Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 12, August, 2011

August 31, 2011

Hello and welcome to the sixtieth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,282 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are pleased to bring you an eclectic collection of links from sexism and heterosexism to your brain and your awkward friends. Many of the links below are to summaries of the latest research in personality psychology, most of which has been published this month.

We’ve been doing some housecleaning of sorts this month, painstakingly reviewing every link on the entire site, removing broken links, and updating old links. This is a big job, as you might imagine, so if you find a broken link or have a new link to suggest please let us know.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Too Pretty to Do Homework?

This summer, JC Penny offered a t-shirt for sale for girls which read ”I’m too pretty to do homework so my brother has to do it for me”. Adding insult to injury was the caption next to the photo of the shirt: ”Who has time for homework when there’s a new Justin Bieber album out? She’ll love this tee that’s just as cute and sassy as she is.” Due to public outcry, sale of the shirt was discontinued as delivering an inappropriate and sexist message.

3. Your Most Awkward Friends May Save Your Life

Your insecure and anxious friends may be better that your secure friends at detecting impending danger and acting quickly according to research by Tsachi Ein-Dor and colleagues, and summarized here in ”LiveScience”, August 17, 2011.

4. Narcissism May Benefit the Young, Researchers Report; But Older Adults? Not So Much

A new study suggests that some forms of narcissism may be beneficial — at least in the short term — for making the transition into adulthood. This, according to research by Patrick Hill and Brent Roberts, published this month in ”Social Psychological and Personality Science” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, August 11, 2011.

5. Review Highlights Flawed Logic of Segregating Boys and Girls for Education Purposes, Based on Alleged Brain Differences

When it comes to learning and education, neuroscience has identified few reliable differences between boys’ and girls’ brains. There is no scientific basis for teaching boys and girls separately according to a review by Lise Eliot published this month in ”Sex Roles” and summarized here in ”Science Daily”, August 18, 2011.

6. Teaching Research Methods

Jeff Standen conducted a workshop in 2010 at the ATP Conference on Teaching Psychology. This page contains links to his PowerPoint slides with suggestions for teaching research methods, a research methods mindmap, a PowerPoint-based experiment you can do with your class, PowerPoint slides on correlation, an overview of psychological research methods, levels of measurement, and notes on reliability and validity and much more.

7. Resources for Teaching Neuroscience

Jeff Standen compiled these resources for teaching neuroscience including PowerPoint slides on neurons, the brain and brain research and much more.

8. Evolution and Genetics

Jeff Standen shares his PowerPoint slides on natural selection and genetics.

9. Psychlotron.org.uk

Psychlotron.org.uk is a website of teaching resources for teachers and lecturers. Though aimed at those teaching introductory psychology in the British system, there are many free resources here applicable to those teaching personality psychology including this unit on Freud and Personality.

10. Who Am I? Your Brain

The Science Museum of National Museum of Science and Industry (NMSI), London, UK sponsors an extensive website. Check out their interactive online exhibit on ”Who Am I?” featuring videos, pictures, handouts, and information on understanding your body, your brain, and your genes. This page on ”Your Brain” answers the questions how can illness affect the brain, what happens when you are asleep, how do drugs affect the brain, what are emotions, and others.

11. Who Am I? Your Genes

The Science Museum of National Museum of Science and Industry (NMSI), London, UK sponsors an extensive website. Check out their interactive online exhibit on ”Who Am I?” featuring videos, pictures, handouts, and information on understanding your body, your brain, and your genes. This page on ”Your Genes” answers the questions where did your genes come from, what was the Human Genome project, how do genes affect your health, and others.

12. Attributional Styles Test and Locus of Control

Discovery Health presents this online version of a 10-item locus of control scale with scoring and feedback. However, the real fun begins when you are asked to take the 47-item long version including scales measuring optimistic and pessimistic explanatory style, the three dimensions of internal-external, stable-unstable, global-specific, career and academic locus of control, belief in luck, health locus of control and more. All scales are scored automatically and feedback is provided.

13. Probe the Brain

PBS presents this site where you pretend you are a brain surgeon and get to virtually map out the brain’s motor cortex.

14. MRI — The Magnetic Miracle Game

NobelPrize.org, the official site of the Nobel prize, presents this interactive game which illustrates how an MRI works, why metal can not be near the apparatus, and how does MRI compare to x-ray and CAT images.

