Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 12, August 2015

August 12, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,202 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we have been continuing our summer housekeeping. We’ve been busy checking and updating each link on the site. To our dismay, we discovered that some links have disappeared entirely — especially videos (due to copyright infringements) and instructor’s class slides and web pages (probably due to retirement or changing jobs). This serves as a good reminder that any materials you use from the Internet may disappear or move so you should find a way to capture, print, copy, and/or download your favorites so that you can always have access to them.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Pixar’s “Inside Out” is a Surprisingly Accurate Look at Human Psychology —- Here’s What it Gets Right and Wrong.

Applies psychological theory and research to the movie “Inside Out” and describes what aspects of human psychology they got right (e.g., sleep consolidating memories, reframing memories, emotional complexity) what they got sort of right (e.g., core memories, personality islands) and what they just made up (e.g., imagination land). From “Business Insider”, June 23, 2015.

3. This Facial Expression Appears More Trustworthy To Others

According to research by Hehman, Flake, and Freeman (2015) in the “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here for PsyBlog, “A neutral face with a slightly upturned mouth and eyebrows makes people look more trustworthy, a new study finds. [But] the same neutral face with a slightly angry expression is seen as less trustworthy.”

4. This Fascinating TED Talk Shows Why You Have No Idea What Will Make You Happy in 10 Years

In his 2014 TED talk, Harvard social psychologist Daniel Gilbert explains “the end of history illusion” where “people are unable to anticipate just how much they’ll change in the future — even though they can appreciate how much they’ve grown in the past. So, at every age, you think the person you are today is the person you’ll be for the rest of your life.” Runs 6 minutes, 50 seconds.

5. CHIPTS: Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services

CHIPTS maintains this extensive list of links to 203 questionnaires for practitioners and researchers, many of them related to personality including:
Sub-Categories: Attachment, Coping Strategies, Health Efficacy, Life Outcomes, Mental Health, Perceived Vulnerability/Susceptibility, Personal Traits, Quality of Life, Religious/Spiritual, Self-efficacy, Sexual Attitudes, Social and much, much more.

6. College Social Life Can Predict Well-Being at Midlife

It’s well known that being socially connected promotes a person’s overall and psychological health. A new study now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 — and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 — can benefit her well-being later in life.

7. Your Musical Tastes Reflect Your Thinking Style

A study by David Greenberg and colleagues published in PLOS ONE, shows that the way someone thinks – his or her cognitive style – is a better predictor of the songs they’ll like than is their personality type. From Discover Magazine, July 24, 2015.

8. Keeping Up That Positive Feeling: The Science of Savoring Emotions

Savoring a beautiful sunset and the positive emotions associated with it can contribute to improved well-being, according to research. But why and how are some people better than others in keeping the feeling alive? From Science Daily, July 21, 2015.

9. The Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS)

The PANAS is based upon research demonstrating that self-reported mood states can be effectively classified on two dimensions. Each PANAS scale comprises ten specific mood-related adjectives rated on five-point scales of frequency over a two-week period.

10. State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)

The STAI is a validated 20 item self report assessment device which includes separate measures of state and trait anxiety. Recommended for studying anxiety in research and clinical settings.

11. Global Attachment: Relationship Scales Questionnaire (RSQ)

The RSQ is a 30-item questionnaire requiring participants to rate, on a 7-point scale, the extent to which each statement describes their characteristic style in close relationships (1 = not at all like me, 7 = very much like me). Items are summed to create two subscales, corresponding to the dimensions of avoidance and anxiety. Developed by Griffin, D., & Bartholomew, K. (1994).

12. Janis Self-Esteem Scale

Jannis, I. L., & Field, P. B. (1959). The Jannis and Field personality questionnaire. In C. I. Hovland & I. L. Jannis (Eds), Personality and persuasibility (pp. 300). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

13. The Pros and Cons of Being a Night Owl Instead of a Morning Person

While some research has found that early birds tend to have more positive social traits, such as optimism, night owls may have their own distinct advantages as well. From “Business Insider”, June 23, 2015.

14. Sexual Attitudes

Links to 8 measures of sexual attitudes including attitudes towards abstinence, sexual risks scale, sexual self-concept questionnaire and more.

15. How To Measure Circadian Rhythms in Humans

From Wirz-Justice, A. (2007). How to measure circadian rhythms in humans. Medicographia, 29(1), 84-90. Provides an overview of the topic with vivid examples and graphics. Opens in PDF.

16. How to Stop Procrastinating in 2 Easy Steps

Describes the work of Katy Milkman on “temptation bundling” in which behaviors we should do but procrastinate on are bundled with activities we’re tempted to do. Together, people are better able to exert their self-control to do what must be done and procrastinate less.

17. Researchers Discovered a Psychological Trick That Will Help You Stop Procrastinating
http://www.businessinsider.com/psychological-trick-to-stop-procrastinating-2015-7

“Psychologists have figured out a ridiculously easy trick to combat your tendency to put things off: Break them up into smaller pieces. The idea is that you’ll get a thrill out of checking those individual items off your to-do list and, before you know it, you’ll have completed the whole project.” From “Business Insider”, July 8, 2015.

18. College Social Life Can Predict Well-being at Midlife

It’s well known that being socially connected promotes a person’s overall and psychological health. A new study now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 — and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 — can benefit her well-being later in life. From “ScienceDaily”, July 23, 2015.

19. Research Suggests There are 4 Types of Introverts — Find Out Which Best Describes You

According to new research, there are four different kinds of introversion: social, thinking, anxious, and restrained. From “Business Insider”, July 1, 2015.

20. Exploring Bioethics

The National Institutes of Health provide this Curriculum Supplement on Exploring Bioethics for grades 9-12: “Students use a new model for ethical inquiry to develop thoughtful positions on complex bioethical issues. The supplement’s six modules each contain three 45-minute class periods of lessons on a specific issue.” Includes modules on balancing individual and community claims, allocating scarce resources, weighing benefits and harms of genetic testing, research ethics, and human responsibilities toward animals.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: How to Search APA’s Research Databases

Anne Breitenbach, APA Publications & Databases, put together this primer describing the host of free teaching tools for psychology research that are perfect for undergraduate students, [including] video tutorials, training webinars and reference guides that will help students learn how to efficiently search scholarly research databases, [and] website materials, podcasts and topic guides that will help them explore psychology and human behavior.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 11, July 2015

July 22, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,179 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you no doubt have heard of this summer’s hit movie “Inside Out”. This charming movie depicts life inside the head of 11-year old Riley focusing on her emotions personified by different characters and grounded in psychological theory and research.

