Neuroscience

Summarizes research suggesting that cultural differences in emotional expression may be linked to neuroplasticity, genetics, and a genotype-environment interaction. From the “APS Observer”, December 2013.

7. Social Experiences Affect Our Genes and Health

“Scientists are uncovering increasing evidence that changes in the expression of hundreds of genes can occur as a result of the social environments we inhabit. As a result of these dynamics, experiences we have today can affect our health for days and even months into the future” according to research by George Slavich and Steven Cole at the University of California, Los Angeles, and summarized here in the “APS Observer”, May/June 2013.

8. Psychology 411

“Psychology Degree 411 is a comprehensive resource for prospective students interested in pursuing a degree in psychology or becoming a psychologist. Explore popular psychology degree options, find schools with psychology programs, and learn about some of the top careers in psychology.”  Includes information on degrees in psychology, schools, licensure to become a psychologist, scholarships, careers, interviews with professionals, jobs and more.

9. The Grad Cafe Forum

This website provides a platform for people who are applying to or in graduate programs — psychology included — to post questions, suggest strategy, and share information about specific graduate programs.

10. The Genetic Predisposition to Focus on the Negative

Research by Rebecca Todd and colleagues suggests that people with the ADRA2b gene are more likely to take not of negative emotional events than people without the gene. The was no difference in the processing of positive emotion words by people with and without the gene. From “PsyBlog”, October 2013.

11. 19 Reasons Why Willpower Fails You, And What To Do About It

David DiSalvo, writing for “Psychology Today”, describe 19 science-based reason “why will and will alone isn’t enough” and what we can do about it.

12. What Every Parent Needs to Know About Praise

How to shift your dialogue from judging to loving by Laura Markham for “Psychology Today”, July 31, 2013.

13. Criticizing (Common Criticisms of) Praise

Psychology Alfie Kohn weighs in on the issue in this blog from “Psychology Today”, February 2012.

14. Why It’s a Bad Idea to Praise Children

Raul Raeburn weighs in a response to the Kohn article (above).

15. 6 Secrets You Can Learn From The Happiest People On Earth

Eric Barker takes a look back at what we can learn from the happiest people to make our own lives better in this post from his “Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog, December 2013.

16. Are Extroverts Really Happier?

Arnie Kozak redefines what happiness is for extroverts and introverts for “Psychology Today”, November 2013.

17. Are Extroverts Happier Than Introverts? Yes, But . . .

Susan Cain reflects on different meanings of happiness. While extroverts may define happiness as something more like exuberance, introverts may define happiness on other ways including flow, gratitude, solitude, melancholy, and meaning. From “Psychology Today”, December 2011.

18. Favorite Link Revisited: Learn Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website to disseminate educational materials on genetics, bioscience, and health. Includes animations to teach the basics of DNA, genes, heredity and traits, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 2, October, 2013

October 30, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,887 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Just in time for Halloween, we present a newsletter full of tricks and treats. First, the trick: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Monster Needs (see link below). You may be as amazed as we were to discover that zombies, vampires, ghosts, and werewolves can all achieve self-actualization. Of course, like most jokes of this type, the more you know about the actual theory, the funnier the jokes seem. Brought to you by the Canadian English language TV comedy channel BiteTV. Also in keeping with the season, see our special ‘’Favorite Link Revisited’’ for how to incorporate the characters of ‘’Twilight’’ as case studies for various theorists including Maslow, Horney, Erikson and others.

For more tricks, Lego this month released new play figures, one of which is a woman scientist. But we couldn’t get all that excited about the stereotype-busting brainiac, because they also released ‘’Diner Waitress’’, ‘’Dirndl Girl’’, ‘’Grandma’’, and ‘’Lady Robot’’. Decked out in pink accessories and rosy cheeks, the Lady Robot claims to ‘’party like nobody else’’ according to the press release issued by Lego. You win some and you lose some we guess!

Finally, the treat. If you’ve ever wondered if you are living in the right place, check out the latest research by Peter Rentfrow and colleagues and the geographical ‘’Mood Map’’ created from their work below. According to the quiz (with dubious validity) it says that I should be in South Carolina or Georgia. Hmm, with the temperatures we’ve been having in Philly this week, that doesn’t sound like a bad idea.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Monster Needs

According to the Canadian English language TV comedy channel BiteTV, zombies, vampires, ghosts, and werewolves all have their belongingness and self-esteem needs and can achieve self-actualization.

