Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 5, January 2014

January 27, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,930 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy New Year! And for many of you, Happy New Semester! We have quite the newsy newsletter this month, starting with a strange and disturbing crime: vandals attempted to steal the ancient Greek urn containing the ashes of Sigmund Freud and his wife Martha Bernays. The vase was damaged in the process and is now kept in a more secure location.

Also, 2013 ended with an exciting and controversial new finding suggesting that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. But before you let the news go to your head (so to speak) check out the astute critique of the research and interpretation of the evidence by cognitive psychologist Christian Jarrett.

Finally, you may have noticed that we’ve spruced the place up a bit. We are in the process of adding photos and changing the page layout to make the site more readable.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Urn Containing Sigmund Freud’s Ashes Smashed During Theft Attempt

“Staff at the crematorium in Golders Green discovered broken pieces of the urn, which dates from around 300BC and came from Freud’s collection of antiquities, lying on the floor on New Year’s Day, after thieves apparently broke in overnight and smashed it in the attempt to steal it.” The severely damaged urn was subsequently moved to a secure location according to staff at the crematorium. From “The Guardian”, January 15, 2014.

3. Male and Female Brains Wired Differently, Scans Reveal

According to research by Madhura Ingalhalikar and colleagues and summarized here “Scientists have drawn on nearly 1,000 brain scans to confirm what many had surely concluded long ago: that stark differences exist in the wiring of male and female brains.” Evidence suggests that men’s brains have more connectivity within each hemisphere; women have more connectivity between the hemispheres. From “The Guardian”, December 2, 2013.

4. Getting in a Tangle Over Men’s and Women’s Brain Wiring

Christian Jarrett for “Brain Watch” takes a critical view of the research and the interpretation of the evidence suggesting that men’s and women’s brains are wired differently. Posted December 4, 2013.

5. Is Narcissism Essential for Success?

The Association for Psychological Science reports the results of a study which suggests that “While narcissists are more likely to garner leadership positions, there was no evidence of a link between narcissism and a leader’s success . . . the poorest leaders are those with either extremely high or extremely low levels of narcissism.” January 17, 2014.

6. B. F. Skinner at the APA Annual Convention 1990

“Behavioral psychologist Dr. B. F. Skinner presented this keynote address at the American Psychological Association’s 1990 Annual Convention. In Dr. Skinner’s last public appearance, he expresses his belief that the proper role for psychological science is the analysis of behavior. He speaks about the path psychology has followed over the years, from early introspection methods to three kinds of variation and selection, including natural selection, the evolution of operant conditioning, and the evolution of culture.” August 10, 1990. (in English with Spanish subtitles). Runs 20 minutes, 56 seconds.

7. Nicholas Claus: Big Five for the Big Guy

Heather A. Haas wrote this humorous “case study” of Santa Claus using the big five. Find out whether the big guy is high or low on Extraversion Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism and Openness and the “evidence” she used to make her judgements in “Dialogue”, the newsletter of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, volume 19 (1), Spring 2004, p. 24-25, 21.

8. Parents Sinking Some Kids With Their Puffed-up Praise, Study Finds

Research by Eddie Brummelman and colleagues suggests that “Moms and dads who bathe kids in exaggerated flattery to boost low self-esteem are stifling the very children they hope to elevate, a new study shows.” From “NBC News”, January 3, 2014.

9. Should Every Kid Get a Trophy Just for Participating?

SportzEdge.com presents this discussion by their commentators on whether children ought to get a trophy just for participating. Presents some interesting ideas to get your students thinking. Runs 7 minutes, 11 seconds.

10. Editing Your Life’s Stories Can Create Happier Endings

This piece from the NPR program “All Things Considered” uses the example of the author Lulu Miller’s nephew to illustrate the work of psychologist Tim Wilson. “Wilson has been studying how small changes in a person’s own stories and memories can help with emotional health. He calls the process “story editing” And he says small tweaks in the interpretation of life events can reap huge benefits.” From January 1, 2014. Includes a link to listen to the story, which runs 8 minutes, 54 second.

11. The Meaningful Life is a Road Worth Traveling

“A Stanford research project explored the key differences between lives of happiness and meaningfulness. While the two are similar, dramatic differences exist – and one should not underestimate the power of meaningfulness. “The quest for meaning is a key part of what makes us human,” ” Jennifer Aaker and her colleagues concluded. From the “Stanford News”, January 1, 2014.

12. A Case Study Using CBT

The Australian Institute of Professional Counselors presents this excerpt from a counseling session of an actual client to illustrate the four basic steps of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: identify the automatic thought, question the validity of the automatic thought, and challenge core beliefs. Posted March 22, 2010.

13. CBT in Action: A Case Study

Dr. Nicholas Jenner, a counseling psychologist, illustrates how the use of Daily Mood Sheets can help clients see the the feelings and emotions caused by a triggering event. He presents this case study of “Jodie” and how she was able to recognize her problematic thought patterns and where they came from through therapy.

14. Psychologists Put the ‘Selfie’ On the Couch

Psychologists Lisa Obran and Andrew Przybylski explore both the positive (e.g., “self exploration and identity experimentation” in the service of relatedness needs and identity formation) and the negative (e.g.,”indulg[ing] in a narcissistic activity”) sides of selfies in this video for the #BBCtrending program. (runs 1 minute, 29 seconds).

15. Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over

“When a team of scientists in Finland asked people to map out where they felt different emotions on their bodies, they found that the results were surprisingly consistent, even across cultures.” From NPR Health News, December 30, 2013.

16. The Orchid Effect: How Relationships and Genetics Influence Your Health

Research by S. C. Suth and R. F. Krueger, published in “Psychological Science” found evidence for a genotype-environment interaction or “an orchid effect” in which “really bad marriages are capable of turning on (and even amplifying) any genetic predispositions one might have to experiencing poor health. But really good marriages may help “good health” genes thrive more so than they would have otherwise.” From the “Science of Relationships” blog, December 2, 2013.

17. Fearful ‘Memories’ Passed Between Generations Through Genetic Code

Jeremy Dean of PsyBlog summarizes a study by Dias and Ressler (2013) which found evidence that mice who were conditioned to become afraid of a particular smell passed that fear onto their offspring. Could this transgenerational genetic response happen in humans? That’s the big question. Published December 5, 2013.

18. Missing “Brake in the Brain” Can Trigger Anxiety

According to research published in the journal “Cerebral Cortex” and summarized here “social phobias and fear can be triggered in the brain [by] a missing inhibitory connection or missing “brake” in the brain.” “Science Daily”, December 4, 2013.

19. Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice

Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: “I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Freud.” (runs 2 minutes)


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 12, August, 2013

August 27, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,837 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Special thanks go out this month to Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast. In illustrating a new tool called “Storify” (see Storify.com) for the Psych News discussion list for teachers of high school psychology, he pointed out three real-world examples of how forced ranking systems for employee assessment may backfire. We have added them to “Personality Pedagogy” under Assessment.

In addition, to herald the end of summer and the beginning of a new year and a new semester, we present three new links for teaching and leaning: Teaching Chance, Teaching Ethics, and The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University and we revisit the Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning. These later two resources contain everything you need to know about teaching and learning from designing syllabi, to ideas for what to do the first day of class to how to assess students’ learning and your teaching. We hope that you will find something here to inspire you to try something new and make this year a great one!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Other People Matter: Three International Positive Psychology Association Tributes to Chris Peterson

Nansook Park, Barbara Fredrickson, and Martin Seligman each gave moving tributes to the late Christopher Peterson at the Third World Congress of the International Positive Psychology Association. Their talks are summarized here in “Positive Psychology News Daily”, July 26, 2013.

3. 10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier

Grounded in research, these activities including practicing gratitude, controlling counter-factual thinking and others may be used to spark discussion or to introduce topics in stress, resilience, cognition, emotion, and positive psychology.

4. Optimists Better at Regulating Stress

“It’s no surprise that those who tend to see a rose’s blooms before its thorns are also better at handling stress. But science has failed to reliably associate optimism with individuals’ biological stress response — until now” according to “Science Daily”, July 23, 2013, summarizing research by Joelle Jobin and Carsten Wrosch published in “Health Psychology”.

5. Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung on Human Personality in Rare BBC Interview

Maria Popova of “Brain Pickings” introduces this video: “On October 22 of 1959, BBC’s Face to Face — an unusual series of pointed, almost interrogative interviews seeking to “unmask public figures” — aired a segment on Jung […] Eighty-four at the time and still working, he talks to New Statesman editor John Freeman about education, religion, consciousness, human nature, and his temperamental differences with Freud, which sparked his study of personality types”. Includes a transcript of the highlights. (Runs 39 minutes, 28 seconds).

6. 6 Things You Thought Wrong About Introverts

The “Huffington Post,” July 28, 2013, presents this list of 6 common misconceptions about introverts based on stereotypes.

7. Acceptance of What Can’t Be Changed Is Key To Satisfaction In Later Life, Research Shows

“When it comes to life satisfaction in one’s later years, the ability to accept what cannot be changed is equally important to the feeling of being able to exert control over one’s life” according to research published in the “Journal of Happiness Studies” and summaries here in the “Huffington Post”, July 12, 2013.

8. Scientific Literacy in a Psychology Curriculum Module (2013)

“The authors describe 9 scientific literacy activities to teach Introductory Psychology students how to read original research reports, critically and thoroughly evaluate secondary research reports, and analyze the utility of each. A 25-page document describes the activities without answers for instructors, a 34-page booklet provides students with the materials they need, and 148 slides contain material without answers that instructors can use in class. Versions with answers to students’ assignments are available to members after logging into STP’s website.” Find the link under the INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY category.

9. Seeing Narcissists Everywhere

Jean M. Twenge, author of “Generation Me” and “The Narcissism Epidemic” talks about her research and the high rate of narcissism today compared to earlier generations in this interview with the “New York Times”, August 5, 2013.

10. Detachment

Virginia Hughes, writing for “Aeon Magazine” describes the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, in which Romanian orphans living in orphanages were randomly assigned to foster care or to stay in the orphanage. Preliminary results suggest that children raised in foster care showed gains in IQ, healthier psychological development, better motor skills, different EEG brainwave patterns when looking at emotional faces, and more white matter than children left in orphanages. This fascinating study, begun in 2000 and continuing today, raises ethical, social, and political questions as it vividly demonstrates the power of social interaction and attachment. Published July 29, 2013.