Turns out, social-personality psychologist and emotion researcher Dacher Keltner is long time friends with Pixar director Pete Docter. The two became intrigued by the mysterious ways of emotions in their own kids (according to link #3 below). Keltner explains that pre-teens often experience a drop in happiness and a rise in anxiety. “It’s like the world crashes down on them,” Keltner said. The movie traces that shift, with tear-inducing as well as laugh-inducing effects.

Keltner was joined by facial expressions expert psychologist Paul Ekman in working with the Pixar team to portray childhood emotions, memory and character development in a scientifically sound way. The result speaks for itself. We here at Personality Pedagogy urge you to take you and your little friends to see this family-friendly movie, if you haven’t already done so.

Also new this month, it was announced that work has begun on a new film depicting Viktor Frankl’s account of his experience during the Holocaust. Frankl’s book “Man’s Search for Meaning” is being adapted by screenwriter Adam Gibgot. Gibgot explains, “The movie is about the best and worst of humanity, but how out of the worst the best can emerge.”

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Science of Sadness And Joy: ‘Inside Out’ Gets Childhood Emotions Right
The hit of the summer of 2015, “Inside Out”, depicts life for an 11-year old girl. Much of the film takes place inside her mind, in a control center staffed by five emotions personified: Joy, Sadness, Fear, and Disgust. Read about the science behind the movie and the contributions of psychologists Dacher Keltner and Paul Ekman who were consultants to the film.

3. ’Inside Out’ Movie Reflects the Realities and Fantasies of Neuroscience
Kids and the general public may be learning about how the brain and emotions work from an unlikely source: the hit movie “Inside Out” (2015). This article takes a look at the science behind the movie.

4. The Harry Potter Personality Test
According to a study published in the journal “Personality and Individual Differences” a person’s preferred Hogwart’s house from the fictional Harry Potter series may be related to their personality traits.

5. What it Means to Come Out in the Transgender Community
Inspired by the recent debut of Caitlyn Jenner on the June 2015 cover of “Vanity Fair” magazine, “Time” ran this article explaining that the process of coming out as a transgendered person is not linear; it varies from person to person. From “Time”, June 2, 2015.

6. Epigenetics and Its Major Influence on Life
In this essay James D. Baird explains how the science of epigenetics is finding that genes aren’t our destiny despite popular thinking. “Brain Blogger”, June 11, 2015.

7. Group Memberships Boost Self-Esteem More Than Friends Alone
“Belonging to multiple groups that are important to you boosts self-esteem much more than having friends alone” according to research published in PLOS ONE and summarized here for “ScienceDaily”, June, 2015.

8. Abraham Maslow: Father of Modern Management
Presents an overview of Maslow’s theories including the hierarchy of needs, self-actualization, theory Z, peak experiences; a summary of his books; quotes; and other resources.

9. Muppet Wiki: Walter Mischel
Muppet Wiki is a collaborative encyclopedia for everything related to Jim Henson, Sesame Street, The Muppet Show, and The Muppets Studio. It includes this page on Walter Mischel and features the musical sketch “Good Things Come to Those Who Wait” illustrating the concept of delay of gratification.

10. Awaken: Fritz Perls
Presents an overview of Perls’ life and theory including links to articles and videos.

11. Fritz Perls Treats People With Demons
The video includes Fritz Perls treating a man with a psychosis and a women with grief from parent issues. (Runs 31 minutes, 29 seconds).

12. Fritz Perls: Spiritual Training
Fritz Perls speaks about how to use your spiritual energy. (Runs 1 minute 18 seconds.)

13. Fritz Perls Gestalt Segment
Fritz Perls recites the Gestalt prayer. (Runs 8 minutes 16 seconds.)

14. Fritz Perls on Gestalt Therapy
Fritz Perls speaks to students about Gestalt therapy, the self and spirit. (Runs 6 minutes 49 seconds.)

15. Fritz Perls Workshop
Excerpt from a Fritz Perls workshop. (Runs 1 minute 37 seconds.)

16. Frederick Perls: A Son’s Reflections
From the webpage: “In celebration of the centennial of the birth of Frederick Perls, The Gestalt Journal invited his son Stephen, to address our Fifteenth Annual Conference on the Theory and Practice of Gestalt Therapy. Dr. Perls delivered this talk on the morning of April 23, 1993, at the Hotel du Parc in Montreal.”

17. The Gestalt Therapy Network
Includes digital forums for practitioners, students, and interested others; a directory of practitioners; and a comprehensive bibliography.

18. Night Owl or Morning Lark?
Should you pull an all-nighter or wake up early to study? This blog post reviews the evidence and concludes that it all depends on your chronotype.

19. The Perils of Novelty Seeking
World-class endurance athlete, coach, author, and political activist Christopher Bergland reviews the concept of Novelty Seeking, how it relates to the Big Five, and how sometimes the need for novelty may lead to extreme sports, ultra-endurance, and ultimately life-threatening experiences.

20. Desperately Seeking Sensation: Fear, Reward, and the Human Need for Novelty
“Sensation-seeking, the tendency to seek out novel experiences, is a general personality trait that has been extensively studied in psychological research, but neuroscience is just beginning to take aim at it.”

21. Novelty and the Brain: Why New Things Make Us Feel So Good
“We all like shiny new things, whether it’s a new gadget, new city, or new job. In fact, our brains are made to be attracted to novelty—and it turns out that it could actually improve our memory and learning capacity. The team at social sharing app Buffer explains how.” From LifeHacker, May 21, 2013.

22. Better Get to Work: Procrastination May Harm Heart Health
New evidence suggests that chronic procrastinators may be more vulnerable to serious health conditions like cardiovascular disease and hypertension. From the Association for Psychological Science, May 5, 2015.

23. Attachment Training
Alan Sroufe and June Sroufe provide information about attachment in the John Bowlby-Mary Ainsworth tradition and training in the assessment of attachment across the lifespan along with a primer on attachment theory, a list of suggested basic readings, and more.