15. Brain Facts

The society for neuroscience provides this free 74-page primer on the brain and nervous system designed as an introduction to neuroscience for a lay audience.

16. Heal Thyself: Think Positive

Realism may be bad for your health: believing things will turn out fine or feeling safe and secure may help the body maintain and repair itself according to research by David Creswell and colleagues reviewed in this summary and video (3 minutes, 5 seconds) from ”New Scientist”, August 29, 2011.

17. Multicultural Teaching

The Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan sponsors this page of information and strategies for multicultural teaching. Everything from course planning, teaching social justice,  to responding to difficult decisions, and instructor identity.

18. Store Dresses Down Bride for Being a Lesbian

Yet another illustration of the ignorant and often negative attitudes that non-heterosexual people face. A bridal shop owner refuses to sell a woman a wedding dress because she didn’t want to be associated with an impending ”illegal action”, i.e., her marriage to another woman.

19. The Five Factors

Erica Melkonian put this montage together as an independent study project in her AP Psychology class in May of 2011. In it, she defines and illustrates people who are high and low on each of the five factors including the famous and infamous like Curious George and Adolph Hitler (3 minutes, 38 seconds).

20. Sam Gosling: Snoop: The Secret Language of Stuff

Gosling, author of Snoop, presents an overview of his research to the Commonwealth Club of California in this video. Topics include creativity and openness, Facebook profiles, faking a personal space, and much more. The site includes a biography of Gosling, highlights of the talk, transcript, and the entire talk (1 hour, 7 minutes).

21. Favorite Link Revisited: George Boeree of Shippensburg University

George Boeree should win some sort of award for the ”giving away” of psychology and resources for teaching psychology. He has written electronic textbooks in Personality Theories and General Psychology as well as for Social Psychology, History of Psychology, Qualitative Methods, and Buddhism, and has made them all freely available on the Internet. Thank you George, for all you do to help us teach and learn better!

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 5, Number 10, June, 2011

June 21, 2011

Hello and welcome to the fifty-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,256 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy Birthday to Personality Pedagogy! Five years ago this month we started a little wiki mostly to have a repository of all the cool and useful links we needed for our personalty class . . . and now we’ve become the top place on the web for resources for the teaching of personality psychology. We thank you, our loyal readers from all over the world, for your continued support and look forward to many more happy years.

This month, in the spirit of a good circus, we have ”a little something for everyone” as the great showman P. T. Barnum used to say. From evolution to the sensitivity, to longevity and brain myths, we have it all this month — including some videos illustrating the Barnum Effect.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the ”RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino ”at” arcadia ”dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than ”Personality Pedagogy”.

2. This is Psychology

The American Psychological Association presents this series of brief videos illustrating how psychological research can be applied to a broad range of issues and challenges such as bullying, children’s mental health, and other issues of concern to the general public.

3. The Secret to Longevity: It’s About Character, Not Just Calisthenics

Science writer Melanie A. Greenberg summarizes the results of Howard Friedman and Leslie Martin’s reanalysis of the Terman data identifying the psychosocial predictors of longevity, including strong social ties. From ”Psychology Today”, April 8, 2011.

4. Top Ten Myths About the Brain

Smithsonian.com asks ”When it comes to this complex, mysterious, fascinating organ, what do — and don’t — we know?” in this article by Laura Helmuth published May 20, 2011.

5. Women Warriors Show Resilience Similar to Men, Psychological Study Shows

”Women service members who experience combat are apparently as resilient as the men they serve alongside, according to a study” by Dawne Vogt and colleagues and summarized in ”Science Daily”, June 7, 2011.

6. When Did Girls Start Wearing Pink?

According to Smithsonian.com writer Jeanne Maglaty, ”every generation brings a new definition of masculinity and femininity that manifests itself in children’s dress”. Read about the vicissitudes of gender-appropriate clothing and color and check out the fascinating slide show of examples. Originally posted April 8, 2011.

7. Hi, My Name’s Sarah And I’m An ENTP

Sarah explains what it’s like to find out her Myers-Briggs Type Indicator scores and her interpretation of them in this blog entry from ”3 Daily Quarks”, June 6, 2011.

