Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 10, Number 1, September 2015

September 30, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,221 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you know that September 18 was “Jeans for Genes Day”, a campaign by this British charity to raise awareness of genetic disorders? As part of their educational campaign, they started a web page loaded with information and resources for teachers about genetics and genetic disorders. To celebrate with them, check out the links below and our Favorite Link Revisited.

Presidential hopefuls are often subject to name calling in the press, but have you heard about Donald Trump as “Narrcissist-in-Chief”? A touch of narcissism may actually be a helpful trait for the U.S. President…or at least a presidential hopeful according to research reviewed in the New York Times (see link below).

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Raising Awareness of Genetic Disorders: Jeans for Genes Day

As part of their mission, Jeans for Genes Day, which raises awareness of genetic disorders and money for people with genetic disorders, created “five minute films that are narrated by children who are either affected by a genetic disorder themselves or have an affected sibling. Each film is accompanied by a teacher fact sheet and a number of resources that can be used in the classroom.”

3. Six creative ways to teach genetics

A selection of creative ways to help students of all ages and abilities understand genes and genetic disorders. From “The Guardian”, September 7, 2015.

4. Your Family Health History: A DNA Day Activity

This PDF describes how to create a family tree or pedigree documenting medical conditions which may run in families, but you can easily adapt the activity to focus on personality traits.

5. Science says these 2 personality traits predict whether you’ll be a successful leader

“Every organization, from Apple and Google to the US government, demands different skills and personal qualities in its leadership. But research suggests there are two traits that are common to the majority of successful leaders: extroversion and conscientiousness”. According to a meta-analysis by Timothy Judge and colleagues as summarized here for “Business Insider”, July 14, 2015.

6. What does your selfie reveal about your personality?

According to research by Lin Qiu and colleagues published in “Computers in Human Behaviour” “[P]eople who scored higher in agreeableness (similar to friendliness) were more likely to show positive emotion in their selfies and to hold the camera in a lower position; high-scorers on conscientiousness were less likely to reveal a private location in the background (presumably because of concerns about privacy); people who scored higher in neuroticism (suggestive of emotional instability) were more likely to pull a duck face; and finally, higher scores in openness-to-experience correlated with showing more positive emotion. Levels of extraversion were not correlated with any of the cues, perhaps because so many people attempt to appear outgoing in their selfies.” From “BPS Research Digest”, August 11, 2015.

7. This personality test can signal if you have selfish or manipulative tendencies

“Do you deceive other people for your own benefit, see others as weak and untrustworthy, and ignore moral codes? If so, you may be” a high Mach according to this summary presented in “Business Insider”, August 27, 2015.

8. Machiavellianism Scale

This is an interactive version of the MACH-IV test of Machiavellianism.

9. The Narcissist in Chief

Writing for the “New York Times”, Gerard DuBois summarizes research on the kind of leaders narcissists make with an eye toward evaluating presidential candidates.

10. Research Tool Demonstrates How Your Facebook Likes Reveal Your Personality

Eric Ravenscraft, writing for “LifeHacker”, discusses a tool developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge to analyze your Facebook like to reveal what people can learn about you. This link takes you directly to the tool should you wish to try it out for yourself.

11. How Changeable Is Gender?

Richard A. Friendman, professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College writes about how research in neuroscience suggests that gender identity and how it exists on a continuum in this thought-provoking essay. From “The New York Times”, August 22, 2015.

12. Here’s a Quick Way to Figure Out What You Should Do With Your Life, Based on Your Personality

Check out this colorful flow chart, based on the work of John Holland, which asks a series of questions to help you find your ideal career. From “The Muse”, July 13, 2015.

13. 6 Sample Questions Employers Ask to Assess your Personality

These 6 questions may be questions you are likely to see the next time you apply for a job. From “Business Insider”, July 16, 2015.

14. The Good Habit Which Boosts Self-Control

Research by Pilcher et al. (2015) and published in “Frontiers in Human Neuroscience” finds that good sleep habits like going to bed at the same time every night, can boost attention, improve decision-making, and strengthen the ability to resist impulses. From PsyBlog, July 10, 2015.

15. This Obvious Happiness Strategy Really Does Work, Study Finds

According to research by Catalino et al. from the journal “Emotion”, explicitly trying to feel happier as well as paying too much attention to how happy you feel have both been linked to feeling worse. The secret to happiness appears to be “prioritizing positivity”. From PsyBlog, July 3, 2015.

16. The Personality Trait Linked To The Strongest Immune System

Outgoing, sociable people also have the strongest immune systems according to a study by Vedhara et al. (2014) published in the journal “Psychoneuroendochrinology” and summarized here in PsyBlog, December 14, 2014.

17. The Psychological Secret to Great Exercise Habits

Here’s the secret: “It’s all about making sure there are regular cues which prompt you to automatically exercise”. The catch? These cues are likely to be different for different people. From PsyBlog, July 15, 2015.

18. Take the Narcissism Test and Find Out If You’re ’Normal’

Ames et al. (2006) created a short 16-item test for narcissism which was published in the “Journal of Research in Personality”. You can take an online version of their test here.