24. An Attachment Primer: Fundamentals of Attachment Theory
Presents a brief overview of attachment theory.

25. Favorite Link Revisited: The British Museum of Science on Emotions
The British National Museum of Science has an extensive interactive web site. This online exhibit on recognizing emotions, emotions and the brain, faking emotional expression, animal emotions, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 9, May 2015

May 12, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,153 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

We’re keeping the newsletter short and sweet this month, as many of you are winding down your semesters, getting reading for the end of the academic year, or even preparing your summer courses. Don’t forget that the Personality Pedagogy website has a search function. Give it a shot and see what new information you might discover!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. The Top 20 Principles for Pre-K to 12 Education
According to the American Psychological Association, “Psychological science has much to contribute to enhancing teaching and learning in the everyday classroom by providing key insights on effective instruction, classroom environments that promote learning, and the appropriate use of assessment — including data, tests, measurement and research methods that inform practice.” In this report, the APA presents the 20 most important principles from psychology that would be of greatest use in pre-K to 12 classroom teaching and learning. The report focuses on five areas of psychological functioning including: Cognition and learning: How do students think and learn?; Motivation: What motivates students?; Social context and emotional dimensions: Why are social context, interpersonal relations and emotional well-being important to student learning?; Context and learning: How can the classroom best be managed?; and Assessment: How can teachers assess student progress?.

3. How Our View of What Makes Us Happy Has Changed in 80 Years
“Our view of what makes us happy has changed markedly since 1938. That is the conclusion of the psychologist who has recreated a famous study of happiness conducted in Bolton in 1938”, summarized here in “ScienceDaily”, May 4, 2015.

4. World Happiness Report 2015 Ranks Happiest Countries
The report, which includes analyses from experts in economics, neuroscience, and statistics outlines the happiest countries, changes in happiness from last year, and how measurements of subjective well-being can be used to assess national progress. Results are broken out by country, gender, age, and region. “Six key variables explain three-quarters of the variation in annual national average scores over time and among countries: real GDP per capita, healthy life expectancy, having someone to count on, perceived freedom to make life choices, freedom from corruption, and generosity.”

5. Avoid Procrastination: Funky Tip Makes You Start 4 Times Sooner
New research by Daphna Oyserman and colleagues find that “thinking about upcoming goals in terms of days rather than months or years motivates action”. Researchers suspect that this trick makes people feel closer to their future selves. The research was published in the journal “Psychological Science” and summarized here for “PsyBlog”, May 5, 2015.

6. Face It, Recover the Self to Recover from Break-Up
According to Gary Lewandowski for the “Science of Relationships” website “repairing one’s self-concept post-breakup should be a priority for anyone hoping to cope with relationship loss. Though published research has not explicitly examined the potential benefits of self-concept repair following break-up, these results suggest that activities that help fill in lost elements of the self, or help rediscover aspects of the self that were minimized or diminished during the relationship, may be useful.” Posted April 15, 2015.

7. How Your Brain Reacts to Emotional Information is Influenced by Your Genes
According to research published in the “Journal of Neuroscience” and summarized here for “ScienceDaily” “Your genes may influence how sensitive you are to emotional information … carriers of a certain genetic variation perceived positive and negative images more vividly, and had heightened activity in certain brain regions.” Posted May 7, 2015.

8. Locating the Brain’s Seasonal Affective (SAD) Center
According to research published in “Current Biology” and summarized here for “ScienceDaily”, “Biologists have known that variations in the amount of sunlight a person receives and her or his circadian clock play a role in the disorder. They have also proposed that the neurotransmitters serotonin and melatonin may be involved. However, they have not yet identified the underlying neurobiological mechanisms responsible. Biologists have now localized the seasonal light cycle effects that drive seasonal affective disorder to a small region of the brain called the dorsal raphe nucleus.” Posted May 7, 2015.

9. The Jigsaw Classroom
“The jigsaw classroom is a research-based cooperative learning technique invented and developed in the early 1970s by Elliot Aronson and his students at the University of Texas and the University of California. Since 1971, thousands of classrooms have used jigsaw with great success.” This website contains directions, tips, history, and background information and more.

10. Favorite Link Revisited: Personality Disorders in the Media
The Psychology in Action webpage, presents this look at famous characters who may fit the criteria of a personality disorder. Summarizes the criteria and the evidence for schizoid, schizotypal, antisocial, borderline, histrionic, narcissistic, and dependent personality disorders. Posted October, 2013.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 8, April 2015

April 30, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,139 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Though the semester is winding down around here, this newsletter brings you some of the latest links for teaching personality and keeping up with research findings in the field of personality. From Viktor Frankl to Neuroscience at the movies, from how much money MBTI types make to testing and attachment, there is sure to be something to inspire you below. Even if you are drowning in grading!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Neuro Psi Fi: The Brain Science Behind the Movies

Neuropsychologist Mary V. Spiers of Drexel University created and maintains this web page dedicated to show the brain science behind brain disorders and special abilities such as amnesia, autism, Tourette’s Syndrome, and others as illustrated in popular films. The page includes neuropsychological movie reviews in which the accuracy of the information portrayed in the film is evaluated in light of current research, and also brain resources, a blog, teaching resources, and more.

3. How We Elevate Each Other: Viktor Frankl on the Human Spirit and Why Idealism Is the Best Realism

In an excerpt from a 1972 lecture at the University of Toronto, Viktor Frankl “brimming with his humble wisdom and disarming wit… makes a beautiful case for believing in each other and viewing the human spirit with hope rather than cynicism.” Runs 4 minutes, 21 seconds.

4. The Weirdest Way People Communicate Their Happiness

Why is happiness so infectious? A new study published in the journal “Psychological Science” finds that people communicate their happiness to others through perspiration. Read about the study here in “PsyBlog”, April 17, 2015.

5. The Feeling That Expands Time and Increases Well-Being

Awe “that jaw-dropping moment when coming across something surprising, powerful, beautiful or even sublime can have a transformative effect” according to new research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here in “PsyBlog”, April 16, 2015.

6. 7 Science-Backed Signs You Work for a Narcissist

Research suggests that you are more likely to find a narcissist in the corner office than just about anywhere else. Find out why in this article from the “Business Insider”, April 27, 2015.