8. What is Evolutionary Psychology?

Daniel J. Kruger, makes his book Kruger, D.J. (2002). ”What is Evolutionary Psychology?” (Ann Arbor, MI: Altralogical Press) available online. Topics include adaptation, inclusive fitness, kin selection, altruism, sexual selection, parental investment, and more.

9. Viktor Frankl on Behaviorism

Frankl discusses his theory of logotherapy and Skinner’s theory of behaviorism and the impact of each on human behavior. Excerpted from a longer film (6 minutes, 46 seconds).

10. BIS, BAS and the Highly Sensitive Person

Summarizes theory and research on the BIS and the BAS and how these two systems may account for the experience of people who are particularly sensitive to sensory input.

11. The Highly Sensitive Person: A Self-test

Based on the work of Elaine Aron, this self-test helps people to see if they are one of the 15-20% of the population who are particularly sensitive to sensory input related to BAS and BIS functioning.

12. James Randi Explains the Art of Cold Reading

Alleged psychics use the cold reading to impress an audience and gain their trust. However, when put to the test, as skeptic, magician, and challenger of paranormal claims James Randi has done, their abilities are more art than science.

13. The Barnum Effect

John Stossel, co-anchor of the ABC news program 20/20, questions the accuracy of astrology, and amazes an audience with a demonstration of how false astrology readings are believable when they include general statements that could apply to anybody (2 minutes, 24 seconds).

14. Derren Brown on Astrology

The British illusionist, mentalist, and skeptic Derren Brown conducts a demonstration with audiences in the UK, US, and Spain, to illustrate how the Barnum Effect can lead people to believe psychic readings (8 minutes, 24 seconds).

15. The Cold Reading Technique

Denis Dutton explains the cold reading technique, the Barnum Effect, and analyzes a spirit medium’s performance, in this paper originally printed in (1988) ”Experientia”, Volume 44, 326-332.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: The Barnum Effect

An online personality test which gives false, but easily believable feedback, using the Barnum Effect. Take this test to remind yourself why good personality tests should provide specific feedback…and why horoscopes are so much fun!


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 8, April, 2010

April 20, 2010

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Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 8, April, 2010

Hello and welcome to the forty-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Have you done your spring cleaning yet? Here at Personality Pedagogy, we’ve been doing some cleaning up of our own. This month we have (finally!) posted some interesting links that we’ve been meaning to get to, on all sorts of topics from Narrative Psychology to Neuroscience to Viktor Frankl to Barbie (!). We even found some new links to personality tests to feed what may already be the largest collection of links to legitimate personality tests on the internet! All in all, this is our biggest issue this year.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our blog: https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ You can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (“Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. How to Interpret Brain Imaging Studies

The Neuroethics Learning Collaborative, of the Center for Neuroscience and Society at the University of Pennsylvania, created this video on Brain Imaging: Reality and Hype. Jeff Aguirre presents this talk on the basics of neuroimaging, focusing on how scientists go from tracking neural activity to making an inference about human behavior. Describes how PET scans and fMRIs work, and how to interpret results from fMRI studies. The talk was given on March 2, 2010 and runs 47 minutes and 10 seconds.

2. The Voodoo Debate

On the heels of the famous Ed Vul, Nancy Kanwisher and Hal Pashler paper ”Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience,” Matt Lieberman and Piotr Winkielman continued the debate at the annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Social Psychologists (SESP) in 2009. The first link is to the video of their debate; this link to background information about the original paper which started the controversy.

3. Viktor Frankl

Article from the ”MacMillan Encyclopedia of Death and Dying” by James W. Ellor (2003) on the life and work of Viktor Frankl.

4. Viktor Frankl ”Man Alive” (1977)

Frankl discusses his theories and his message of hope as an antidote to the problem of meaninglessness in this two-part interview from the 1977 TV program ”Man Alive” in Part 1 (4:28) and Part 2 (4:23).

5. Barbie says: ”Math class is tough”

This video presents the original 1992 Teen Talk Barbie saying the controversial phrase ”Math class is tough”. The company later dropped the phrase and apologized after criticism from the American Association of University Women in its report on how schools shortchange girls. This link is to the original story in The New York Times, October 21, 1992.