11. Who Feels Treated Unfairly After Taking An Assessment?

Researchers Laura Honkaniemi, Taru Feldt, Riitta-Leena Metsäpelto, and Asko Tolvanen identified three personality types who differ in their Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness. They found that people hold different perceptions of the fairness of personality testing depending on their personality type: Overcontrolled, Undercontrolled, Resilient, or Bohemian according this summary published in the “British Psychological Society Research Digest”, August 1, 2013.

12. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Worksheets

Free downloadable cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) worksheets, formulations, and self-help resources including blank formulations, thought records, cognitive restructuring worksheets, diaries/data gathering sheets, mechanisms, information sheets, techniques/procedures, useful tools, forgiveness tools, and formulations for specific disorders, all in PDF format.

13. Stacked (Forced) Ranking

From Michael Britt at “The Psych Files”: “Here’s a sound byte from an episode of TWIT (This Week in Technology: http://twit.tv/twit) podcast in which Leo Laporte and John Dvorak discuss the negative effects of a performance appraisal system often called Stacked or Forced ranking. Psychologists refer to scales like this as ordinal scales”. From July 15, 2012, show #362. (This audio clip runs 1 minute, 55 seconds).

14. Forced Ranking: The Poisonous Employee-Ranking System That Helps Explain Microsoft’s Decline

Writing for “Slate Magazine”, Will Oremus, on August 23, 2013 claims that “Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer oversaw a system called “stack ranking,” in which employees on the same team competed directly with one another for money and promotions. Critics say this rewarded brown-nosing and sabotage”.

15. Microsoft’s Lost Decade Due to Forced Ranking Appraisal Systems

Kurt Eichenwald argues that a forced ranking system may have had negative effects on Microsoft’s corporate culture. From “Vanity Fair”, August 2012.

16. Chance

J. Laurie Snell of Dartmouth College presents this page of resources for teaching a course in probability and statistics including videos, audios, syllabi, activities, computer simulations, data sets, links to internet resources, and a Teacher’s Guide for teaching a quantitative literacy course.

17. The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation

The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University presents this extensive online resource which features resources to help new and established faculty design and teach a course, incorporate technology, assess teaching and learning, apply principles of teaching and learning, and more.

18. Teaching Ethics to Undergraduate Psychology Students (TEUPS)

TEUPS is a centralized location for faculty looking for ideas for activities, articles, books, associations, videos, films, lectures, and other resources that are related or could be useful in incorporating ethics into the undergraduate psychology curriculum. This website will be an invaluable resource for those interested in following APA recommendations regarding the teaching of ethics as presented in the Principles for Quality Undergraduate Education in Psychology (2011) and the Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major (2007).

19. Favorite Link Revisited: U.C. Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning

U.C. Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning presents this compendium of classroom-tested strategies and suggestions designed to improve the teaching practices of all college instructors, including beginning, mid-career, and senior faculty members. The page features links to teaching tools that cover both traditional practical tasks–writing a course syllabus, delivering an effective lecture–as well as newer concerns such as technology and online learning.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 11, July, 2013

July 24, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-third Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,821 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you know that narcissists really are as sexy as they think, extroverts are happier and healthier later in life than introverts, and that gloomy thinking can be contagious? Well, it’s a good thing we also have a link to the inspirational Helen Keller and her thoughts on optimism this month. And as a special bonus to subscribers, you can check out this link to hear Keller explain — in her own words and voice —  her greatest regret.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Britain Could Create First ‘Three-parent Baby’ Through IVF

“Parents at high risk of having children with severe disabilities such as muscular dystrophy will be offered the controversial new IVF treatment after it was given the green light by ministers” in the UK today according to this article and video in “The Telegraph”, June 28, 2013. Video runs 2 minutes, 6 seconds.

3. Eight Misconceptions About “Three-Parent Babies”

What to know as the UK works to reverse ban on modifying future children’s genes. From “Psychology Today”, July 10, 2013.

4. We Can’t Undo What Our Parents Have Given Us

Royal Society fellow and epigenetics researcher Edith Heard clarifies the facts and downplays the hype behind recent developments in genetics and epigenetics in this article from “The Guardian”, June 22, 2013.

5. Are Narcissists As Sexy As They Think?

Narcissists think they are sexy. But, then again, they would say that. New research by Dufner et al. (2013) published in “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here in “PsyBlog” suggests that the self-enhancing thoughts and beliefs of narcissists actually make them more attractive to others.

6. Narcissists’ Lack of Empathy Detected in Brain Scans

“Researchers used magnetic resonance imaging to scan the brains of 34 people, including 17 individuals who suffer from narcissistic personality disorder, and found that pathological narcissists have less gray matter in a part of the cerebral cortex called the left anterior insula” according to research published in “The Journal of Psychiatric Research” and summarized here in “Live Science”, June 24, 2013.

7. Extroverts are Happier and Healthier Later in Life

“People who were more outgoing and social during their younger years reported being significantly happier and more satisfied later in life”, according to research by Catharine Gale and colleagues published in the “Journal of Research in Personality” and summarized here in “Discover Magazine” online, July 8, 2013.

8. What Makes Us Extroverts and Introverts?

Drawing on the theories of Carl Jung, Hans Eysenck, and current research in neuroscience, BBC staff writer Tom Stafford explains how the way the brain processes rewards may make people more extroverted or introverted. From July 17, 2013.