7. Is 10% of the Population Really Gay?

“Drawing on the widest survey of sexual behaviour since the Kinsey Report, David Spiegelhalter, in his book “Sex By Numbers”, answers key questions about our private lives. Here he reveals how Kinsey’s contested claim that 10% of us are gay is actually close to the mark”. From “The Guardian”, April 5, 2015.

8. The Personality Types That Make the Most Money

According to Truity Psychometrics, your Myers-Briggs personality type correlates with how much money you earn. Check out their graphic in “Business Insider”, April 20, 2015.

9. The Weird Psychological Reason Why Big Bonuses Can Demotivate Workers

“Given a choice between solving puzzles for free or for pay — which would you pick?” Based on Self-Determination Theory the answer may surprise you. Read about Autonomy and Competence here along with a third factor, Purpose, added by Daniel Pink. From “Business Insider”, April 7, 2015. You can hear Daniel Pink’s TED talk on the difference between incentivizing and intrinsic motivation here too (runs 18 minutes, 36 seconds).

10. Morning People (“Larks”) Are More Punctual Than “Owls”

Larks arrived more punctually than Owls to their morning lectures according to research published in “Current Psychology” and summarized here for The British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, March 16, 2015.

11. 3 More Reasons You Can’t Win With a Narcissist

A narcissist, a “profoundly selfish person who lacks empathy, makes you feel small and robs you of the happiness you deserve” can be difficult to deal with for these and other reasons. From “PsychCentral”, April 19, 2015.

12. People Are Overly Optimistic About the Benefits of Optimism

“This work doesn’t suggest that optimism is ineffective as a broad strategy for approaching life, or at helping us fulfill objectives at a broad scale. But it does suggest that we put more on the shoulders of optimism that it can bear” according to research published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” and summarized here for the British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, April 29, 2015.

13. Extraversion May Be Less Common Than We Think

New research suggests that Extrovert are over-represented in our social networks, which may overestimate the prevalence of extroversion in the population. This, according to research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here for “Science Daily”, April 6, 2015.

14. I (Don’t) Want 2 B w/ U: Texting, Sexting, and Avoidant Attachment

“Those who are high in avoidance tend to be uncomfortable with intimacy, want less closeness in their relationships, and distrust others more. And when it comes to electronic communication with partners, it turns out that avoidance also is related texting and sexting behaviors, but in different ways.” This, according to the Benjamin Le writing for “The Science of Relationships”, April 13, 2015.

15. Writing Exercises Scientifically Proven to Redirect Your Life

Inspired by the research of Timothy Wilson and others, writing exercises, like distancing yourself from negative experiences or determining what your best possible self looks like, may be beneficial according to Jane Porter writing for “Fast Company”, February 11, 2015.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: A Guide to Writing Learning Objectives for Teachers of Psychology (2012)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to announce this new resource for teachers by Guy A. Boysen of the State University of New York at Fredonia and McKendree University. The purpose of this 18-page resource is to assist psychology teachers in (a) understanding key terms related to objectives and their assessment, (b) writing behavior-based learning objectives, and (c) evaluating objectives once they are written. The resource includes a table that illustrates how various psychology outcomes can be addressed with objectives at various levels of Bloom’s taxonomy.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 7, March 2015

April 8, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,131 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The big news in the world of personality psychology is the opening of the Viktor Frankl Museum in his former residence in Vienna, Austria. The museum features exhibits, classes, lectures, and events. Check out the link below!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Viktor Frankl Museum

Frankl’s former residence in Vienna, Austria is now home to the Worldwide Viktor Frankl Museum. The museum features exhibits, classes, lectures, and events and “in the course of learning about the development of a genius, visitors also gain insight into their own opportunities and personal potential.”

3. Most Good People Have the Same Basic Life Story

“Psychology research verifies that the stories we tell ourselves matter. A new study from Northwestern University shows that folks who fit the classic mold of “good people” — those who care about others while also having high well-being and mental health — have life stories that share remarkably similar narrative arcs” according to research by Dan Mcdams and Jen Guo and summarized here for “Business Insider”, March 13, 2015.

4. Parents Make Nasty Little Narcissists?

Check out this research “that implies the Earth may have a few less narcissistic, self-centered personalities populating it if parents ditch overvaluing their child’s super-awesomeness to prevent them from potentially growing up into pedestal loving, manipulative, selfie-obsessed, nasty little narcissists” according to research by Eddie Brummelman and colleagues and summarized here by Carla Clark for “Brain Blogger”, March 9, 2015.

5. Men or Women? No Surprise Which Gender is More Narcissistic

Men are more narcissistic than women, on average, according to a new study published in the journal “Psychological Bulletin” by Emily Grijalva and colleagues and summarized here by Jeremy Dean for “PsyBlog”, March 5, 2015.

6. New Work Schedule Could Cure Your “Social Jetlag”

“Many of us are walking around all the time in a fog caused by ‘social jetlag.’ That’s what happens when we lose sleep because our daily schedules don’t match our bodies’ natural rhythms. The condition can be a particular problem for shift workers, who work into the night or on a shifting schedule. Now, researchers report that sleep and workers’ wellbeing could be improved if schedules took workers’ biological clocks into account.” This, according to new research by Till Roenneberg and published in the journal “Current Biology” and summarized here for “Science Daily”, March 12, 2015.

7. All About Awe: Science Explores How Life’s Small Marvels Elevate Cognition and Emotion

“The truly awesome encounters in life don’t reside in the everyday but rather in the experiences we have that are somehow magnificent and powerful. As cutting-edge research in psychological science is beginning to show […] that awe, though mysterious, is an emotion we shouldn’t take for granted, as it may have surprisingly meaningful consequences for everyday behavior and even overall well-being.” From The “APS Observer”, Volume 28 (4), April 2015.

8. An Upbeat Emotion That’s Surprisingly Good for You

“A new study singles out one surprising emotion as a potent medicine: awe. And happily, awe seems to be much easier to come by than many might expect, even for the busy and stressed-out. This, according to research by Dacher Keltner and colleagues published in the journal “Emotion” and summarized here for the New York Times, March 26, 2015.

9. The Lifetime Effects of Self-Control in Childhood

“In following a cohort of individuals from birth to their late 30s, Terrie Moffitt and her colleagues found that children who scored low on a variety of self-control measures at age 3 were more likely as adults to have criminal records, addictions, welfare dependency, low financial savings, bad credit ratings, and health problems compared with those who scored high on self-control as toddlers.” Watch her keynote address at the inaugural International Convention of Psychological Science in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, March 13, 2015 in this video. Runs 49 minutes and 2 seconds.