3. Video Clips of Elements of Master Teaching

(2013) by Jeffrey R. Stowell (Eastern Illinois University) and R. Eric Landrum (Boise State University) is ”composed of 73 short YouTube videos of college teachers displaying qualities associated with elements of master teaching. Information about each clip is contained in a table that lists the clip length, course discipline, course level, and specific teacher behaviors demonstrated. Viewers can use YouTube’s built-in functions to submit comments and provide like/dislike ratings. The videos could be incorporated into teaching seminars, graduate student training, faculty development efforts, and research studies on the impact of viewing elements of master teaching behaviors. It is accessible from the general page (here) under the category title ”Faculty Development” or directly at link above.

4. Two Guys On Your Head: Locus of Control

”Two Guys on Your Head” is a short feature, produced at KUT Radio, that explores topics associated with the brain. In this episode, University of Texas Professors Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke explain what locus of control is and review the evidence which suggests that though people differ in their view of reality believing that they have control over their outcomes or not, we can change our perceptions to cope better — even giving up control as circumstances warrant. (Audio; runs 8 minutes).

5. How Dare You Say Narcissism Is Increasing?

To satisfy the critics — and the curious — Jean Twenge provides the psychological evidence behind her ”New York Times” article (available here) claiming that today’s young people are more narcissistic than previous generations. From ”Psychology Today”, August 12, 2013.

6. Self-Control and Stress

Art Markman explains the marshmallow test and research on delay of gratification and how it predicts positive outcomes and a better ability to deal with stress. From ”Psychology Today”, July 16, 2013.

7. Losing is Good for You

Ashley Marryman summarizes the research on praise and rewards and suggests that the best thing we can give kids is the opportunity to fail . . . and to learn from that failure. From ”The New York Times”, September 24, 2013.

8. 23andMe’s Designer Baby Patent

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office award a patent on ”gamete donor selection” to the company ”23andMe” that sells at-home DNA testing kits. This technology would ”enable prospective parents to handpick a sperm or egg donor with whom they would likely to produce a child born with certain traits that they desire”. Whether this information is empowering to potential parents or a modern twist on eugenics is something you and your students can debate. From ”The Huffington Post”, October 4, 2013.

9. Lego Unveils First Female Lego Scientist

The toy company Lego just announced a new line of miniature figures including, for the first time, a woman in a non-traditional career. The scientist Professor C. Bodin comes complete with two Erlenmeyer flasks. The hope is that by providing a character girls can relate to, young girls can more easily imagine themselves as succeeding in the sciences. From ”ABC News”, September 4, 2013.

10. Scientists Discover One of the Greatest Contributing Factors to Happiness — You’ll Thank Me Later

What happens when people write a gratitude letter to a special person in their lives and then call that person and read their letter out lout to them? The result is happiness, according to psychological research demonstrated by this feel-good video. Runs 7 minutes 14 seconds.

11. CBT Relapse Prevention

”In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes examples of the application of techniques such as mindfulness, acceptance, and validation. He also explains how these and other important techniques can be used to enhance relapse prevention.” Posted by the Beck Institute, October 9, 2013. Runs 4 minutes, 59 seconds

12. Proposed Treatment To Fix Genetic Diseases Raises Ethical Issues

NPR’s ”Morning Edition” reports that ”The federal government is considering whether to allow scientists to take a controversial step: make changes in some of the genetic material in a woman’s egg that would be passed down through generations.” From October 9, 2013. Listen to the full story and read the transcript here. Runs 5 minutes and 40 seconds.

13. Helen Neville on Experiential, Genetic and Epigenetic Effects on Human Neurocognitive Development

”Recent advances in neuroscience have effectively put an end to the “nature or nurture” debate. Instead, the focus of discussion has switched to mechanisms and brain-based interventions — in what ways are neural circuits changed by experience? When is the brain most receptive to education and learning? And what effects does high versus low socioeconomic status (SES) have on the development of neurocognition?” Helen Neville addresses these questions in her 2013 APS William James Fellow Award Address. Rums 50 minutes and 13 seconds.

14. Changing Brains

Helen Neville and her colleagues at the University of Oregon Brain Development Lab created this 12-part program to help parents, educators, policy-makers, and care-givers of young children understand how and when experience shapes the development of the human brain. Separate segments focus on vision, hearing, motor skills, attention, language, reading, math, music, and emotions and learning.