9. Gloomy Thinking Can Be Contagious

A particular style of thinking — interpreting the causes of negative events as internal and stable or external and unstable — may actually infect roommates making them more or less vulnerable to depression six months later. This, according to research published by Gerald Haeffel and Jennifer Hames in the journal “Clinical Psychological Science” and described in this report from NPR’s “Morning Edition”, June 24, 2013. Runs 4 minutes, 25 seconds.

10. Helen Keller on Optimism

Maria Popova for “Brain Pickings” shares her musings on Helen Keller’s moving treatise on optimism from 1903. Posted June 6, 2013.

11. Correlation vs. Causation

Everyday Einstein, Lee Falin, “uncovers the truth (and lies) of the correlation/causation fallacy. Just because something seems to cause something else, does not necessarily mean it does.” June 21, 2013.

12. Genes and Memes: Just for Hits – Richard Dawkins

Evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins describes the process of evolution focusing on successful and unsuccessful genes and memes in this entertaining and unusual introduction to the Saatchi & Saatchi New Directors’ Showcase 2013 in Cannes (runs 8 minutes and 47 seconds).

13. How to Increase Willpower: Extended Interview with Roy Baumeister

Eric Barker, of the Barking Up the Wrong Tree blog presents this interview with Roy Baumeister, author of “Willpower: Rediscovering The Greatest Human Strength”, June 25, 2013.

14. What Can Self-Control Do For You?

Can self-control make you happy, willing to sacrifice for others, fairer, unethical or easy to hypnotize? Read on to find out about all 10 new studies which provide surprising answers to these and other questions about what self-control can do for you.

15. Resilience in the Wake of Superstorm Sandy

Social factors such as neighborhood bonds and social supports are important factors in helping people cope with the devastation of Hurricane Sandy according to a recent study summarized here in “Science Daily”, June 24, 2013.

16. A Flashcard Strategy to Help Students Prepare for Three Types of Multiple-Choice Questions Commonly Found on Introductory Psychology Tests

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology presents this resource (click to expand the “Introductory Psychology” category) by Drew Appleby to provide students with a research-based study strategy designed to help them understand, prepare for, and take multiple-choice tests more successfully. The 32 slides that accompany the introductory article familiarize students with three types of cognitive processes their instructors will commonly ask them to use in their classes and then invite them to model the behavior of their instructors by creating flashcards.  Their flashcards should contain verbatim definitions for retention questions, accurate paraphrases for comprehension questions, and realistic examples for application questions.

17. Favorite Link Revisited: Psychmovies.com

Brooke J. Cannon, Marywood University, created and maintains this extensive site which lists movies illustrative psychological principles organized by topic, genre, and popularity ratings. Check out her suggestions for mood disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 9, May, 2013

May 12, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-first Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,781 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month’s newsletter is dedicated to my Personality class. It seems that we fell into an interesting habit last semester (I usually have the same students for this two-semester sequence of Social and Personality psychology). At the request of one of the members, before every exam we went around the room and each person said something encouraging out loud to the next person about how they were going to do well on the exam. They said things like, “I don’t know your name, but you’ve never missed a class, you’re going to do great” or “I hear the scritch-scratch of your pencil behind me so I know you’re taking good notes”. It seemed to calm everybody down. Well, research published this month suggests that self-affirmations can increase problem-solving abilities! So, my class was onto something even before the research evidence was in.

Also, this month, we feature a veritable grab-bag of topics, most of them on the newest research findings in personality psychology: everything from personality changes and weight gain, to the 10 most narcissistic US presidents, to making the world a kinder place. There’s a little something for everyone here, including links to the effect named for the man who made a living on that philosophy: P.T. Barnum.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Self-Affirmation Improves Problem-Solving Under Stress

Research suggests that the identifying and thinking about one’s most important values can increase individuals’ problem-solving abilities. This, according to research by J. David Creswell and colleagues published in “PLOS ONE” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, May 3, 2013.

3. The Biology of Kindness: How it Makes Us Happier and Healthier

Summarizes research by Barbara Fredrickson and colleagues which finds that people who engage in Loving Kindness meditation show great responsiveness of the vagus nerve which plays a role in regulating glucose levels, immune responses, altruistic behavior, and how we connect and bond to one another. From “Time”, May 9, 2013.

4. Bonding with Avatar May Alter Perception of Virtual Reality

“When individuals create their own avatar and modify it, the difficult situations faced by their alter egos may influence the perception of the virtual environment” according to research by Shyam Sundar and colleagues summarized here for PsychCentral, May 6, 2013.

5. Six Ways to Separate Lies From Statistics

Public Policy professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers present these ways in which non-experts can separate useful statistics from the lies in this article for “Bloomberg”, May 2, 1013.

6. You’ll Never Learn: A New Marshmallow Test?

Is resisting a “blinking inbox or a buzzing phone” the new marshmallow test of self-discipline? Read about new evidence on self-discipline and multitasking in this article from “Slate”, May 3, 2013.

7. Weight Gain Linked With Impulsively-Related Personality Trait Changes

“People who gain weight are more likely to give in to temptations but also are more thoughtful about their actions, according to a new study” published by Angelina Sutin and colleagues in “Psychological Science” and summarized here, May 6, 2013.

8. The 10 Most Narcissistic U.S. Presidents

“Scott Lilienfeld and his student Ashley Watts recently found evidence that a personality trait called “grandiose narcissism” predicts greatness in U.S. presidents—and also malignancy” in a new study published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here, May 8, 2013.