10. Favorite Link Revisited: Viktor Frankl

e-Textbook From the electronic textbook created for undergraduate and graduate courses in Personality Theories by George Boeree of Shippensburg University.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 6, February 2015

March 5, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,124 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we present a short newsletter for a short month. Enjoy!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Genetics: Do Your Hands Have Family Traits?

Check out these two projects from Science Buddies: “In these hands-on genetics projects and activities, students investigate a family pedigree to see if they can determine whether traits are dominant or recessive. Do you and some (or all) of your family members share certain physical traits? Is a widow’s peak passed down from generation to generation? Find out!”

3. The Association Method

“Originally published in the Collected Papers on Analytical Psychology in 1916, The Association Method was the first of three lectures Carl Jung delivered at the celebration of the twentieth anniversary of the opening of Clark University in September, 1909.”

4. Jung on Meeting Freud

Carl G. Jung discusses his first encounter with Sigmund Freud (runs 37 seconds).

5. A Navy SEAL Explains 8 Secrets to Grit and Resilience

Eric Barker of the “Barking Up The Wrong Tree” blog presents this look into how reality compares to the theory of grit and resilience.

6. Extroverts Come in Two Different Types Brain Scans Reveal

New research finds evidence for brain differences between agentic extroverts (the outgoing, persistent, assertive, achievement-focused extroverts) and affiliative extroverts (the affectionate, friendly, and sociable extroverts).

7. Introverts Prefer Mountains

“In a series of three studies, researchers tested whether there is a link between [the five factors of] personality and an aspect of physical ecology: flat terrain versus mountainous terrain.”

8. The Emotion Which Has a Wonderful Protective Effect on Mind and Body

“Positive emotions, especially the feeling of awe, have been linked to lower levels of inflammatory cytokines by a new study [which] suggests that the positive feeling from enjoying the beauty of nature or getting lost in a painting or symphony can actually help protect the body against heart disease, arthritis, depression, and even Alzheimer’s disease.” The research was done by Jennifer Stellar,  Neha John-Henderson, Craig L. Anderson, Amie M. Gordon, Galen D. McNeil, and Dacher Keltner,  and published in the journal “Emotion”.

9. Coming Out Exercise

Barry A. Schreier of Purdue University developed this exercise to “assist individuals with the experience of loss that is often associated with Coming Out. Loss can come in many ways from the loss of a job, the loss of friends and family members, the loss of autonomy, loss of affiliation with others, and so on. This exercise is used to access the vital emotional components of participants’ belief and attitude systems in the efforts of creating greater inclusivity in attitude and belief for people who are Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual”

10. Favorite Link Revisited: Jung Speaks

PsicoMundo, a Spanish language website about psychoanalysis, has two audio clips in their Galería de Sonidos (Gallery of Sounds) of Carl Jung speaking (the clips are in English). Fragmento 1 (Fragment 1) is 16 seconds, Fragmento 2 (Fragment 2) is 23 seconds. They are available for listening (para escuchar) on line or off line.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 1, September 2014

September 11, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,061 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Like us, we’re sure many of you are in the full swing of a new semester and a new school year. We’ll keep this newsletter short and sweet so you can go back to preparing your classes.

Special thanks go out this month to Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania who put together a PowerPoint presentation to help students use flashcards more effectively as a study tool. Their presentation is based on (a) what psychologists know about concept formation and (b) what psychologist know about memory. You can download via the link below. We thank them for giving Personality Pedagogy the opportunity to publish their presentation. Check it out!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Beyond Rote Memorization: New Ways to Use Flashcards to Learn, Remember, and Understand Concepts

Students often use flashcards, but they often do not use them effectively. This Powerpoint, created by Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania, shows students how to make and study flashcards effectively. Instructors can use this Powerpoint as a presentation or they can assign it to students as a tutorial. If used as a tutorial, professors can have students print out a results page that will tell professors how long students spent on the tutorial and how well they did on a quiz over the tutorial. Requires PowerPoint 2010 or later and, when prompted, users should choose to enable macros.

3. Freud’s City, From Couch to Cafes

Stephen Heyman, writing for ‘’The New York Times’’ researched and visited many of Freud’s favorite haunts in a city which he both loved and hated. From the cafe where the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society met to Leopoldstadt, the Jewish quarter in Freud’s day, to a medical history museum and Schloss Bellevue where Freud interpreted his first dream, Heyman describes places in Vienna where one can go to appreciate the import and life of Sigmund Freud.

4. The Mistake Everybody Makes With Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence isn’t just “being nice to people” nor is it unequivocally a good thing. This info graphic vividly illustrates what emotional intelligence is . . . and isn’t. From ”Business Insider”, August 18, 2014.

5. What Your Facebook Photos Say About Your Personality

According to research by Azar Eftekhar and colleagues, extroverts and people high in Neuroticism upload significant numbers of photos. However Extroverts tend to change their profile cover photos while people high in Neuroticism upload more photos per album. From ‘’Live Science’’, August 5, 2014.

6. The Best Jobs For Every Personality Type

This info graphic presents the five best jobs for each type of personality according to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Personality Test. From ”Business Insider”, September 4, 2014.

7. Can Fiction Stories Make Us More Empathetic?

‘’Exposure to narrative fiction may improve our ability to understand what other people are thinking or feeling, a researcher reports. Many stories are about people — their mental states, their relationships. The researcher explains that we understand stories using basic cognitive functions, and there is not a special module in the brain that allows us to do this. Understanding stories is similar to the way we understand the real world.’’ From ‘’Science Daily’’, August 11, 2014.

8. 4 Tips For Becoming Emotionally Resilient

Emotional resilience can be learned and this article presents 4 ways to help develop it. From ‘’Psych Central’’, September 11, 2014.

9. Epigenetics: Genes, Environment and The Generation Game
According to this article from ‘’The Guardian’’, September 6, 2014, ‘’New research claims that environmental factors affect not just an individual’s genes but those of their offspring too. Diabetes, obesity – even certain phobias – may all be influenced by the behaviour of our forebears’’.