19. Is Life’s Happiness Curve Really U-Shaped

Evidence suggests that happiness is likely to increase as we age according to research summarized here in “The Guardian”, June 24, 2015.

20. Why CBT is Falling Out of Favour

What’s going on? “After analysing 70 studies conducted between 1977 and 2014, researchers Tom Johnsen and Oddgeir Friborg concluded that CBT is roughly half as effective in treating depression as it used to be.” Read about their results and possible explanations for this trend in this summary for “The Guardian”, July 3, 2015.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: Teach Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website as a companion to their Learn.Genetics website. Here you will find classroom activities to teach the basics of heritable traits and take-home activities to help students share what they’ve learned with their families. PDFs are available for download including instructions, student worksheets, overhead masters, and answer keys. Some of the material may be too basic for a college class (although the graphics which review the basics of inheritance would make an excellent review), the topics do include Epigenetics, gene therapy, personalized medicine, cloning, and other fairly sophisticated topics. Most of the activities can be modified to fit the needs of your students and the topic of personality.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 10, June 2015

June 21, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,161 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This big news this month is that Personality Pedagogy has a new look: photos! If you browse any of our pages, you will notice the content is there but the layout is more aesthetically pleasing, incorporating many photos and illustrations. Also, we are now a mobile friendly site, meaning that it is easier than ever to look up content on the fly when you away from your computer. We will continue updating and repairing broken links over the summer and in the process finding new sites to add as you can see by this packed newsletter.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Using OK Cupid to Teach Research Methods

Co-founder Christian Rudder talks about how OK Cupid collects and uses data. Their methods raise important questions about research including: “What are different kinds of social science data? How can/should we manipulate respondents to get it? What does it look like? How can it be used to answer questions? Or, how can we understand the important difference between having the data and doing an interpretation of it?”

3. Positive Reinforcement – The Big Bang Theory

Sheldon uses chocolate to shape Penny’s behavior. Later, Sheldon and Leonard have a discussion of conditioning, which, despite some misuse of terms, may still spark discussion in your class.

4. Nature v Nurture: Research Shows It’s Both

A meta-analysis of almost every twin study conducted from across the world shows that the average variation for human traits and diseases is 49% genetic and 51% due to environmental factors. This, according to research published in the journal Nature Genetics and summarized here. Published May 15, 2015.

5. On The California Shore, Sizing Up Female Marines’ Combat Readiness

The Pentagon has decreed that the Marines must open combat roles for women by 2016 unless they can show a good reason not to. The Marine Corps has teamed up with the University of Pittsburgh to scientifically measure skills, strength, and endurance in order to establish valid and reliable gender-neutral standards.

6. How 4th Grade Predicts Your Future

“A growing body of psychological research is revealing a few remarkable connections between our childhood experiences with peers and our lives in adulthood.” Read about personality coherence of adult personality in kids who were rejected, controversial, neglected, and accepted as fourth graders. From “Psychology Today”, June 2015.

7. James Randi Educational Foundation

“James Randi has an international reputation as a magician and escape artist, but today he is best known as the world’s most tireless investigator and demystifier of paranormal and pseudoscientific claims.” Towards this end, his website features educational modules on “How to Think About Dubious Claims”, “Astrology: Superstition or Science?”, “Do you have ESP?” and more.

8. A Key Researcher Says “Grit” isn’t Ready for High-Stakes Measures

Grit, the “ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal”, has been embraced by educators, the media. But according to researcher Angela Duckworth, “the enthusiasm is getting ahead of the science”. From NPR, May 13, 2015.

9. This Day in Jewish History: A Psychoanalyst Who Couldn’t Understand War is Born

“March 23, 1900 is the birthdate of the Jewish scholar and psychoanalyst Erich Fromm, who gave up the religious obligations of the Orthodox Judaism of his youth for the study of the psychology of love – and war, which, to his mind, made very little rational sense.” From “Haaretz”, March 23, 2015.

10. Allport

A whiteboard video animation on the life of Gordon Allport. Runs 2 minutes and 19 seconds.

11. Gordon Allport Wiki

Includes pages on Allport’s early life, trait theory, and his visit with Freud.

12. Social Psychology Then and Now

Writing for the APS Observer, Anthony G. Greenwald describes the life and work of Gordon Allport including his work related to attitudes, IAT, prejudice, values, and more. From January 2013.

13. A Profile of Aaron Beck

“PsychCentral” presents this brief profile of Aaron Beck.

14. The Doctor is IN

“The American Scholar” presents this overview of the life, work, and theories of Aaron Beck. Posted September 2009.

15. Whether You’re a Lark or a Night Owl, Your Sleeping Habits Say Volumes About Your Health.

A brief summary of the research on morning larks and night owls and how they differ in their disposition, breakfast habits, alarm clock use, vulnerability to jet lag, age, and more. From April 2013.

16. Centre For Personal Construct Psychology

The University of Hertfordshire maintains this site related to personal construct psychology (PCP). Features background information on PCP, George Kelly, the repertory grid, courses and services, literature and library, and more.