15. Can cognitive behavioural therapy really change our brains?

From the website: ”Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a type of talking therapy that’s used to treat a wide range of mental health problems, from depression and eating disorders to phobias and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It recommends looking at ourselves in a different way that might prove useful for all of us in everyday life. But what happens to our brains when we have CBT?” From BBC Science, August 6, 2013.

16. U.S. regions exhibit distinct personalities, research reveals

”Americans with similar temperaments are so likely to live in the same areas that a map of the country can be divided into regions with distinct personalities”, according to new research by Peter Rentfrow and colleagues summarized here in ”Science Daily”, October 17, 2013.

17. America’s Mood Map: An Interactive Guide to the United States of Attitude

”Using personality test data from over one million people, researchers have identified three distinct personality regions in the country. Here, each state is colored by the region it belongs to and shaded according to how strongly its personality matches that profile.” Features a map of the United States identifying which states are ”Friendly and Conventional”, ”Relaxed and Creative”, and ”Temperamental and Uninhibited” along with 10-item survey which lets visitors discover which state most closely matches their personality. From ”Time Magazine”, October 22, 2013.

18. How to Find the Best Workout for Your Personality

By taking account of a person’s BAS and BIS or traits like introversion, extroversion, and neuroticism, people can find a workout which best matches their personality leading to long term habits of exercise. Or, in the words of one of the researchers, ”Physical activity is just another expression of our personal preferences and style”.

19. Favorite Link Revisited: Twilight Deconstructed

Drawing on classic theorists including Carl Jung, Karen Horney, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers and others, Donna Ashcraft takes a psychological and feminist approach to understanding the ‘’Twilight’’ characters in her book ‘’Deconstructing Twilight: Psychological and Feminist Perspectives on the Series’’. Thanks to her publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., you can read and download a PDF of Chapter 7 in which she uses Karen Horney’s 10 neurotic needs to understand the dynamics between Bella and her parents, Bella and Edward and more. (opens in PDF format)


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 1, September, 2013

October 1, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,856 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we bring you an unprecedented number of links to invigorate your personality classes, including a 3-part battle between the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and critics who find it lacks validity. In addition, just in time for you to prepare for Halloween next month, we found one of the strangest links yet. Our friend Michael Britt, he of The Psych Files, presents this highly original and unforgettable way of helping students keep the Psychosexual Stages straight. Freud as a zombie! Yes, you heard it here first, folks. As if arm wrestling with Freud wasn’t scary enough… As a chaser, we let Freud speak for himself in his own voice in our Favorite Link Revisited.

This month we want to give a special shout-out to Personality Pedagogy friends Kelvin Seifert and Zsuszanna Szabo at the Teaching Ed Psych Wiki. Sponsored by the Teaching Educational Psychology special interest group of the American Educational Research Association, The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki tries to be especially thorough. They are open to submissions and suggestions so check them out at the link below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki

The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki is a “collection of materials helpful in teaching introductory educational psychology in teacher education programs” including class activities and demonstrations, course assignments, course syllabi, and materials on specific topics within educational psychology.

3. How to Memorize Freud’s Stages of Psychosexual Development

From the site: “Need to memorize Freud’s stages of psychosexual development for a test? Here’s a mnemonic that should do the trick. In this brief video, the founder of psychoanalysis gives you a mnemonic and explains the 5 stages for you. What do orangutans and ogres have to do with Freud’s stages? They’ll help you remember them, that’s what. Find out how in this video episode” of “The Psych Files” podcast, Episode 202, September 7, 2013. (runs 4 minutes, 43 seconds).

4. Say Goodbye to MBTI, The Fad That Won’t Die

Wharton professor and author Adam Grant explains how a good personality test ought to have reliability, validity, and be independent and comprehensive. He describes what these standards are and proceeds to weigh the evidence and concludes that the Myers-Briggs Personality Inventory is not a very good personality test. Posted September, 2013.

5. MBTI, If You Want Me Back, You Need to Change Too

A follow up to the previous article (Say Goodbye to the MBTI), Wharton professor and author Adam Grant explains what needs to happen in order for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to become a better personality test. He writes his critiques in the very entertaining form of a letter to a former love.

6. The Myers-Briggs Assessment is No Fad

In response to Wharton professor and author Adam Grant’s previous essays critiquing the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPP, the company which publishes the MBTI and trains test administrators, published this rejoinder defending their product.