10. How Trauma Can Help You Grow

Post-traumatic growth can help help survivors of traumatic events cope with their pain and recover from traumatic events. From ‘’U.S. News & World Report’’, September 8, 2014.

11. Reacting to Personal Setbacks: Do You Bounce Back or Give Up?

‘’Sometimes when people get upsetting news – such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review – they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened’’ according to new research mapping brain activity using fMRI scans published in the journal ‘’Neuron’’ and summarized here in ‘’Science Daily’’, September 4, 3014.

12. Science Explains Why Comedies Are Funnier When You See Them in a Crowded Theater

Research published in the journal ‘’Emotion’’ suggests that group attention intensifies emotions relative to attending alone. From ‘’Discover Magazine’’, September 2, 2014.

13. Favorite Link Revisited: The Science of Compassion and Resilience

Psychologist David DeSteno examines the science of compassion and resilience exploring new ideas for leveraging the mechanisms of the mind that enable them according to Maria Popova for Brain Pickings, October 22, 2012. Runs 18 minutes, 28 seconds.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 11, July 2014

July 22, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,030 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This has been a good month for personality psychologists and teachers of personality psychology. News sources and social media have been buzzing with interesting findings directly related to personality psychology. Perhaps you’ve heard about the infamous Facebook study on emotional contagion or seen the Verizon ad illustrating the social factors which can undermine young girls’ achievements in science and math? Or, like, um, you know, how that annoying “Teenspeak” language is actually related to personality or how friends share similar genes? And, have you ever wondered about the attachment style of contestants on the TV reality shows “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette”? Yes, we have all this and more for you in this month’s newsletter.

This month we have added a new page on “Testing and Personnel Selection”. This includes many links that were previously included in the “Tests and Measurement” page, which, by the way, is now named “Personality Assessment” to better reflect the current state of the field.

Quick, grab your favorite chilled drink, browse the links below and place your bets on how “The Bachelorette” will end next Monday, secure in your knowledge of personality!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Virtuous Cycles: Night Owls and Early Birds

New research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here by Wray Herbert suggests that there is an interaction between cognitive depletion and circadian fluctuations in tiredness. That is, people are more likely to cheat when they experience low energy, i.e., a dip in their biological clock. This suggests that early birds are likely to make bad choices later in the day and nights owls earlier in the day.

3. Powerful Ad Shows What A Little Girl Hears When You Tell Her She’s Pretty

According to the National Science Foundation, 66% of 4th grades girls say they like math and science, yet women make up only 18% of engineering majors in college. This Verizon commercial illustrates the social cues which may discourage girls from math and science during their early childhood. Runs 1 minute and 3 seconds.

4. Resilience: Motorcyclist Thrown After Crash, Walks Away

“I can either land on my feet or my head right now” is what was going through the mind of 24 year old Michael Smith as he was hit by a car while riding his motorcycle through an intersection in Florida. Amazingly, he flips head-over-heels, lands on his feet, and walks away. Runs 51 seconds.

5. The Secret of Effective Motivation

Psychologists Amy Wrzesniewski and Barry Schwartz summarize their research of the internal or instrumental motives of Cadets at the United States West Point Military Academy: “Our study suggests that efforts should be made to structure activities so that instrumental consequences do not become motives. Helping people focus on the meaning and impact of their work, rather than on, say, the financial returns it will bring, may be the best way to improve not only the quality of their work but also — counterintuitive though it may seem — their financial success.” From, “The New York Times”, July 4, 2014.

6. The Conscientiousness of Kidspeak

The “like”s and “you know”s ubiquitous in the language of 12-14 year olds are not, as parents bemoan, due to “sloppy indifference” but rather to “undue scrupulousness”. According to research by linguists at the University of Texas, youth high in Conscientiousness use these markers to signal that they have left out the details of what they are relating for the sake of economy. By Adam Gopnik for “The New Yorker”, July 20 2014.

7. Study Cracks How Brain Processes Emotions

From the website: “Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code [of neural activation] that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new study. “Despite how personal our feelings feel, the evidence suggests our brains use a standard code to speak the same emotional language,” one researcher concludes.” From “ScienceDaily”, July 9, 2014.

8. Research Ethics: The Facebook Experiment: Reaction From Psychologists

According to former psychology professor Michael Britt in his podcast “The Psych Files”: “You’ve probably heard about the controversy over the Facebook manipulation of user’s News Feeds and the (possible) effect this had on user’s emotions. In the latest episode of The Psych Files I summarize the study and my conclusions about it. Also included on the website is a (large) concept map that also summarizes the study, links to references and Facebook’s official response. Also included in the map and the episode: suggestions for students regarding how a proper informed consent form might have been written and presented to students.” Episode 22, July 1, 2014. Runs 33 minutes and 16 seconds.

9. Do Friends Have Similar Genomes?

According to research by James Fowler and Nicholas Christakis, “We are more genetically similar to our friends than we are to strangers. […] Looking at differences between nearly 2,000 people, recruited as part of a heart study in a small US town, they found that friends shared about 0.1% more DNA, on average, than strangers.” From “BBC News”, July 15, 2014.

10. 7 Ways You Can Easily Increase Your Willpower

Eric Barker of the “Barking Up The Wrong Tree” blog presents these 7 evidence-based ways of increasing your willpower in your daily life. July 20, 2014.

11. 11 Interview Questions Hiring Managers Ask To Test Your Personality

From the website: “In an effort to find new hires that are great cultural fits, employers are putting more emphasis on soft skills, or intangible qualities […] some qualities that are a good indication of success in a role include organizational and communication skills, great team player, strong leadership skills, an ability to think on your feet, drive, and initiative.” From “Business Insider”, June 11, 2014.

12. Here’s How Amazing Leaders Adapt to Crazy Situations

According to research by clinical psychologist Leslie Patch, personality profiling of executives at GE, McDonald’s, Merrill Lynch, and more, found that active coping is the greatest predictor of managerial success. From “Business Insider”, June 20, 2014.

13. New Social Media Study Investigates Relationships Among Facebook Use, Narcissism and Empathy

A study by Tracy Alloway and colleagues and summarized here for “ScienceDaily” suggests that a some features of Facebook, like profile photos are linked to narcissism, while others, like chatting are linked to empathy. According to Alloway, “Every narcissist needs a reflecting pool. Just as Narcissus gazed into the pool to admire his beauty, social networking sites, like Facebook, have become our modern-day pool.” July 3, 2014.