9. Nice Guys Finish Last. Really? What Does The Research Say?

Eric Barker of the “Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog weighs the evidence to see if there is any truth to this old adage. When it comes to money, dating and marriage, leadership and life in general, it all depends on what aspect of life you are looking at. Published May 10, 2013.

10. The Times and Troubles of the Scientific Method

“Science is working tirelessly night and day to disprove its own theories about how the universe works (or at least, that’s what science thinks it’s doing). Hank tells us a quick history of how we came to create and adopt the scientific method and then gives us a vision of the future of science (hint: it involves a lot more computers and a lot less pipetting)”. Posted by SciShow, April 29, 2013. (runs 11 minutes, 8 seconds)

11. National African American Photographic Archive

Collects, scans, and makes available to the public “photographs and informative metadata illustrating the daily and work lives and social activities of African Americans.”

12. Dan Ariely: What Makes Us Feel Good About Our Work?

“What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn’t just money. But it’s not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioral economist Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our work”. This TEDx talk was Posted April 10, 2013 and runs 20 minutes, 27 seconds.

13. Do You Fear Missing Out?

Obsessive checking of Twitter and Facebook to see what your friends are doing may have led to a new type of fear: FoMO. The fear of missing out is the “concern that others may be having more fun and rewarding experiences than” we are. Read all about it in this summary from “Science Daily”, April 29, 2013.

14. The Fear of Missing Out

Are you of those people who need to check social media constantly to see what their friends are up to? Take this brief test to see how you compare to others in this new fear that others “may be having more fun and rewarding experiences than we are”.

15. Emotional Intelligence Trumps IQ in Dentist-Patient Relationship

IQ may predict who does well in dental school, but EQ predicts who will make the best patient-friendly dentists. This according to research by Kristin Victoroff and colleagues published in the “Journal of Dental Education” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, April 22, 2013.

16. Risk Factor for Depression Can Be Contagious

A particular style of thinking which makes people vulnerable to depression — interpreting the causes of negative events as internal and stable — may actually infect roommates making them more vulnerable to depression six months later. This, according to research published by Gerald Haeffel and Jennifer Hames in the journal “Clinical Psychological Science” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, April 18, 2013.

17. People Present Themselves in Ways That Counteract Prejudices Toward Their Group

“Individuals from stigmatized groups choose to present themselves in ways that counteract the specific stereotypes and prejudices associated with their group”. This, according to a study by Rebecca Neel and her colleagues published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here in “Science Daily”, April 17, 2013.

18. Extroverts and Introverts, Make Way for the Ambiverts

When it comes to who is likely to excel in sales—Extroverts or Introverts—the surprising answer is both! Research suggests that people who have a balance between Introverted and Extroverted tendencies may have the best of both types of people and end up surpassing both at pulling in more revenue. From “Psychology Today”, April 21, 2013.

19. 7 Myths About Happiness

According to happiness researcher Sonja Lyubomirsky, “Nearly all of us buy into what I call the myths of happiness—beliefs that certain adult achievements (marriage, kids, jobs, wealth) will make us forever happy and that certain adult failures or adversities (health problems, divorce, having little money) will make us forever unhappy. Overwhelming research evidence, however, reveals that there is no magic formula for happiness and no sure course toward misery. Rather than bringing lasting happiness or misery in themselves, major life moments and crisis points can be opportunities for renewal, growth, or meaningful change. Yet how you greet these moments really matters.” From “Psychology Today”, March 9, 2013.

20. Favorite Link Revisited: The Barnum Effect

The Barnum Effect Take this test to remind yourself why good personality tests should provide specific feedback…and why horoscopes are so much fun! This online test of 47 questions plus some background demographics gives the appearance of a legitimate personality test. Respondents receive the typical Barnum feedback and rate how accurate it is. The beauty of this on-line version is that students can change some of their answers and see that their description never changes. In the words of Prof. Birnbaum at Fullerton State who developed this page, “Self-validation is no validation”, according to the explanation given here.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 6, February, 2013

February 27, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,740 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Have you ever wondered what is all the fuss about the “Twilight” series? This month we are pleased to bring you a chapter from Donna Ashcraft’s new book “Deconstructing Twilight”. In it, she takes psychological and feminist approaches to understanding the characters. She and her publisher have graciously agreed to let “Personality Pedagogy” publish Chapter 7 from her book. Here, she analyzes Bella and her relationships with her parents and with Edward to illustrate aspects of Karen Horney’s theory. Ashcroft’s analysis is sure to spark discussion among your fan-students and to get you to think about young adult literature — and personality theories — in a new way.

This month, in honor of using fictional characters as case studies to illustrate personality theories, we revisit one of our favorite links. The NPR program “In Character” presents an in-depth look at more fictional characters suitable for analysis in your personality class.

Finally, I just couldn’t resist throwing in the “World’s Shortest Personality Test” (see link below). My students enjoyed taking it and critiquing it afterwards. We were able to draw on their “results” to see if it matched up to their personality according to a valid measure of the Five Factors. They could readily understand convergent validity and the need for criterion validity through this little demonstration. Try it!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Deconstructing Twilight

Drawing on classic theorists including Carl Jung, Karen Horney, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers and others, Donna Ashcraft takes a psychological and feminist approach to understanding the “Twilight” characters in her book “Deconstructing Twilight: Psychological and Feminist Perspectives on the Series”. Thanks to her publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., you can read and download a PDF of Chapter 7 in which she uses Karen Horney’s 10 neurotic needs to understand the dynamics between Bella and her parents, Bella and Edward, and more. The second link takes you to the Amazon.com page for her book.