6. Gender and Race Equity in Math, Science, and Technology

Patricia B. Campbell, of Campbell-Kibler Associates, does research and evaluation to increase gender and race equity in math, science, and technology education. She has turned her findings into user-friendly reports, brochures, and pamphlets available on their site to view, download, print, and share with parents, educators, and children. Topics include Myths, Stereotypes, and Gender Differences; No Virginia, There is No Math Gene; Making It Happen: Pizza Parties, Chemistry Goddesses and Other Strategies that Work for Girls and Others; and much, much more.

7. The Snyder (1974) Self-Monitoring Scale

Mark A. Whatley, Valdosta State University, has posted selected personality tests for his Self and Identiy class. About the Self-Monitoring Scale he says: ”Developed by Mark Synder (1974), the Self-Monitoring (SM) Scale measures the extent to which you consciously employ impression management strategies in social interactions. Basically, the scale assesses the degree to which you manipulate the nonverbal signals that you send to others and the degree to which you adjust your behavior to situational demands. Some people work harder at managing their public images than do others. ” Scale and scoring instructions available here.

8. Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ; 1978)

Mark A. Whatley, Valdosta State University, has posted selected personality tests for his Self and Identiy class. About the Personal Attributes Questionnaire he says: ”Devised by Janet Spence and Robert Helmreich (1978), the PAQ assesses masculinity and femininity in terms of respondents’ self-perceived possession of various traits that are stereotypically believed to differentiate the sexes. The authors emphasize that the PAQ taps on limited aspects of sex roles: certain self-assertive or instrumental traits traditionally associated with masculinity and certain interpersonal or expressive traits traditionally associated with femininity. Although the PAQ should not be viewed as a global measure of masculinity and femininity, it has been widely used in research to provide a rough classification of participants in terms of their gender-role identity.” Scale and scoring instructions available here.

9. Self-Handicapping Scale

Mark A. Whatley, Valdosta State University, has posted selected personality tests for his Self and Identiy class. About the Self-Handicapping Scale he says: ”Self-handicapping refers to people’s engagement in behaviors that hinder performance in an effort to provide an excuse if they fail. Rhodewalt, Saltzman, & Wittmer (1984) have used this scale to effectively predict the performance of competitive athletes. You and others should find the responses to the items on this scale interesting. Question 4 on the scale must be reverse scored. Higher scores indicate greater self-handicapping. High self-handicappers compared to low self-handicappers are likely to engage in activities that protect themselves from an attribution that they are failures. If they do fail, then they can attribute their failure to the situation and not to their ability. ” Scale and scoring instructions available here.

10. Psychological Tests for Student Use

Ron Okada, York University, Toronto, maintains this handy page for his students conducting research. It contains scales and scoring instructions for many tests relevant for both social and personality psychology. The tests are available in PDF or Word 2002 formats for the downloading. Tests available include the Attitude Towards Women Scale, Authoritarianism-Rebellion Scale, Body Esteem, Loneliness Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Personal Attributes Questionnaire, Procrastination Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Aggression Questionnaire, Trust Scale and much more.

11. Evolution: What Does it Mean to Be Human?

This web page provides background information for the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History’s exhibit ”What Does it Mean to Be Human?” Describes ongoing research projects and evidence on the evolution of human behavior and physical characteristics. The site features a 3D interactive image library of fossils and artifacts, interactive walk-through of the exhibit, and resources for educators including lesson plans for 6-12 on human evolution, genetics, and more.

12. 10 Steps to Conquer Perfectionism

”Here are 10 techniques I use to break out of the prison of perfectionism in order to live and create as freely as I can in an imperfect world” according Therese Borchard, for PsychCentral.

13. Mating Strategies Not Universal

Summarizes the results of a cross-cultural study which found ”that men and women in monogamous societies, such as Pitcairn Islanders, and some polygynous societies, including the Aka in the Central African Republic, have overlapping ranges of number of offspring.” This finding suggests that there is greater variation in reproductive strategies than was once thought, so the tendency for men to be promiscuous and for females to be selective may not be universal. From Science News, May 23, 2009.

14. Genetic Risk for Anxiety Does Not Have to Be Destiny

Gene-by-environment interactions that place some people at risk for depression, anxiety disorders and alcohol abuse may not be the whole story. Monkeys with a gene which puts them at risk for aggression and anxiety were raised either in small or large group cages. While the monkeys raised in small groups were more likely to be aggressive and anxious, monkeys reared in large, social cages were protected from developing these problems. From ”Science Daily”, May 3, 2009.