17. Kelly (1978): Confusion and the Clock

The last work of George Kelly where he discusses the idea of death. Originally published as Kelly, G.A. (1978) Confusion and the Clock In Fransella, F. (Ed.) Personal Construct Psychology. Academic Press.

18. Kelly (1969): The Threat of Aggression

Kelly, G. A. (1969). The threat of aggression. In B. Maher (Ed.), Clinical Psychology and Personality: The Selected Papers of George Kelly (pp. 281-288). London, UK: Wiley.

19. The Duckworth Lab

The research lab of Angela Duckworth at the University of Pennsylvania: “Our lab focuses on two traits that predict achievement: grit and self-control. Grit is the tendency to sustain interest in and effort toward very long-term goals (Duckworth et al., 2007). Self-control is the voluntary regulation of behavioral, emotional, and attentional impulses in the presence of momentarily gratifying temptations or diversions (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005; Duckworth & Steinberg, 2015).”

20. Favorite Link Revisited: The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook

The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook Mike Masnick discusses an “experiment” conducted by David Plotz of Slate magazine. Plotz noted that well-wishers responded automatically when they saw that a friend was having a birthday on Facebook.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 1, September, 2013

October 1, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,856 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we bring you an unprecedented number of links to invigorate your personality classes, including a 3-part battle between the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and critics who find it lacks validity. In addition, just in time for you to prepare for Halloween next month, we found one of the strangest links yet. Our friend Michael Britt, he of The Psych Files, presents this highly original and unforgettable way of helping students keep the Psychosexual Stages straight. Freud as a zombie! Yes, you heard it here first, folks. As if arm wrestling with Freud wasn’t scary enough… As a chaser, we let Freud speak for himself in his own voice in our Favorite Link Revisited.

This month we want to give a special shout-out to Personality Pedagogy friends Kelvin Seifert and Zsuszanna Szabo at the Teaching Ed Psych Wiki. Sponsored by the Teaching Educational Psychology special interest group of the American Educational Research Association, The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki tries to be especially thorough. They are open to submissions and suggestions so check them out at the link below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki

The Teaching Ed Psych Wiki is a “collection of materials helpful in teaching introductory educational psychology in teacher education programs” including class activities and demonstrations, course assignments, course syllabi, and materials on specific topics within educational psychology.

3. How to Memorize Freud’s Stages of Psychosexual Development

From the site: “Need to memorize Freud’s stages of psychosexual development for a test? Here’s a mnemonic that should do the trick. In this brief video, the founder of psychoanalysis gives you a mnemonic and explains the 5 stages for you. What do orangutans and ogres have to do with Freud’s stages? They’ll help you remember them, that’s what. Find out how in this video episode” of “The Psych Files” podcast, Episode 202, September 7, 2013. (runs 4 minutes, 43 seconds).

4. Say Goodbye to MBTI, The Fad That Won’t Die

Wharton professor and author Adam Grant explains how a good personality test ought to have reliability, validity, and be independent and comprehensive. He describes what these standards are and proceeds to weigh the evidence and concludes that the Myers-Briggs Personality Inventory is not a very good personality test. Posted September, 2013.

5. MBTI, If You Want Me Back, You Need to Change Too

A follow up to the previous article (Say Goodbye to the MBTI), Wharton professor and author Adam Grant explains what needs to happen in order for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to become a better personality test. He writes his critiques in the very entertaining form of a letter to a former love.

6. The Myers-Briggs Assessment is No Fad

In response to Wharton professor and author Adam Grant’s previous essays critiquing the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPP, the company which publishes the MBTI and trains test administrators, published this rejoinder defending their product.

7. Online Psychology Laboratory

According to the website, “OPL provides highly interactive resources for the teaching of psychological science. The peer-reviewed materials include online studies and correlational studies, large data sets, demonstrations, and teaching aids.”

8. The Link Between Personality and Immunity

Research suggests that “basic personality markers — extraversion, hostility, and optimism among them — do seem to play a role in how well someone wards off sickness.” Read about the latest findings here in the Association for Psychological Science “Observer”, September, 2013.

9. Abraham Maslow and the pyramid that beguiled business

The BBC News Magazine takes a look at the question “The psychologist Abraham Maslow’s theory of human motivation is 70 years old but continues to have a strong influence on the world of business. What is it, and is it right?” August 31, 2013.

10. How Evolution Works, Animated in Minimalist Motion Graphics

This simple and engaging cartoon explains the basics of evolution and “why DNA copying errors explain blue eyes”. Runs 11 minutes 48 seconds. Warning: contains a cartoon depiction of sex at 4:13.

11. 23 Signs You’re Secretly a Narcissist Masquerading as a Sensitive Introvert

Past research has suggested that there are two types of Narcissism: “Grandiosity-Exhibitionism” and “Vulnerability-Sensitivity”. While both types share a common core of traits including conceit, arrogance, and “the tendency to give in to one’s own needs and disregard others” they present differently according to research summarized in this article. Includes a 23-item scale measuring Hypersensitive Narcissism.