7. Online Psychology Laboratory

According to the website, “OPL provides highly interactive resources for the teaching of psychological science. The peer-reviewed materials include online studies and correlational studies, large data sets, demonstrations, and teaching aids.”

8. The Link Between Personality and Immunity

Research suggests that “basic personality markers — extraversion, hostility, and optimism among them — do seem to play a role in how well someone wards off sickness.” Read about the latest findings here in the Association for Psychological Science “Observer”, September, 2013.

9. Abraham Maslow and the pyramid that beguiled business

The BBC News Magazine takes a look at the question “The psychologist Abraham Maslow’s theory of human motivation is 70 years old but continues to have a strong influence on the world of business. What is it, and is it right?” August 31, 2013.

10. How Evolution Works, Animated in Minimalist Motion Graphics

This simple and engaging cartoon explains the basics of evolution and “why DNA copying errors explain blue eyes”. Runs 11 minutes 48 seconds. Warning: contains a cartoon depiction of sex at 4:13.

11. 23 Signs You’re Secretly a Narcissist Masquerading as a Sensitive Introvert

Past research has suggested that there are two types of Narcissism: “Grandiosity-Exhibitionism” and “Vulnerability-Sensitivity”. While both types share a common core of traits including conceit, arrogance, and “the tendency to give in to one’s own needs and disregard others” they present differently according to research summarized in this article. Includes a 23-item scale measuring Hypersensitive Narcissism.

12. Hypersensitive Narcissism Scale

This 23-item scale was recently presented by Jonathan Cheek, Holly Hendin, and Paul Wink at the 2013 Association for Research in Personality conference.

13. 23 Signs You’re Secretly An Introvert

From the website: “Think you can spot an introvert in a crowd? Think again. Although the stereotypical introvert may be the one at the party who’s hanging out alone by the food table fiddling with an iPhone, the “social butterfly” can just as easily have an introverted personality” according to this illustrated article from “The Huffington Post”, August 29, 2013.

14. 31 Unmistakable Signs That You’re An Introvert

“BuzzFeed” put together this entertaining series of gifs illustrating what it’s like to be an introvert.

15. Psychology Teaching Ideas: A Blog for Teachers of AS and A2 Psychology

Experienced teacher of A Level Psychology in the UK, Caroline Rigby created this blog “for teachers of A Level Psychology. Posts on this blog include ideas to keep teaching topical by using Psychology related news and publications in the classroom and ways to ensure students experience Psychology at A Level in a way that equips them with the thinking and study skills for future study.”

16. Is Baby Male or Female? Germans Offer Third Gender

In Germany, newborn babies with ambiguous genitalia will no longer be rigidly labeled male or female on their birth certificates. Parents may indicate “undetermined” or “unspecified”, wait until later in the child’s life to declare a gender, or even never officially declare a gender. From “ABC News”, August 22, 2013.

17. Attachment Explained: Peppermint Patty, Lucy van Pelt, Schroeder, and Charlie Brown…

Bartholomew and Horowitz’ four categories of attachment are visualized using characters from the classic cartoon “Peanuts”.

18. 7 Persistent Myths about Introverts and Extroverts

PsychCentral presents this list of myths from the one that introverts are shy and don’t make good public speakers to the one that extroverts are shallow and don’t like quiet time.

19. The Dance Between Codependents & Narcissists

This article from “PsychCentral” describes the “codependency dance” between the narcissistic taker/controller and the codependent pleaser/fixer.

20. Why Parenting Can Never Have a Rule Book: Children’s Genetics Significantly Affect How They Are Parented

A meta-analysis published in the October 2013 “Personality and Social Psychology Review” by Reut Avinun and Ariel Knafo describes how individual parenting styles may be a reaction to the child’s genotype in this summary from “Science Daily”, September 3, 2013.

21. Men and Women Are the Same Species!

“Similarities between the sexes can be as important as differences” according to this summary of areas of differences and similarity between the sexes by Agustín Fuentes for “Psychology Today”, May 24, 2012.

22. So, What’s Your Story?

“What are some of the harmful stories you tell about yourself, and how could you rewrite those stories to be more supportive and nurturing of who you really are?” Read about how we can change the stories we tell about ourselves by Melissa Kirk for “Psychology Today”, April 27, 2012.

23. Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice

Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: “I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 1, September, 2013


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 9, May, 2011

May 30, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,235 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy unofficial start of summer!