3. World’s Quickest Personality Test

Are you imaginative, analytical, or suspicious? Richard Wiseman describes how to assess your personality via this quick measure. A fun way to introduce personality testing and the importance of validity to your students. (runs 1 minute, 26 seconds).

4. Men Are From Earth, Women Are From Earth

“From empathy and sexuality to science inclination and extroversion, statistical analysis of 122 different characteristics involving 13,301 individuals shows that men and women, by and large, do not fall into different groups” according to research by Bobbi Carothers and Harry Reis (2013) published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”. Includes a graphic comparing distributions of men and women on physical strength and masculinity-assertiveness; and a video of Harry Reis explaining their work and what it means (runs 3 minutes, 24 seconds).

5. Willpower Expert Roy Baumeister on Staying in Control

Roy Baumeister explains what willpower is, what depletes our willpower, and how we can manage our willpower to achieve our goals in this interview from “Time”, January 14, 2013.

6. Mistakes Improve Children’s Learning While Building Competence and Autonomy

We need not always protect children from mistakes; mistakes can be part of the learning and discovery process and actually increase learning. Children build competence through mastering challenges, and autonomy though trying new approaches.

7. How to Become Highly Skilled in CBT

“In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Drs. Aaron and Judith Beck discuss the process of improving as a therapist. Like most skills, excellent therapy skills are achieved over time with good training and experience. Dr. Aaron Beck emphasizes the importance of utilizing patient feedback, as well as learning from colleagues and supervisors. Dr. Judith Beck discusses the importance of keeping an open mind in one’s progression as a therapist, including incorporating new techniques from other fields of therapy within the CBT framework.” Published by the Beck Institute, January 16, 2013.

8. Design Your Own Implicit Association Tests (IAT)

Adam Meade, North Carolina State University, has created this website where researchers can create their own IATs using free open-source software on this website.

9. Research Methods and Statistics Concept Maps

Alexis Grosofsky, Beloit College, created these concept maps of topics typically covered in undergraduate methods and statistics courses. These maps will help students organize material and see the “bigger picture” of how these concepts relate to each other. Each of these 11 maps could be used as an introduction, summary, or quick refresher (opens in PDF format).

10. Teaching Statistics: Not Awful and Boring

Jessica Hartnett, Gannon University, started this blog where she shares online resources for teaching statistic to undergraduates. In her own words: “Most of [the suggestions] are funny. A few of them are serious but engaging. At no point will I suggest that you count M&M colors (although there is nothing wrong with that). Also, I’m not making any money off of this, I just know how hard it can be to teach statistics/research methods and thought I would share what I have.”

11. fMRI: Real-Time Self-Regulation of Emotion Networks

Using fMRI, 8 patients with depression were able to increase activity in areas of the brain related to positive emotion and lowered their depression through neuro(bio)feedback. A control group who went through similar cognitive strategies but without the feedback did not show such improvement. Includes downloadable slides of their findings.

12. Mindfulness neuroscience

Neuropsychologist Deric Bownds summarizes findings from a special issue of the journal “Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience” devoted to meditation and the brain. He describes four possible mechanisms by which meditation works and discusses the problem of control groups and random assignment in meditation research.

13. Do You Know What Determines Your Happiness?

Eric Karpinski, muses on the impact of genetics, external circumstances, and our own actions and thoughts on our happiness. Posted August 11, 2011.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: In Character: Tricksters, Vamps, Heroes, Scamps

“From Darth Vader to Scarlett O’Hara, the best fictional characters reflect something about who we are and how we got here.” In Character, “a [2008] six-month series from NPR, explores indelible American characters from fiction, folklore and pop culture.” Hear experts discuss the psychology of characters such as Vernon Waters (“A Soldier’s Story”), Willie Stark (“All the King’s Men”), Charlotte (“Charlotte’s Web”), Auntie Mame, Uncle Tom, Henry Fleming (“The Red Badge of Courage”), The Joker, Norman Bates, Nancy Drew, Jo March (“Little Woman”), King Kong, Mr. Spock, Carrie (“Sex and the City”), Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Ricky Ricardo, Charlie Brown, Fred Sanford, Indiana Jones, Dora the Explorer, Mama Rose, Hanibal Lecter, Portnoy, Eric Cartman (“South Park”), Walter Mitty, Catwoman, Blanche DuBois, Captain Ahab, Barbie, Harriet the Spy, Hester Prynne (“The Scarlet Letter”), Elmer Gantry, Darth Vader, Gordon Gekko (“Wall Street”), Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp, Cookie Monster, George Jefferson, Willy Loman (“Death of a Salesman”), Huckleberry Finn, Scarlett O’Hara, Pollyanna, Holden Caulfield, The Lone Ranger, Lassie, Bugs Bunny, and others.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 5, January, 2013

January 26, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,725 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy New Year! Happy New Month! And for many of you, Happy New Semester! As much as I hate the darkness of winter here on the East Coast, I do relish the chance to start again with new beginnings. If you are like me, then you will welcome this month’s newsletter filled with new things to refresh and renew your personality psychology classes.