12. Hypersensitive Narcissism Scale

This 23-item scale was recently presented by Jonathan Cheek, Holly Hendin, and Paul Wink at the 2013 Association for Research in Personality conference.

13. 23 Signs You’re Secretly An Introvert

From the website: “Think you can spot an introvert in a crowd? Think again. Although the stereotypical introvert may be the one at the party who’s hanging out alone by the food table fiddling with an iPhone, the “social butterfly” can just as easily have an introverted personality” according to this illustrated article from “The Huffington Post”, August 29, 2013.

14. 31 Unmistakable Signs That You’re An Introvert

“BuzzFeed” put together this entertaining series of gifs illustrating what it’s like to be an introvert.

15. Psychology Teaching Ideas: A Blog for Teachers of AS and A2 Psychology

Experienced teacher of A Level Psychology in the UK, Caroline Rigby created this blog “for teachers of A Level Psychology. Posts on this blog include ideas to keep teaching topical by using Psychology related news and publications in the classroom and ways to ensure students experience Psychology at A Level in a way that equips them with the thinking and study skills for future study.”

16. Is Baby Male or Female? Germans Offer Third Gender

In Germany, newborn babies with ambiguous genitalia will no longer be rigidly labeled male or female on their birth certificates. Parents may indicate “undetermined” or “unspecified”, wait until later in the child’s life to declare a gender, or even never officially declare a gender. From “ABC News”, August 22, 2013.

17. Attachment Explained: Peppermint Patty, Lucy van Pelt, Schroeder, and Charlie Brown…

Bartholomew and Horowitz’ four categories of attachment are visualized using characters from the classic cartoon “Peanuts”.

18. 7 Persistent Myths about Introverts and Extroverts

PsychCentral presents this list of myths from the one that introverts are shy and don’t make good public speakers to the one that extroverts are shallow and don’t like quiet time.

19. The Dance Between Codependents & Narcissists

This article from “PsychCentral” describes the “codependency dance” between the narcissistic taker/controller and the codependent pleaser/fixer.

20. Why Parenting Can Never Have a Rule Book: Children’s Genetics Significantly Affect How They Are Parented

A meta-analysis published in the October 2013 “Personality and Social Psychology Review” by Reut Avinun and Ariel Knafo describes how individual parenting styles may be a reaction to the child’s genotype in this summary from “Science Daily”, September 3, 2013.

21. Men and Women Are the Same Species!

“Similarities between the sexes can be as important as differences” according to this summary of areas of differences and similarity between the sexes by Agustín Fuentes for “Psychology Today”, May 24, 2012.

22. So, What’s Your Story?

“What are some of the harmful stories you tell about yourself, and how could you rewrite those stories to be more supportive and nurturing of who you really are?” Read about how we can change the stories we tell about ourselves by Melissa Kirk for “Psychology Today”, April 27, 2012.

23. Favorite Link Revisited: Sigmund Freud’s Voice

Toward the end of his life, Freud was asked by the BBC to provide a brief statement about his decades-long career in psychoanalysis. He offered a succinct overview in 1938 which you can hear for yourself in his voice: “I started my professional activity as a neurologist trying to bring relief to my neurotic patients. Under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts, I discovered some important and new facts about the unconscious in psychic life, the role of instinctual urges and so on. Out of these findings grew a new science, Psycho-Analysis, a part of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuroses. I had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck. People did not believe in my facts and thought my theories unsavoury. Resistance was strong and unrelenting. In the end I succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an International Psycho-Analytic Association. But this struggle is not yet over. Sigmund Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 1, September, 2013


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 12, August, 2013

August 27, 2013

Hello and welcome to the eighty-fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,837 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Special thanks go out this month to Michael Britt of “The Psych Files” podcast. In illustrating a new tool called “Storify” (see Storify.com) for the Psych News discussion list for teachers of high school psychology, he pointed out three real-world examples of how forced ranking systems for employee assessment may backfire. We have added them to “Personality Pedagogy” under Assessment.

In addition, to herald the end of summer and the beginning of a new year and a new semester, we present three new links for teaching and leaning: Teaching Chance, Teaching Ethics, and The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University and we revisit the Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning. These later two resources contain everything you need to know about teaching and learning from designing syllabi, to ideas for what to do the first day of class to how to assess students’ learning and your teaching. We hope that you will find something here to inspire you to try something new and make this year a great one!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Other People Matter: Three International Positive Psychology Association Tributes to Chris Peterson

Nansook Park, Barbara Fredrickson, and Martin Seligman each gave moving tributes to the late Christopher Peterson at the Third World Congress of the International Positive Psychology Association. Their talks are summarized here in “Positive Psychology News Daily”, July 26, 2013.

3. 10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier

Grounded in research, these activities including practicing gratitude, controlling counter-factual thinking and others may be used to spark discussion or to introduce topics in stress, resilience, cognition, emotion, and positive psychology.