14. What Attachment Style is The Bachelorette’s Andi Dorfman?

Erica Djossa writing for the “Science of Relationships” blog explains her evidence for why this latest eligible lady from the reality TV series may have secure attachment, even though secure attachment doesn’t make for “juicy reality TV”.

15. How Your Mood Changes Your Personality

Research by Jan Querengässer and Sebastian Schindler found “When participants answered questions about their personality in a sad state, they scored “considerably” higher on trait neuroticism, and “moderately” lower on extraversion and agreeableness, as compared with when they completed the questionnaire in a neutral mood state”. From “BPS Research Digest”, July 17, 2014.

16. Self-Motivation: How “You Can Do it!” Beats “I Can Do It”

Research by Sanda Dolcos and Dolores Albarracín published in the “European Journal of Social Psychology” and summarized here for the “BPS Research Digest” suggests that second-person self-talk (e.g., “You can do it!”) is more effective than first-person self-talk. The researchers surmised that second-person talk may be effective because it “cues memories of receiving support and encouragement from others, especially in childhood”. July 9, 2014.

17. Favorite Link Revisited: Making Connections: Social Issues in the Psychology Classroom

Susan Goldstein of the University of Redlands established and maintains this site to: provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum. The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources, pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies, and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 10, June 2014

June 19, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,012 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, to celebrate the end of the school year and the start of summer we present a mixed-bag of very interesting links: laughter, dog treats, extroverts on Mars, healthy eating, Legos, Leo Tolstoy and much, much more. We hope that these will inspire you to think about personality and your teaching of personality psychology in new ways over the summer.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Dogs Like Treats, But Here’s What Really Gets Their Tails Wagging

It’s autonomy and competence, according to a study published in “Animal Cognition” and summarized here for “The Huffington Post”. According to the researchers, “The experimental animals in our study were excited not only by the expectation of a reward, but also about realizing that they themselves could control their access to the reward.” Posted June 16, 2014.

3. Extroverts Don’t Belong on Mars

A new study by Suzanne Bell and colleagues and summarized here for “The Atlantic”, finds that Extroverts, with their outgoing personalities, may not be suited for long, isolated voyages. Better go with the strong, silent, Introverts instead. Posted June 13, 2014.

4. The Role of Personality and Psychology in Healthy Eating

Can an understanding of personality and the five factors in particular help people to eat healthier? Patrick Fagan writing for “PsychCentral” thinks so. Posted June 12, 2014.

5. The Power of Our Personal Stories

Margarita Tartakovsky, writing for “PsychCentral” explains how revising our stories and our perceptions of problems can empower us. Posted June 15, 2014.

6. Leo Tolstoy on Finding Meaning in a Meaningless World

Maria Popova for “Brain Pickings” describes how Leo Tolstoy experienced depression and suicidal thoughts which led to “A Confession”, his meditation on the meaning of life. Posted June, 2014.

7. Lego To Launch Female Scientists Series After Online Campaign

According to this news report, “Women in science are taking one tiny, plastic step forward after Lego announced on Tuesday it will launch a series of female scientists and their lab tools. The science-themed project was selected as the latest Lego Ideas winner, and is set to hit shelves in August 2014. The series – notably devoid of pink – includes an astronomer with a telescope, a paleontologist with a dinosaur skeleton and a chemist in a lab.” The project idea was submitted by Dr Ellen Kooijman, a geochemist in Stockholm. In her project proposal, Kooijman wrote: “The motto of these [s]cientists is clear: explore the world and beyond!”. From “The Guardian”, June 4, 2014.

8. Self-Affirmation: A Simple Exercise That Actually Helps

According to research published in the “Annual Review of Psychology” and summarized here for “PsychCentral”, one effective way of affirming our values and strengths is to revise our narratives. Published June 2, 2014.

9. How To Get A Narcissist to Feel Empathy

Narcissists can feel empathy if they put themselves in another person’s shoes according to research by Erica Hepper and colleagues, published in the “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here for “PsyBlog”, May 2014.

10. Laugh Often to Live Well

According to “Brain Blogger”: “Humor and mirth offer a multitude of preventive and healing effects and a new study is offering more evidence that laughter has quantifiable benefits for the brain”. Posted May 10, 2014.

11. Dog People vs. Cat People: Who’s More Outgoing? More Intelligent?

“Dog people and cat people really do have different personalities. People who said they were dog lovers in the study tended to be more lively — meaning they were more energetic and outgoing — and also tended to follow rules closely. Cat lovers, on the other hand, were more introverted, more open-minded and more sensitive than dog lovers. Cat people also tended to be non-conformists, preferring to be expedient rather than follow the rules.” This, according to research by Denise Guastello and colleagues and summarized here for “LiveScience”, May 27, 2014.

12. Hello Stranger

What happens when strangers are enticed to break the unwritten “no eye contact” rule? Positive emotions! Read about this research by Nicholas Epley and Juliana Schroeder in this piece from the “New York Times”, April 25, 2014.

13. Viktor Frankl on the Art of Presence As a Lifeboat in Turbulent Times and What Suffering Teaches Us About the Meaning of Life.

Maria Popova for “Brain Pickings” describes Frankl’s concept of presence which comes from “accepting [one’s] suffering as a task”. Posted March, 2014.

14. Thrill Seeker or Chill Seeker?

Ken Carter designed this online version of the Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking Scale. You can take the 40-item test and the site will tell you how you score overall and on the individual subscales of Boredom Susceptibility, Disinhibition, Experience Seeking, and Thrill & Adventure Seeking. Bonus: respondents’ results are combined to draw a map of sensation seeking scores around the world and within the United States.

15. Dr. Ken Carter

This web page of Clinical psychologist, speaker, and science writer Ken Carter contains many background resources on sensation seeking including audio and videos describing what sensation is and isn’t, links to a sensation seeking quiz, world heat maps of sensation seeing, press releases and more.

16. Resilience: Why It’s Vital and How to Enhance It

From the website: “You can’t always get what you want, but resilience helps you feel good anyways.”. From “Psychology Today”, June 6, 2013.

17. The Obstacle Is the Way

From the website: “the principle of changing poison into medicine explains that we can transform even the most horrific tragedy into the very thing we need to become happier than we currently are”. From “Psychology Today”, May 4, 2014.