15. Meditation May Increase Gray Matter

”Certain regions in the brains of long-term meditators were larger than in a similar control group. Specifically, meditators showed significantly larger volumes of the hippocampus and areas within the orbito-frontal cortex, the thalamus and the inferior temporal gyrus — all regions known for regulating emotions”. From ”Science Daily”, May 13, 2009

16. What’s Your Story? The Psychological Science of Life History Research

Jesse Bering describes life history research in which ”how we “spin” our self-narratives can reveal our hidden personalities” in this essay for ”Scientific American”, May 5, 2009.

17. Don’t!

Describes the classic work of Walter Mischel on delay of gratification research, including interviews with the now grown-up participants of the original marshmallow studies. ”Children who are able to pass the marshmallow test enjoy greater success as adults.” ”The New Yorker”, May 18, 2009, by Jonah Lehrer.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 4, December, 2009

December 28, 2009

Hello and welcome to the fortieth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new.

OK, I’ll admit it: I put baking Christmas cookies and visiting family ahead of sending out this newsletter! We’re hoping that you made similar choices, and are enjoying a restful holiday. But if you’re not enjoying the holidays, link #15 below is dedicated to you. When you’re ready to think about your classes in the new year, take a peek at some of the links below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or you can even re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our new blog: https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/  You can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (“Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted.

We wish a restful and renewing holiday season and all good things to you and yours in 2010!!

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. Psych Elves

Michael Britt, of the Psych Files Podcast, had the temerity to turn these three personality psychologists into Elves. Can you identify them?

2. Evolutionary Psychology: An Interview with David Buss (Part 1)

Psychology teacher Michael Britt created an episode for his podcast, The Psych Files, all about Evolutionary Psychology (Episode 111): Evolutionary Psychology – David Buss Responds to Critics. There has been a lot of criticism of evolutionary psychology lately. How do researchers respond? One of the leading researchers in this field – Dr. David Buss of the University of Texas – responds to these critics in part 1 of this 2-part episode. Find out how he responds to these questions: a) is evolutionary psychology sexist?, b) doesn’t evolutionary psychology just give people the ammunition they need to not take responsibility for themselves? c) theories from evolutionary psychology are not falsifiable, thus it’s not scientific and d) human society is always changing – it hasn’t been stable enough long enough for any human behavior to have evolved. (Originally released December 6, 2009).

3. Evolutionary Psychology: An Interview with David Buss (Part 2)

Psychology teacher Michael Britt created an episode for his podcast, The Psych Files, all about Evolutionary Psychology (Episode 112): David Buss Responds to Critics – Part 2. ”In part 2 of my interview with David Buss, he responds to more criticisms of evolutionary psychology. Here’s what we cover: a) does evolutionary psychology just give criminals another reason not to take responsibility for themselves?, b) is all the research in evolutionary psychology done on American college students?, c) are evolutionary psychology theories falsifiable? We cover such topics as whether women’s mating strategies change depending on where they are in their menstrual cycle? and How does evolutionary psychology might explain homosexuality? and what does evolutionary psychology say about cultural differences in the desire for women with a low waist-hip ratio?” (Originally released December 16, 2009).

4. Correlation and Causation

From the website: ”Looking for examples of correlation and causation? You’ve heard it a million times: correlation doesn’t mean causation. Still need help? Well, here’s a humorous look at this topic that I think drives home the point. The Psych Files “Breaking News” explores whether satisfied workers are more productive and whether living together causes divorce. I hope you enjoy this unique video episode of The Psych Files”. (Originally released November 16, 2009).

5. Narcissism Among Celebrities, on Facebook and in Shakespeare

From the website: ”Are celebrities really more narcissistic than you are? Is your Facebook page telling the world that you are a narcissist? And finally: who is Shakespeare’s most narcissistic character? I’ll give you a hint: the character can be found in Twelfth Night. So if you’re looking for more information about the Narcissistic Personality Disorder, or just everyday narcissism, as well as examples of famous narcissists, you’ll find it in this in this episode of The Psych Files”. (Originally released November 22, 2009).