4. Optimists Better at Regulating Stress

“It’s no surprise that those who tend to see a rose’s blooms before its thorns are also better at handling stress. But science has failed to reliably associate optimism with individuals’ biological stress response — until now” according to “Science Daily”, July 23, 2013, summarizing research by Joelle Jobin and Carsten Wrosch published in “Health Psychology”.

5. Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung on Human Personality in Rare BBC Interview

Maria Popova of “Brain Pickings” introduces this video: “On October 22 of 1959, BBC’s Face to Face — an unusual series of pointed, almost interrogative interviews seeking to “unmask public figures” — aired a segment on Jung […] Eighty-four at the time and still working, he talks to New Statesman editor John Freeman about education, religion, consciousness, human nature, and his temperamental differences with Freud, which sparked his study of personality types”. Includes a transcript of the highlights. (Runs 39 minutes, 28 seconds).

6. 6 Things You Thought Wrong About Introverts

The “Huffington Post,” July 28, 2013, presents this list of 6 common misconceptions about introverts based on stereotypes.

7. Acceptance of What Can’t Be Changed Is Key To Satisfaction In Later Life, Research Shows

“When it comes to life satisfaction in one’s later years, the ability to accept what cannot be changed is equally important to the feeling of being able to exert control over one’s life” according to research published in the “Journal of Happiness Studies” and summaries here in the “Huffington Post”, July 12, 2013.

8. Scientific Literacy in a Psychology Curriculum Module (2013)

“The authors describe 9 scientific literacy activities to teach Introductory Psychology students how to read original research reports, critically and thoroughly evaluate secondary research reports, and analyze the utility of each. A 25-page document describes the activities without answers for instructors, a 34-page booklet provides students with the materials they need, and 148 slides contain material without answers that instructors can use in class. Versions with answers to students’ assignments are available to members after logging into STP’s website.” Find the link under the INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY category.

9. Seeing Narcissists Everywhere

Jean M. Twenge, author of “Generation Me” and “The Narcissism Epidemic” talks about her research and the high rate of narcissism today compared to earlier generations in this interview with the “New York Times”, August 5, 2013.

10. Detachment

Virginia Hughes, writing for “Aeon Magazine” describes the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, in which Romanian orphans living in orphanages were randomly assigned to foster care or to stay in the orphanage. Preliminary results suggest that children raised in foster care showed gains in IQ, healthier psychological development, better motor skills, different EEG brainwave patterns when looking at emotional faces, and more white matter than children left in orphanages. This fascinating study, begun in 2000 and continuing today, raises ethical, social, and political questions as it vividly demonstrates the power of social interaction and attachment. Published July 29, 2013.

11. Who Feels Treated Unfairly After Taking An Assessment?

Researchers Laura Honkaniemi, Taru Feldt, Riitta-Leena Metsäpelto, and Asko Tolvanen identified three personality types who differ in their Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness. They found that people hold different perceptions of the fairness of personality testing depending on their personality type: Overcontrolled, Undercontrolled, Resilient, or Bohemian according this summary published in the “British Psychological Society Research Digest”, August 1, 2013.

12. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Worksheets

Free downloadable cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) worksheets, formulations, and self-help resources including blank formulations, thought records, cognitive restructuring worksheets, diaries/data gathering sheets, mechanisms, information sheets, techniques/procedures, useful tools, forgiveness tools, and formulations for specific disorders, all in PDF format.

13. Stacked (Forced) Ranking

From Michael Britt at “The Psych Files”: “Here’s a sound byte from an episode of TWIT (This Week in Technology: http://twit.tv/twit) podcast in which Leo Laporte and John Dvorak discuss the negative effects of a performance appraisal system often called Stacked or Forced ranking. Psychologists refer to scales like this as ordinal scales”. From July 15, 2012, show #362. (This audio clip runs 1 minute, 55 seconds).

14. Forced Ranking: The Poisonous Employee-Ranking System That Helps Explain Microsoft’s Decline

Writing for “Slate Magazine”, Will Oremus, on August 23, 2013 claims that “Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer oversaw a system called “stack ranking,” in which employees on the same team competed directly with one another for money and promotions. Critics say this rewarded brown-nosing and sabotage”.

15. Microsoft’s Lost Decade Due to Forced Ranking Appraisal Systems

Kurt Eichenwald argues that a forced ranking system may have had negative effects on Microsoft’s corporate culture. From “Vanity Fair”, August 2012.

16. Chance

J. Laurie Snell of Dartmouth College presents this page of resources for teaching a course in probability and statistics including videos, audios, syllabi, activities, computer simulations, data sets, links to internet resources, and a Teacher’s Guide for teaching a quantitative literacy course.

17. The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation

The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University presents this extensive online resource which features resources to help new and established faculty design and teach a course, incorporate technology, assess teaching and learning, apply principles of teaching and learning, and more.

18. Teaching Ethics to Undergraduate Psychology Students (TEUPS)

TEUPS is a centralized location for faculty looking for ideas for activities, articles, books, associations, videos, films, lectures, and other resources that are related or could be useful in incorporating ethics into the undergraduate psychology curriculum. This website will be an invaluable resource for those interested in following APA recommendations regarding the teaching of ethics as presented in the Principles for Quality Undergraduate Education in Psychology (2011) and the Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major (2007).