18. Is There Hope for the Insecurely Attached?

Yes, according to Erica Djossa writing for “Science of Relationships”. In this piece she describes two categories of secure attachment: continuous secures and earned-secures. Earned-secures started out with an insecure attachment in infancy that developed into a secure attachment style later. This provides evidence for a secure buffering effect in which an insecure individual may come to show more secure attachment behaviors if they are in a relationship with a secure partner.

19. Here’s How Being Neurotic can Make you More Successful

Despite tendencies towards anxiety, depression, and mood swings, people who are high in Neuroticism tend to be strivers, whose proclivity for rumination may pay off in the right environment, like academia or knowledge-based work. From “Business Insider”, May 9, 2014.

20. Favorite Link Revisited: Electronic Texts Available on the Internet

Did you know that you can find electronic articles and writings free on the internet to supplement your personality course? Links to original writings by Sigmund Freud, Erik Erikson, Carl Jung, Kurt Lewin, Niccolò Machiavelli, Abraham Maslow, Henry Murray, Carl Rogers, B.F. Skinner and more including an e-textbook in Personality Psychology by George Boeree of Shippensburg University are available here at PersonalityPedagogy.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 9, May 2014

May 31, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,996 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are mourning the loss of Sandra Bem, feminist scholar and psychologist who died on May 20 just short of her 70th birthday. She will be remembered for her theoretical work and research on gender schema theory, the social construction of gender and sexuality, and her unconventional views on gender and child rearing.

Like many of our readers this month, we welcome the unofficial start of summer and the end of a semester (and school year!). We hope the summer is a time of rest and rejuvenation and we’ll be doing our best to keep the inspiration coming as you look ahead to teaching personality in a future semester.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Love Makes You Strong: Romantic Relationships Help Neurotic People Stabilize Their Personality

Romantic relationships can help young adults who are high in Neuroticism to become less anxious, insecure, and easily annoyed according to research by Christine Finn and colleagues in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for “Science Daily” May 9, 2014.

3. Rice Theory Explains North-South China Cultural Differences

From the page: “A new cultural psychology study has found that psychological differences between the people of northern and southern China mirror the differences between community-oriented East Asia and the more individualistic Western world — and the differences seem to have come about because southern China has grown rice for thousands of years, whereas the north has grown wheat.” From “Science Daily”, May 8, 2014.

4. Does Facebook Affect Our Self-Esteem, Sense of Belonging?

From the page: “With 1.11 billion users per month on average, Facebook has become a global phenomenon offering continual and direct communication with friends and family. Research into how social media websites define us socially, and the influence that social media has on our personal welfare, suggests that a lack of social participation on Facebook leads to people feeling less meaningful.” From “Science Daily”, May 8, 2014.

5. Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient

Sam Kean for “Slate” magazine provides this retelling of the Gage tale, this time with the debunking of some myths and with additional information demonstrating that “The true story of Phineas Gage is much more fascinating that the mythical textbook accounts”. Includes new computer models of Gage’s injury and how it may have affected his brain functioning.

6. I Want You To Know That I’m Tyrion Lannister

The Forer (Barnum) Effect has found a new home: The Internet Quiz. Writer Maria Konnikova suggests that the reason why we are so drawn to these obviously false personality quizzes may have to do with our fascination with the self and our fundamental need to belong. From “The New Yorker”, May 1, 2014.

7. This is the Personality Trait That Most Often Predicts Success

Writing for “Inc.” magazine, Drake Baer describes the research which demonstrates that being high in Conscientiousness will help you succeed in many domains of life across the life span. From May, 2014.

8. Teaching Sexual Orientation

Psychologist David G. Myers suggests ways of teaching controversial topics like sexual orientation by focusing on evidence-based conclusions and how psychologists might test whether social policies affect the health and well-being of gay people. From the APS “Observer”, 27(5), May/June, 2014.

9. Epigenetics 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Explaining Everything

Genetics researcher Cath Ennis wrote this primer for The Guardian newspaper explaining what epigenetics is and how it can help us understand human health and disease. Posted April 25, 2014.

10. Do we Get Nicer With Age?

Amy Kluber, for Newsy, reports on a study by Christopher Soto and colleagues which found that people who were happier at the start of the study become more emotionally stable, conscientious, agreeable and introverted as they matured over the course of the study demonstrating that personality changes with life events. Posted April 22, 2014. Runs 1 minute 34 seconds.

11. Cultivating Happiness Often Misunderstood

From the page: “The concept of maximizing happiness has been explored by researchers, who have found that pursuing concrete ‘giving’ goals rather than abstract ones leads to greater satisfaction. One path to happiness is through concrete, specific goals of benevolence — like making someone smile or increasing recycling — instead of following similar but more abstract goals — like making someone happy or saving the environment.” From “Science Daily”, April 15, 2014.

12. Outgoing Behavior Makes for Happier Humans: Across Cultures, Extroverts Have More Fun

From the page: “Happy is as happy does, apparently — for human beings all over the world. Not only does acting extroverted lead to more positive feelings across several cultures, but people also report more upbeat behavior when they feel free to be themselves.” From “Science Daily”, April 15, 2014.

13. Biological Evidence of Positive and Negative People in the World

From the page: “The ability to stay positive when times get tough — and, conversely, of being negative — may be hardwired in the brain, finds new research.” From “Science Daily”, April 2, 2014.

14. Computer Maps 21 Distinct Emotional Expressions — Even “Happily Disgusted”

From the page: “Researchers have found a way for computers to recognize 21 distinct facial expressions — even expressions for complex or seemingly contradictory emotions such as “happily disgusted” or “sadly angry.” The study more than triples the number of documented facial expressions that researchers can now use for cognitive analysis.” From “Science Daily”, March 31, 2014.

15. Favorite Link Revisited: The Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI)

According to the site: “The Bem Sex Role Inventory was developed in 1971 by Dr. Sandra Lipsitz Bem. It characterizes your personality as masculine, feminine, androgynous, or undifferentiated. The BSRI is based on gender stereotypes, so what it’s actually measuring is how well you fit into your traditional sex role. Thus, your score may say as much about how our cultural expectations have changed over the last 35 years as it does about your personality.” You can take the original 60-item scale and receive your scores automatically online here.