6. Love and Envy Linked by the Same Hormone: Oxytocin

The hormone oxytocin, the “love hormone,” which affects behaviors such as trust, empathy and generosity, also affects opposite behaviors, such as jealousy and gloating. “Subsequent to these findings, we assume that the hormone is an overall trigger for social sentiments: when the person’s association is positive, oxytocin bolsters pro-social behaviors; when the association is negative, the hormone increases negative sentiments,” explains Simone Shamay-Tsoory at the University of Haifa. This summary, from ScienceDaily, November 13, 2009.

7. Males Have More Personality?

”Males have more pronounced personalities than females across a range of species — from humans to house sparrows — according to new research. [I]n most species males show more consistent, predictable behaviours, particularly in relation to parental care, aggression and risk-taking. Females, on the other hand, are more likely to vary their behaviour”, according to this summary from ScienceDaily, November 19, 2009.

8. The Introvert’s Corner: How to live a quiet life in a noisy world

Writer Sophia Dembling writes this blog filled with personal experiences, interviews with experts, and helpful suggestions about living as an introvert. Recent entries include: standing up for rights, surviving parties, friendships and more. Excellent way for extroverts to understand how the other half lives; good advice and insights for introverts.

9. Antidepressants Can Change Personalities

”Taking an antidepressant can lead to significant personality changes, likely for the better, a new study finds. The study looked at the effects of taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which are widely used to treat depression today, and found that those who took these antidepressants experienced more positive emotions, were more outgoing and more emotionally stable in the long-term. “Our findings lead us to propose a new model of antidepressant mechanism,” said Tony Z. Tang of Northwestern University in Chicago. “Our data suggests that modern antidepressants work partly by correcting key personality risk factors of depression”” according to this summary in Live Science, December 7, 2009.

10. 7 Thoughts That Are Bad For You

These 7 thoughts, or ways of thinking such as cynicism, lack of meaning, anxiety, lack of self-control, etc., reflect our personalities, affect how we cope with everyday life, and may be bad for our health and well-being in the long run.

11. fMRI techniques: Validity and Reliability Questioned

New findings raise questions about reliability of fMRI as gauge of neural activity in this article by Laura Sanders from Science News, December 19th, 2009; Vol.176 #13 (p. 16).

12. Bowing to Body Clocks, N.B.A. Teams Sleep In

Three basketball teams, the Boston Celtics, the San Antonio Spurs and the Portland Trail Blazers have dropped the traditional early morning shoot-around in favor of research on body clocks which suggests that a better night’s sleep will help players more than an additional practice the morning after a big game. By Howard Beck, New York Times, December 19, 2009. (Remember that access to articles in the New York Times is free but you need to register first by setting up an account).

13. Hourly Employees Happier Than Salaried

”People paid by the hour exhibit a stronger relationship between income and happiness”, according to a study published in the current issue of Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (PSPB), summarized in this article from Medical News Today, December 14, 2009.

14. Physical Activity Reduces Disease-Related Fatigue And Depression By Increasing Self-Efficacy

”Researchers in the US studying people with chronic diseases found that physical activity may reduce depression and fatigue by increasing self-efficacy, or the belief that one can master physical goals and attain a sense of accomplishment from applying oneself” according to this summary in Medical News Today, December 16, 2009.

15. 9 Holiday Depression Busters

Time-tested ways to cope with the flurry of the holiday season. Brought to you by BeliefNet writer Therese J. Borchard.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 3, November, 2009

November 25, 2009

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 4, Number 3, November, 2009

Hello and welcome to the thirty-ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

What’s new this month? Lots!!

Did you know that elders who go online show increased brain function and less depression than elders who do not use the internet to learn about new things, reminisce, play games, and connect with family and friends? You can read the whole article here: http://tinyurl.com/yh7pgo2

Are your students looking for a study abroad internship experience in psychology? AIDE, a not-for-profit organization which provides international internships and volunteer experiences, is offering a special 2-for-1 discount on deposits until November 30. Check it out: http://www.aideabroad.org/index.asp

Do you teach other classes in psychology? The Society for the Teaching of Psychology, Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, just debuted a wiki for the Teaching of Psychology (http://teachpsych.pbworks.com/). Here’s your chance to jump in to the wonderful world of wikis!