19. Favorite Link Revisited: U.C. Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning

U.C. Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning presents this compendium of classroom-tested strategies and suggestions designed to improve the teaching practices of all college instructors, including beginning, mid-career, and senior faculty members. The page features links to teaching tools that cover both traditional practical tasks–writing a course syllabus, delivering an effective lecture–as well as newer concerns such as technology and online learning.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 6, February, 2013

February 27, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,740 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Have you ever wondered what is all the fuss about the “Twilight” series? This month we are pleased to bring you a chapter from Donna Ashcraft’s new book “Deconstructing Twilight”. In it, she takes psychological and feminist approaches to understanding the characters. She and her publisher have graciously agreed to let “Personality Pedagogy” publish Chapter 7 from her book. Here, she analyzes Bella and her relationships with her parents and with Edward to illustrate aspects of Karen Horney’s theory. Ashcroft’s analysis is sure to spark discussion among your fan-students and to get you to think about young adult literature — and personality theories — in a new way.

This month, in honor of using fictional characters as case studies to illustrate personality theories, we revisit one of our favorite links. The NPR program “In Character” presents an in-depth look at more fictional characters suitable for analysis in your personality class.

Finally, I just couldn’t resist throwing in the “World’s Shortest Personality Test” (see link below). My students enjoyed taking it and critiquing it afterwards. We were able to draw on their “results” to see if it matched up to their personality according to a valid measure of the Five Factors. They could readily understand convergent validity and the need for criterion validity through this little demonstration. Try it!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Deconstructing Twilight

Drawing on classic theorists including Carl Jung, Karen Horney, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers and others, Donna Ashcraft takes a psychological and feminist approach to understanding the “Twilight” characters in her book “Deconstructing Twilight: Psychological and Feminist Perspectives on the Series”. Thanks to her publisher, Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., you can read and download a PDF of Chapter 7 in which she uses Karen Horney’s 10 neurotic needs to understand the dynamics between Bella and her parents, Bella and Edward, and more. The second link takes you to the Amazon.com page for her book.

3. World’s Quickest Personality Test

Are you imaginative, analytical, or suspicious? Richard Wiseman describes how to assess your personality via this quick measure. A fun way to introduce personality testing and the importance of validity to your students. (runs 1 minute, 26 seconds).

4. Men Are From Earth, Women Are From Earth

“From empathy and sexuality to science inclination and extroversion, statistical analysis of 122 different characteristics involving 13,301 individuals shows that men and women, by and large, do not fall into different groups” according to research by Bobbi Carothers and Harry Reis (2013) published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”. Includes a graphic comparing distributions of men and women on physical strength and masculinity-assertiveness; and a video of Harry Reis explaining their work and what it means (runs 3 minutes, 24 seconds).

5. Willpower Expert Roy Baumeister on Staying in Control

Roy Baumeister explains what willpower is, what depletes our willpower, and how we can manage our willpower to achieve our goals in this interview from “Time”, January 14, 2013.

6. Mistakes Improve Children’s Learning While Building Competence and Autonomy

We need not always protect children from mistakes; mistakes can be part of the learning and discovery process and actually increase learning. Children build competence through mastering challenges, and autonomy though trying new approaches.

7. How to Become Highly Skilled in CBT

“In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Drs. Aaron and Judith Beck discuss the process of improving as a therapist. Like most skills, excellent therapy skills are achieved over time with good training and experience. Dr. Aaron Beck emphasizes the importance of utilizing patient feedback, as well as learning from colleagues and supervisors. Dr. Judith Beck discusses the importance of keeping an open mind in one’s progression as a therapist, including incorporating new techniques from other fields of therapy within the CBT framework.” Published by the Beck Institute, January 16, 2013.

8. Design Your Own Implicit Association Tests (IAT)

Adam Meade, North Carolina State University, has created this website where researchers can create their own IATs using free open-source software on this website.

9. Research Methods and Statistics Concept Maps

Alexis Grosofsky, Beloit College, created these concept maps of topics typically covered in undergraduate methods and statistics courses. These maps will help students organize material and see the “bigger picture” of how these concepts relate to each other. Each of these 11 maps could be used as an introduction, summary, or quick refresher (opens in PDF format).

10. Teaching Statistics: Not Awful and Boring

Jessica Hartnett, Gannon University, started this blog where she shares online resources for teaching statistic to undergraduates. In her own words: “Most of [the suggestions] are funny. A few of them are serious but engaging. At no point will I suggest that you count M&M colors (although there is nothing wrong with that). Also, I’m not making any money off of this, I just know how hard it can be to teach statistics/research methods and thought I would share what I have.”

11. fMRI: Real-Time Self-Regulation of Emotion Networks

Using fMRI, 8 patients with depression were able to increase activity in areas of the brain related to positive emotion and lowered their depression through neuro(bio)feedback. A control group who went through similar cognitive strategies but without the feedback did not show such improvement. Includes downloadable slides of their findings.