Ah, is there anything as glorious as being curled up with a good book on a summer’s day? If you love summer reading (especially fiction) and already have a stack of titles awaiting your attention, you’ll be interested to know that what you always suspected is true: Reading fiction like ”Twilight” or ”Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” for just 30 minutes can make people feel like they are part of an entirely different world. Researchers found that not only does this feel good, as any young Harry Potter fan can attest to, but it also changes us. Read all about it in our second link below. And dust off your library card, Kindle, or beloved old favorites from your shelves and get busy exploring new worlds . . . and yourself! But don’t stay up too late, as sleep deprivation has its own problems as you can read below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. We Actually ‘Become’ Happy Vampires or Contented Wizards When Reading a Book
”[R]eading satisfies a deeply felt need for human connection because we not only feel like the characters we read about but, psychologically speaking, become part of their world and derive emotional benefits from the experience” according to research by Shira Gabriel and Ariana Young, published this month in ”Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, May 10, 2011.

3. Over 40 Playful Yet Practical Ways to Cultivate Creativity
Margarita Tartakovsky presents these ways to boost creativity to make you happier and more productive. From ”Psych Central”.

4. From the Beginning, the Brain Knows the Difference Between Night and Day
“The brain is apparently programmed from birth to develop the ability to determine sunrise and sunset, [according to] new research on circadian rhythms” by August Kampf-Lassin and Brian Prendergast and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, April 28, 2011.

5. Snooze Control: Fatigue, Air Traffic and Safety
Richard R. Bootzin presented his paper ”If Sleep is So Important, Why Do We Get So Little of It?” at the 23rd Annual APS Convention earlier this month. Read about his work inspired by some recent notable near-misses of aircraft due to fatigued air traffic controllers. The problem is not with individuals but with the recovery time between shifts for shift workers according to this summary from ”Science Daily”, April 25, 2011.

6. Peak Experiences: Big Moments
”Life can drone along at a hum for years—then break into a short but glorious chorus that changes us forever. It’s impossible to predict such peak experiences; in fact, that’s part of their charm. But it is possible to prepare for them” as Rebecca Webber explains in this article from ”Psychology Today,” September 01, 2010.

7. 10 Quick Stress Busters
Therese Borchard, editor at ”Psych Central”, has 10 tips for dealing with stress (e.g., simplify, prioritize, laugh, exercise, etc.). Borchard readily admits that she uses an average of 5 per day, and as much as all 10 on a truly bad day.

8. The Healing Power of Laughter
Theresa Borchard outlines the stress-busting and healing power of laughter in this essay from ”Psych Central”.

9. The Psychology of Cells
”New techniques are allowing researchers to measure how the environment affects gene expression, leading to some remarkable insights, including the finding that loneliness primes the immune system to turn on its inflammatory response — a risk factor for disease.” according to research summarized in this article by Beth Azar for the APA ”Monitor”, May 2011.

10. 7 Tips for Giving Effective Praise
Gretchen Rubin distills much of the research on praise to these 7 tips including be specific, be sincere, and more, in this article from ”Psych Central”.

11. Happiness Has A Dark Side
”It seems like everyone wants to be happier and the pursuit of happiness is one of the foundations of American life. But even happiness can have a dark side […] people who strive for happiness may end up worse off than when they started” according to research by June Gruber, Iris Mauss and Maya Tamir published this month in ”Perspectives on Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, May 17, 2011.

12. What Does Your Handshake Say About You?
While not exactly a window into the soul, handshakes do play an important part in generating a first impression. People can accurately judge a target’s extraversion and, for men only, conscientiousness, from a handshake. Given that consciousness is an effective predictor of success at work, both men and women may want to think about the impression their handshakes create, according to research by Frank Bernieri and Kristen Petty published this month in ”Social Influence” and summarized here in The British Psychological Society’s ”Research Digest”, May 13, 2011.

13. Why Extroverts are the Happiest People
”Extroverts are the cheeriest personality type, and a new study finds that the root of their happiness may be in their memories. People who are extroverted remember the past in a more positive light than other personality types” according to new research by Ryan Howell, as summarized in this article from ”Life Science”, May 3, 2011.

14. Psychologists Discover We’ve Been Underestimating the Unconscious Mind
Neurologists and cognitive psychologists once believed that we need awareness for integration of stimuli into a coherent whole. However, ”integration can happen even when we’re unaware of the stimulus […] Unconscious processes are much more sophisticated and deeper than was previously believed” according to research by Liad Mudrik, Dominique Lamy, Assaf Breska, and Leon Y. Deouell published in ”Psychological Science” and summarized here in ”Medical Xpress”, May 12, 2011.