Speaking of happy, we’ve got a bit of a debate of sorts happening in this issue. Check out three of our newest links suggesting that money does buy happiness —  but that there’s more to life than being happy, and judge for yourself.

This month marks 20 years since the first fMRI study was published. To celebrate, the APS journal Perspectives on Psychological Science features a special section in which leading scientists reflect on the contributions this brain scanning technique has made to our understanding of human thought. While not strictly related to personality, the reflections are nonetheless interesting. Check it out here.

Special thanks goes out to Jon Mueller for the link to the Easy Bake Oven controversy (see below). Be sure to check out his newsletter and website if you are interested in teaching social psychology.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Maslow’s Theory of Self-Actualization, More or Less Actualized

Psychologist Ann Reitan reflects on Abraham Maslow’s notion of self-actualization. First, she explains what it is, then she muses on what it means for different people at different times in their lives, drawing on the work of Eric Erikson. Finally, she suggests that self-actualizing people may find meaning at lower levels of the hierarchy, such as when their needs are being threatened. She gives examples of people who she believed were actualizing while facing death (e.g., Viktor Frankl), fearing for their safety (e.g., Nelson Mandela), losing their freedom (e.g., Ghandi), and experiencing mental illness (e.g., Sylvia Plath). From “Brain Blogger”, January 8, 2013.

3. There’s More to Life Than Being Happy

According to Viktor Frankl, “It is the very pursuit of happiness that thwarts happiness,” and yet Americans and American psychology are obsessed with happiness. Meaningfulness and happiness are not the same thing, and this article draws on new work by Roy Baumeister, Kathleen Vohs, Jennifer Aaker & Emily Garbinsky (2013) to understand the difference. From “The Atlantic”, January 9, 2013. Their forthcoming paper in the “Journal of Positive Psychology” is available here: http://tinyurl.com/b8mbayk (opens in PDF format).

4. Yes, Money Does Buy Happiness: 6 Lessons from the Newest Research on Income and Well-Being

A summary of 6 observations from the paper “The New Stylized Facts about Income and Subjective Well-Being” by Daniel W. Sacks, Betsey Stevenson, and Justin Wolfers. From “The Atlantic,” January 10, 2013.

5. Implicit Assessment of The Five Factors

Researches have hit upon an implicit way of measuring personality, the “semantic misattribution procedure”. “In this initial study, and two more involving nearly 300 participants … participants’ scores on this test for conscientiousness, neuroticism and extraversion correlated with explicit measures of the same traits. The new implicit test also did a better job than explicit measures alone of predicting relevant behaviours, such as church attendance, perseverance on a lab task, and punctuality. The implicit scores for extraversion showed good consistency over 6 months. Finally, the new implicit test showed fewer signs of being influenced by social desirability concerns, as compared with traditional explicit measures.” From “BPS Research Digest”, December 13, 2012.

6. Assessing Personality via Social Media Postings: TruthSerum.com

TruthSerum.com claims to assess personality though people’s social media posts. Users can analyze their own personality and see how they compare to Barak Obama, Mitt Romney, Abraham Lincoln, the Unabomber Ted Kaczynski and some 135 other famous people on Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Machiavellianism, Narcissism, and Psychopathy (aka, Psychoticism).

7. You Can’t See It, But You’ll be a Different Person in 10 Years

“No matter how old people are, they seem to believe that who they are today is essentially who they’ll be tomorrow.” according to the End of History Illusion. According to researcher Daniel Gilbert, “Life is a process of growing and changing, and what our results suggest is that growth and change really never stops … despite the fact that at every age from 18 to 68, we think it’s pretty much come to a close.” You can listen to the original segment and comment by Gilbert here, on the NPR website (runs 3 minutes, 58 seconds) or read a more in-depth summary from the “New York Times” here.

8. Sexism-Free Easy Bake Oven On the Way

Due to the protests started by 13-year old McKenna Pope (here) and backed by big-name chefs including Bobby Flay, and the general public, Hasbro, the makers of the class Easy-Bake, oven will launch a new line of gender-neutral ovens that will feature gender-neutral colors and more boys in their advertisements.

9. Activities Guide: Teaching Ethics in the Introduction to Psychology Course

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to announce this new resource for teachers by Ana Ruiz and Judith Warchal of Alvernia University. “This 23-page guide presents 17 activities related to ethics for each chapter in a typical Introduction to Psychology text as it integrates the APA Learning Goals and Outcomes for ethics into that course.  For each chapter, the activity lists the student learning outcome, instructions for conducting the activity, materials needed, approximate time required, and a method of assessment.” Activities most relevant to the personality class include APA ethics code jeopardy, research methods, personality testing, and debating controversial topics.

10. Who’s Gay On TV? Dads, Journalists, Investigators, And Footmen

Presents an interesting account of the various portrayals of gays and lesbians found on TV today. Though the number of gays and lesbians has increased in recent years, for some, the portrayals may not be as realistic as they could be. Published January 3, 2013. (also available in audio running 7 minutes, 45 seconds).

11. Gorillas, Watermelons and Sperm: The Greatest Genomes Sequenced in 2012

Scientists identified the genetic codes of some of the world’s most fascinating animals and plants. Check out what they found in this online photo gallery of 8 stunning images posted by “Popular Science”, January 2, 2013.