12. Mindfulness neuroscience

Neuropsychologist Deric Bownds summarizes findings from a special issue of the journal “Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience” devoted to meditation and the brain. He describes four possible mechanisms by which meditation works and discusses the problem of control groups and random assignment in meditation research.

13. Do You Know What Determines Your Happiness?

Eric Karpinski, muses on the impact of genetics, external circumstances, and our own actions and thoughts on our happiness. Posted August 11, 2011.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: In Character: Tricksters, Vamps, Heroes, Scamps

“From Darth Vader to Scarlett O’Hara, the best fictional characters reflect something about who we are and how we got here.” In Character, “a [2008] six-month series from NPR, explores indelible American characters from fiction, folklore and pop culture.” Hear experts discuss the psychology of characters such as Vernon Waters (“A Soldier’s Story”), Willie Stark (“All the King’s Men”), Charlotte (“Charlotte’s Web”), Auntie Mame, Uncle Tom, Henry Fleming (“The Red Badge of Courage”), The Joker, Norman Bates, Nancy Drew, Jo March (“Little Woman”), King Kong, Mr. Spock, Carrie (“Sex and the City”), Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Ricky Ricardo, Charlie Brown, Fred Sanford, Indiana Jones, Dora the Explorer, Mama Rose, Hanibal Lecter, Portnoy, Eric Cartman (“South Park”), Walter Mitty, Catwoman, Blanche DuBois, Captain Ahab, Barbie, Harriet the Spy, Hester Prynne (“The Scarlet Letter”), Elmer Gantry, Darth Vader, Gordon Gekko (“Wall Street”), Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp, Cookie Monster, George Jefferson, Willy Loman (“Death of a Salesman”), Huckleberry Finn, Scarlett O’Hara, Pollyanna, Holden Caulfield, The Lone Ranger, Lassie, Bugs Bunny, and others.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 5, January, 2013

January 26, 2013

Hello and welcome to the seventy-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,725 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Happy New Year! Happy New Month! And for many of you, Happy New Semester! As much as I hate the darkness of winter here on the East Coast, I do relish the chance to start again with new beginnings. If you are like me, then you will welcome this month’s newsletter filled with new things to refresh and renew your personality psychology classes.

Speaking of happy, we’ve got a bit of a debate of sorts happening in this issue. Check out three of our newest links suggesting that money does buy happiness —  but that there’s more to life than being happy, and judge for yourself.

This month marks 20 years since the first fMRI study was published. To celebrate, the APS journal Perspectives on Psychological Science features a special section in which leading scientists reflect on the contributions this brain scanning technique has made to our understanding of human thought. While not strictly related to personality, the reflections are nonetheless interesting. Check it out here.

Special thanks goes out to Jon Mueller for the link to the Easy Bake Oven controversy (see below). Be sure to check out his newsletter and website if you are interested in teaching social psychology.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Maslow’s Theory of Self-Actualization, More or Less Actualized

Psychologist Ann Reitan reflects on Abraham Maslow’s notion of self-actualization. First, she explains what it is, then she muses on what it means for different people at different times in their lives, drawing on the work of Eric Erikson. Finally, she suggests that self-actualizing people may find meaning at lower levels of the hierarchy, such as when their needs are being threatened. She gives examples of people who she believed were actualizing while facing death (e.g., Viktor Frankl), fearing for their safety (e.g., Nelson Mandela), losing their freedom (e.g., Ghandi), and experiencing mental illness (e.g., Sylvia Plath). From “Brain Blogger”, January 8, 2013.

3. There’s More to Life Than Being Happy

According to Viktor Frankl, “It is the very pursuit of happiness that thwarts happiness,” and yet Americans and American psychology are obsessed with happiness. Meaningfulness and happiness are not the same thing, and this article draws on new work by Roy Baumeister, Kathleen Vohs, Jennifer Aaker & Emily Garbinsky (2013) to understand the difference. From “The Atlantic”, January 9, 2013. Their forthcoming paper in the “Journal of Positive Psychology” is available here: http://tinyurl.com/b8mbayk (opens in PDF format).

4. Yes, Money Does Buy Happiness: 6 Lessons from the Newest Research on Income and Well-Being

A summary of 6 observations from the paper “The New Stylized Facts about Income and Subjective Well-Being” by Daniel W. Sacks, Betsey Stevenson, and Justin Wolfers. From “The Atlantic,” January 10, 2013.

5. Implicit Assessment of The Five Factors

Researches have hit upon an implicit way of measuring personality, the “semantic misattribution procedure”. “In this initial study, and two more involving nearly 300 participants … participants’ scores on this test for conscientiousness, neuroticism and extraversion correlated with explicit measures of the same traits. The new implicit test also did a better job than explicit measures alone of predicting relevant behaviours, such as church attendance, perseverance on a lab task, and punctuality. The implicit scores for extraversion showed good consistency over 6 months. Finally, the new implicit test showed fewer signs of being influenced by social desirability concerns, as compared with traditional explicit measures.” From “BPS Research Digest”, December 13, 2012.