15. I Control Therefore I am: Chimps Self-Aware
”Chimpanzees are self-aware and can anticipate the impact of their actions on the environment around them, an ability once thought to be uniquely human” according to research by Takaaki Kaneko and Masaki Tomonaga and summarized here in PhysOrg.Com, May 4, 2011.

16. Think It’s Easy to Be Macho? Psychologists Show How ‘Precarious’ Manhood Is
”Manhood is a “precarious” status — difficult to earn and easy to lose. And when it’s threatened, men see aggression as a good way to hold onto it” according to research by Jennifer K. Bosson and Joseph A. Vandello, published in ”Current Directions in Psychological Science”, and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, May 3, 2011.

17. When Self-Esteem Is Threatened, People Pay With Credit Cards
”People shop for high status items when they’re feeling low, and they’re more likely to make those expensive purchases on credit”, according to a study in ”Social Psychological and Personality Science” by Niro Sivanathan and Nathan Pettit and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, May 6, 2011.

18. Scientists Find Genetic Link to Depression
”Scientists say they have discovered the first solid evidence that variations in some peoples’ genes may cause depression […] And in a rare occurrence in genetic research, a British-led international team’s finding of a DNA region linked to depression has been replicated by another team from the United States who were studying an entirely separate group of people,” ”Reuters”, May 16, 2011.

19. Happiness Gene Located
”A gene which regulates the movement of serotonin in the brain has been labeled the “happiness gene” by researchers from the London School of Economics and reported in the ”Journal of Human Genetics”. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct link between an individual’s happiness and a specific genetic condition” according to research by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and summarized here in ”Medical News Today”, May 7, 2011.

20. Song Lyrics Suggest Narcissism Is On the Rise
Nathan DeWall and his colleagues ”analyzed the lyrics of songs on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart from 1980 to 2007. They found a statistically significant trend toward narcissism in the music, with the words “I” and “me” gradually replacing “we” and “us.”” Read about his work in this article from ”Life Science”, April 26, 2011.

21. Activity: The Soundtrack of Your Life
Describes an activity where students identify eight major events in their lives (e.g., deaths, first car, entering high school, etc.) and find songs (music and lyrics) to correspond to these events, designing an imaginary soundtrack of their lives. Students write about the experience, submit their compilations, and/or present a song to the class with an explanation of its import. Originally designed to be a writing assignment, with some additional guidance this activity can be used to illustrate narrative psychology, the self, Erikson’s stages, and other theories of personality psychology.

22. Favorite Link Revisited: Review Fun: Grab That Spoon!
Educator and simulation game guru Sivasailam (Thiagi) Thiagarajan maintains a web site with tons of ideas to get participants involved and playing with ideas. Grab That Spoon! is a quick, five-minute game with a dash of friendly competition. It’s a game in which everyone participates regardless of the size of the group (5 or 500, it still works!). It’s a game that allows the learners to generate the review information, to participate in it, and to discuss their own understanding of the material learned. In other words, it’s a game in which the participants learn a lot in a little time!


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 8, April, 2011

May 1, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,224 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you know that April is Stress Awareness Month? With the end of the semester upon many of us, is anyone NOT aware of stress these days? In this spirit, we offer you some links related to the topic of stress and resilience.

For example, the insurance company Blue Cross and Blue Shield, at least in Pennsylvania, has put together a campaign for employers to increase awareness of stress, the negative impact of stress, how to cope with stress, and resources employees can use to manage stress. Included in the kit is a 12-item Hardiness scale (see link below). While it may seem odd to include this non-academic test as part of our resources on Personality Pedagogy — after all, we pride ourselves on being the largest repository of legitimate personalty tests on the web — the actual Hardiness scale is not available for general use. This scale, however, was created by hardiness researcher Suzanne Kobasa. While not valid for research, it will illustrate for students what hardiness is and give them a sense of their own hardiness.

Ah, spring! The time to put away heavy clothing and brighten up with the world with light jackets, bright colors, and controversial toe nails. This month J. Crew sparked a debate on gender identity by featuring a sweet photo of president and creative director Jenna Lyon and her five-year-old sharing a playful moment. The controversy? She painted her son’s toenails neon pink. The question at issue is whether a child’s gender identity be affected by engaging in cross-gender behavior. People, including psychologists, are weighing in on all sides of the issue that pits innocent fun and natural curiosity against gender confusion and a societal abandonment of gender. No doubt you and students will have an opinion on this issue, and keeping it grounded in what we know about child development, gender identity, and sexual identity, could spark some interesting discussions in your personality classes this month (see link below).