12. The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational

A good summary of 12 common flaws in our thinking including the confirmation bias, gambler’s fallacy, neglecting probability, the current moment bias, the anchoring effect, and more.

13. A Chart of Emotions that Have No Names in the English Language

Designer Pei-Ying Lin has created interesting conceptual charts of emotions including one for emotions that have no names in the English language and another for new emotions invented by the Internet.

14. Neurotic People Might Have Better Health Outcomes When They are High in Conscientiousness.

People who are high in Neuroticism and Conscientiousness experience lower levels of Interleukin 6 (IL-6), a biomarker for inflammation and chronic disease; lower body-mass index scores; and fewer diagnosed chronic health conditions. From “Prevention News”, November 2012.

15. Darwin Was Wrong About Dating

New research is beginning to question the long-accepted evolutionary explanation for various mating behaviors. Read about some of the alternative explanations and new data on sex differences in mating strategies, selectiveness, and desire for casual sex. From “The New York Times,” January 12, 2013.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: Careers in Psychology

From the website: “Are you preparing yourself for a career in psychology? Well, you’ve come to the right place! We understand your enthusiasm and eagerness to get started in a growing and lucrative field like psychology. However, we also know how difficult it can be to get started in this field, which is exactly why we’re here.” The site features background information on careers, degree paths, programs, internships, licensure information, interviews with psychology professionals, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 2, October, 2012

October 29, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,598 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are greatly saddened to learn of the untimely death of Christopher Peterson. Peterson, among the 100 most cited psychologists, was an inspiring teacher and creative researcher and advocate in the field of positive psychology, which he once described as the”scientific study of what makes life most worth living.” Read more about his life and work here and check out our first and last links below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than “Personality Pedagogy”.

2.The Good Life

In tribute to Christopher Peterson, a founding father of the positive psychology movement, “Psychology Today” put together this special online issue highlighting the life and legacy of Christopher Peterson, research pioneer, colleague, and teacher.

3. Careers in Psychology

A resource for students who are interested in pursuing a career in the field of psychology. The site has career and licensure info, jobs, internships, and commentary by experts — some of the top psychologists in the world — and more.

4. The Marshmallow Study Revisited

This classic measurement of children’s self-control was replicated and updated in a study published in Cognition this month and summarized here, October 11, 2012. Children who experienced reliable interactions immediately before the marshmallow task waited on average four times longer — 12 versus three minutes — than youngsters in similar but unreliable situations. Includes photos and video from the study, and a graph of results.

5. Persuasive Messages Tied to Personality

The “Eclipse Writer Blog” presents a summary of the research by Hirsh et al. (2012) which found that advertising was more effective when it was tailored to the levels of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness of the target audience. Includes some interesting suggestions on how to apply these findings to advertising. See also Hirsh, Jacob, Sonia Kang and Galen Bodenhausen, Personalized Persuasion: Tailoring Persuasive Appeals to Recipients’ Personality Traits, “Psychological Science”, 30 April 2012.

6. The Bem Sex Role Inventory

According to the site: “The Bem Sex Role Inventory was developed in 1971 by Dr. Sandra Lipsitz Bem. It characterizes your personality as masculine, feminine, androgynous, or undifferentiated. The BSRI is based on gender stereotypes, so what it’s actually measuring is how well you fit into your traditional sex role. Thus, your score may say as much about how our cultural expectations have changed over the last 35 years as it does about your personality.” You can take the original 60-item scale and receive your scores automatically online here.

7. Teampedia: Tools for Teams

Teampedia is a “collaborative encyclopedia of free team building activities, free icebreakers, teamwork resources, and tools for teams that anyone can edit!
This site is designed for a wide audience including: team leaders, trainers, teachers, managers, camp directors, counselors, and youth groups.”

8. Understanding That You’ll Never Be Perfect

Writer Therese J. Borchard muses on what it’s like to live with perfectionism and finally learn to let it go.

9. Pupil Dilation Reveals Sexual Orientation

“Pupils were highly telling: they widened most to videos of people who participants found attractive, thereby revealing where they were on the sexual spectrum from heterosexual to homosexual”, according to research published in PLoS ONE and summarized here, in “Science Daily,” August 6, 2012.

10. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy Video Toolkit

This toolkit consists of seven videos, up to 16 minutes each, with accompanying worksheets and information, on “Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy” (MBCT) by Jay Uhdinger.

11. Is it Better to be an Introvert or an Extrovert?

Blogger Erik Barker summarizes research on the strengths and weaknesses of introverts and extroverts.

12. Was Freud Wrong? Are Dreams the Brain’s Start-Up Test?

“Measurements taken from sleeping people explain, at least in part, why dreams tend to have such bizarre but vivid story lines. The findings deal a blow to the Freudian interpretation of dreams but leave open the possibility that some useful personal meaning can be extracted from them. The main purpose of dreams, however, the authors of the new study believe, is to test whether the brain has had enough sleep and, if so, to wake it up”, according to this article by Nicholas Wade in “The New York Times”.

13. Happiness Equals Love

George Vaillant explores and explains the data behind his finding that “The only thing that really matters inline are your relationships to other people”. From “Positive Psychology Daily News”, July 16, 2009.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: Positive Psychology Center

The Positive Psychology Center has extensive resources including summary of current research, sample syllabi, high school curriculum, online research participation, and extensive bibliography.