Are you familiar with Discovery Education? A division of Discovery Communications, i.e., they of the TV and magazine, designed a series of lesson plans for the k-12 classroom (but which can be easily beefed up for an intro-level college course). Though they seem to have many topics except for psychology (language arts, history, astronomy, ecology, economics, fine arts, biology, literature, mathematics and more) we found some gems for genetics, evolution and even Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams hidden in these pages. Check them out via the links below.

Do you own the ill-fated 6th edition of the APA manual? We have word from Ted Bosack (via the PsychTeacher listserv) about the APA Manual exchange program:

”The leadership of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (APA, Division 2) wants to be sure that as many of its members as possible are aware of APA’s decision to replace copies of the recently published Publication Manual revision that contained a number of errors and inconsistencies. APA will replace these purchased manuals with corrected copies. However, there are a number of requirements that must be met prior to a December 15, 2009, deadline if purchasers are to receive a replacement copy. These requirements are as follows:

APA has agreed to replace copies of the Publication Manual (1st printing). If
you wish to take advantage of this opportunity, you must follow these steps:
* Call 1-800-374-2721, ext. 5510 between 9:00 and 6:00 EST.
* State your desire to exchange your manual for a new printing and be
prepared to answer some questions.
* You will get an e-mail with an instruction sheet and pre-paid mailing label to
send your old manual back.
* REMEMBER, THE DEADLINE IS DECEMBER 15!!

These requirements are also detailed on the STP Web site at
http://teachpsych.org/news/news.php

Of course, if you’re fed up with the manual and the entire brouhaha, then check out the first link to a free, online, APA style sheet for the current (2009) style guidelines.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Remember, you can read old newsletters, comment on newsletters, view the current newsletter or you can even re-read what you missed in last month’s newsletter by checking out our new blog: https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com/ You can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via an RSS (“Really Simple Syndication”) feed as soon as they are posted.

I, personally, am very thankful for the community of teachers which have helped me with my teaching throughout the years and especially to the readers and subscribers who support Personality Pedagogy. We wish a bountiful and restful Thanksgiving holiday to you all!!

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. Free APA Style Sheet

From the website: ”APA Lite for College Papers” is a concise guide to crafting research papers in the style of the American Psychological Association (APA). It is based on the current edition of the APA Publication Manual (2009) while incorporating guidelines for ”Material Other Than Journal Articles” found in the last edition. Specifically covers writing scientific papers at the undergraduate level.

2. OTRP Teaching of Psychology Wiki

The Society for the Teaching of Psychology, Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, just debuted this wiki. Wiki-Master Sue Frantz, Highline Community College, Des Moines, WA, explains: ”This brand new resource is completely dependent on you to build it. In the spirit of reciprocity, we ask that if you take something, you leave something. To be able to write to this wiki, you will need to request access from the Wiki-Master.”

3. Statistics Glossary

The STEPS (STatistical Education through Problem Solving) consortium has developed problem-based modules to support the teaching of Statistics in various fields including Psychology. As part of their online support, Valerie J. Easton and John H. McColl maintain this statistics glossary for all of the terms covered in a basic course. The glossary is arranged alphabetically or organized around key topics including presenting data, sampling, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, categorical data, nonparametric methods, time series data, design of experiments, ANOVA, paired data, correlation, regression, and random variables and probability distributions

4. Psychobiography

This website, maintained by William Todd Schultz, Pacific University Oregon, describes psychobiography (the application of psychological theory and research to individual lives of historical importance), the influential people in the field, an annotated bibliography and lots more.

5. Nova: Stem Cell Breakthrough

Three separate teams overcome a biomedical hurdle—creating stem cells without the use of human embryos. Learn about their research here and much more about stem cells including related science news, links and books, transcript, and a teacher’s guide The program, 13 minutes and 39 seconds long, originally aired on PBS July 23, 2008 and is available in closed captioning. Click through to the teacher’s guide for a shortened version 5 minutes and 16 seconds long.

6. A Dream Interpretation: Tuneups for the Brain

A new theory suggests that dreams are a warm-up for the day ahead. In a paper published last month in the journal ”Nature Reviews Neuroscience”, Dr. J. Allan Hobson, a psychiatrist and longtime sleep researcher at Harvard, argues that the main function of rapid-eye-movement sleep, or REM, when most dreaming occurs, is physiological. Read all about his research in this ”New York Times” article by Benedict Carey, from November 10, 2009. (Remember that access to the New York Times is free, but you may need to sign up for a free account).