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (”Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. J. Crew Ad Showing Boy With Pink Nail Polish Sparks Debate on Gender Identity

The article in Fox News summarizes a recent debate caused by a charming photo J. Crew ran in their spring catalog featuring a company executive and her five-year-old son sporting neon pink nail polish. Parents, doctors, and psychologists are weighing in. This summary written by Diane Macedo from April 11, 2011 summarizes the controversy and provides links to commentary from both sides of the issue.

3. Stress Awareness: Hardiness Quiz

The insurance company Blue Cross and Blue Shield designed a stress awareness kit based on the work of Suzanne Kobasa on Hardiness. Respondents answer a dozen questions and can score themselves on control, commitment, and challenge, the Three C’s of hardiness. Included in this kit are the quiz, scoring instructions, interpretation, a summary of how stress affects the body, stress reduction exercises, and strategies for handling stress.

4. Want to Live to 100? Try To Bounce Back From Stress

”Gerontologist and commentator Mark Lachs says one of the keys to a long, health old age is the ability to keep moving forward after life’s inevitable setbacks” in this piece from NPR’s ”Morning Edition”, April 11, 2011.

5. Stress and Aging

While stress is known to have a negative impact on the body (e.g., notably affecting chromosomal telomeres and leading to cancer), new evidence suggests that stress management (e.g., counseling, exercise) stops this damage and actually promotes their repair. The link is to a summary which ran in ”The Economist,” April 7, 2011. Also, see this summary from ”Science Daily”, April 2, 2011.

6. What is Psychological Resilience?

Provides an overview of what resilience is, the characteristics of resilient people, examples of resilient people, enhancing psychological resilience, measuring resilience, and more.

7. Resilience: Build Skills to Endure Hardship

The Mayo Clinic provides this guild to resilience and mental health including tips to build resilience and when to seek professional advice.

8. The Penn Resiliency Program

Based on Ellis’ Adversity-Consequences-Beliefs (ABC) model and the cognitive-behavioral theories of depression by Aaron Beck, Albert Ellis, and Martin Seligman, elementary and middle school children learn to detect automatic thoughts, evaluate the accuracy of these thoughts, and to consider alternatives to challenge negative beliefs. Includes an overview of the program, references, current projects, and a summary of research findings using the program.

9. Extreme Photo Retouching

Images in the media can have a powerful effect on the self-concept and self-esteem of young people. Many are unaware of just how doctored up media images ares. This movie shows the photo retouching process in detail reinforcing the idea that images we see are often idealized and unrealistic (runs 2 minutes, 29 seconds).

10. Learning Through Digital Media Experiments in Technology and Pedagogy

This combination printed book, free e-book, and web page is a collection of methodologies, social practices, and hands-on assignments by leading educators who are using digital media to enhance learning on and off college campuses. For example, recent essays included evaluation of new technologies, principles of fair use, networking in the classroom, and using technology to improve teaching and learning.

11. Self-promotion on Facebook Correlates With Narcissism

Students who use technology for self-promotion tend to be more narcissistic than those who simply use technology to connect to others” according to research by Meghan M. Saculla and W. Pitt Derryberry” and summarized in this article in ”The Chronicle of Higher Education”, April 4, 2011.

12. Gender: Color Survey

Randall Munroe, the creator of the xkcd comic put together an online survey of color names for a friend. With the help of over 222,000 users some five million colors were named. One of the most striking results is how men and women differ in their color naming, with women, for the most part, using more precise discriminations. Scroll down for a nice graphic illustrating this gender difference.

13. Favorite Link Revisited: Pink is For Boys and Blue is For Girls?

Pink is For Boys and Blue is For Girls? In response to an article published in Current Biology claiming that there is evolutionary support for why girls prefer pink (Hurlbert & Link, 2007), Writer Ben Goldacre wrote this column for The Guardian (August 25, 2007) to debunk both the myth that “blue is for boys and pink is for girls” and this piece of “bad science” in his words. He uses cross-cultural differences in color preference and cultural changes within the U.S. to question the “Biological components of sex differences in color preference” (the title of the original article). See the whole article by Goldacre including graphs and charts at his Bad Science website.