7. Henry Murray: 20 Needs

Summarizes Henry Murray’s theory of needs and describes the original 20 needs he wrote about including nAchievement, nPower, and nAffiliation.

8. Otto Rank (1914). The Myth of the Birth of the Hero. New York: Vintage.
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/mbh/index.htm

The full-text version of his book is available from this website: ”In this study Rank looks at a a wide variety of Eurasian hero birth narratives, including Greek, Roman, Judeo-Christian, Indian, and Germanic legendary figures. He uses the methodology and vocabulary of classic Freudian psychoanalysis to do so. The middle part of this book, where Rank enumerates some of these tales, will be the most useful for modern readers, as he draws on a wide range of sources, some of them fairly obscure. In the last part he puts these myths ‘on the couch’ as it were, and ties up his thesis very coherently.”

9. Dr. Matthew Fox: The Stanford Lectures: An Immersion in Creation Spirituality
What is the Creation Spirituality lineage and Why does it strike fear in the hearts of Inquisitors and Fundamentalists? What does it mean to be Spiritual and adult in the 21st century? What is the future of spirituality, religion and interfaith in our time? Fox answers these questions is a series of videos, using the theories of Otto Rank, ”the youngest and the most brilliant” of Freud’s students:

a) Otto Rank Overview of his theory (9 minutes, 57 seconds)

b) Otto Rank on Art (6 minutes, 50 seconds)

10. Genetic Screening: Ethical issues

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics, London, prepared this report to encourage debate about the ethical issues raised by research on genes associated with psychological and behavioral traits. Read their report, reviews of the evidence, and other materials here.

11. An interview with Dr. Klaus-Peter Lesch

From the website: ”In-cites talks with Dr. Klaus-Peter Lesch about his paper, “Association of anxiety-related traits with a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene regulatory region,” (Science 274[5292]: 1527-31, 29 November 1996), as well as his related research. This paper has been named a Highly Cited Paper in the field of Neuroscience & Behavior by  Essential Science Indicators, and currently has a total of 1,160 citations to its credit.” Includes a summary of the paper and a description of his current work.

12. Human Genome Project
http://genomics.energy.gov/
http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresources/Human_Genome/education/education.shtml

Find information about the Human Genome Project including project facts; educational materials; medicine and the new genetics; and ethical, legal and social issues. The second link brings you to resources for teachers.

13. Lesson Plan: Evolution

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on Evolution, students will: demonstrate an understanding of the theory of evolution, study how the theory of evolution has been received by society over time and consider why it has been so controversial and compare the theory of evolution to other ideas about how different life forms emerged and assess which ideas should be taught in science class.

14. Lesson Plan: The Interpretation of Dreams

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams, students will understand that Freud argued that our dreams contain clues to our hopes, fears, and fantasies and that Freud claimed that developments in our childhood affect the way we act and the kinds of dreams we have.

15. Lesson Plan: Genetics

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on Genetics, student will: Describe the technologies make that make genetic manipulation possible, identify situations in which genetic manipulation could solve a problem and debate the positive or negative arguments of the ethical issues surrounding the use of genetic manipulation.

16. Lesson Plan: Understanding the Power of Genes

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on genetics students will discuss new scientific information about genes; consider how that information is changing thoughts about human behavior and scientific research; and write essays about how information about genetics affects private homes, the research laboratory, and hospitals and clinics.

17. Lesson Plan: Genetic Engineering

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson on genetics students will: discover ethical issues surrounding the practice of genetic engineering in reproductive medicine; and understand key terms and concepts related to the science of genetic engineering.

18. Lesson Plan: Nature versus Nurture

Discovery Education, a division of Discovery Communications, provides a Lesson Plans Library of hundreds of original lesson plans written by teachers for teachers for elementary, middle, and high school students. Some lesson plans include suggestions for adaptations for older or younger audiences. Borrow them as-is or use them to spark your own lesson plans. In this lesson, students will learn that environment can influence some personality traits, while others are genetic; understand that the most effective way to study the concept of nature versus nurture is by conducting research with identical and fraternal twins reared separately and together; and discover that the issues of nature versus nurture are still debated in the scientific community.