6. Assessing Personality via Social Media Postings: TruthSerum.com

TruthSerum.com claims to assess personality though people’s social media posts. Users can analyze their own personality and see how they compare to Barak Obama, Mitt Romney, Abraham Lincoln, the Unabomber Ted Kaczynski and some 135 other famous people on Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Machiavellianism, Narcissism, and Psychopathy (aka, Psychoticism).

7. You Can’t See It, But You’ll be a Different Person in 10 Years

“No matter how old people are, they seem to believe that who they are today is essentially who they’ll be tomorrow.” according to the End of History Illusion. According to researcher Daniel Gilbert, “Life is a process of growing and changing, and what our results suggest is that growth and change really never stops … despite the fact that at every age from 18 to 68, we think it’s pretty much come to a close.” You can listen to the original segment and comment by Gilbert here, on the NPR website (runs 3 minutes, 58 seconds) or read a more in-depth summary from the “New York Times” here.

8. Sexism-Free Easy Bake Oven On the Way

Due to the protests started by 13-year old McKenna Pope (here) and backed by big-name chefs including Bobby Flay, and the general public, Hasbro, the makers of the class Easy-Bake, oven will launch a new line of gender-neutral ovens that will feature gender-neutral colors and more boys in their advertisements.

9. Activities Guide: Teaching Ethics in the Introduction to Psychology Course

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) is pleased to announce this new resource for teachers by Ana Ruiz and Judith Warchal of Alvernia University. “This 23-page guide presents 17 activities related to ethics for each chapter in a typical Introduction to Psychology text as it integrates the APA Learning Goals and Outcomes for ethics into that course.  For each chapter, the activity lists the student learning outcome, instructions for conducting the activity, materials needed, approximate time required, and a method of assessment.” Activities most relevant to the personality class include APA ethics code jeopardy, research methods, personality testing, and debating controversial topics.

10. Who’s Gay On TV? Dads, Journalists, Investigators, And Footmen

Presents an interesting account of the various portrayals of gays and lesbians found on TV today. Though the number of gays and lesbians has increased in recent years, for some, the portrayals may not be as realistic as they could be. Published January 3, 2013. (also available in audio running 7 minutes, 45 seconds).

11. Gorillas, Watermelons and Sperm: The Greatest Genomes Sequenced in 2012

Scientists identified the genetic codes of some of the world’s most fascinating animals and plants. Check out what they found in this online photo gallery of 8 stunning images posted by “Popular Science”, January 2, 2013.

12. The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational

A good summary of 12 common flaws in our thinking including the confirmation bias, gambler’s fallacy, neglecting probability, the current moment bias, the anchoring effect, and more.

13. A Chart of Emotions that Have No Names in the English Language

Designer Pei-Ying Lin has created interesting conceptual charts of emotions including one for emotions that have no names in the English language and another for new emotions invented by the Internet.

14. Neurotic People Might Have Better Health Outcomes When They are High in Conscientiousness.

People who are high in Neuroticism and Conscientiousness experience lower levels of Interleukin 6 (IL-6), a biomarker for inflammation and chronic disease; lower body-mass index scores; and fewer diagnosed chronic health conditions. From “Prevention News”, November 2012.

15. Darwin Was Wrong About Dating

New research is beginning to question the long-accepted evolutionary explanation for various mating behaviors. Read about some of the alternative explanations and new data on sex differences in mating strategies, selectiveness, and desire for casual sex. From “The New York Times,” January 12, 2013.

16. Favorite Link Revisited: Careers in Psychology

From the website: “Are you preparing yourself for a career in psychology? Well, you’ve come to the right place! We understand your enthusiasm and eagerness to get started in a growing and lucrative field like psychology. However, we also know how difficult it can be to get started in this field, which is exactly why we’re here.” The site features background information on careers, degree paths, programs, internships, licensure information, interviews with psychology professionals, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 7, Number 1, September, 2012

September 29, 2012

Hello and welcome to the seventy-third Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,582 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

By now, many of us are fully into the swing of the new school year and another fall semester. At my school, many classes are having their first round of exams. For many students, this means hunkering down to the real work of the semester. For many faculty, it means lagging energy for prep work or temptation of the outdoors or other fall fun-related activities. We think the links below may be just the thing to lure your attention back into teaching personality!

This month we hit upon a web page of Mark Leary, a personality psychologist who has created a number of interesting scales, which he makes freely available on his website. We’ve added links to impostorism, propensity to blush, fear of negative evaluation, the need to belong, social physique anxiety, and others, bring our total number of valid and reliable personality tests to nearly 100, the largest collection anywhere on the web. To tie into this trove of materials, we’re revisiting one of our favorite links which introduces students to the Barnum Effect.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://www.arcadia.edu/personality-pedagogy-form.htm

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than “Personality Pedagogy”.

2. Five Keys to Enhancing Your Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence is “absolutely essential in the formation, development, maintenance, and enhancement of close personal relationships”. Find out how to increase your IQ using these five suggestions from Preston Ni for “Psychology Today”, January 2012.

3. Freud’s Not Dead; He’s Just Really Hard to Find

While traditional psychoanalysis does not qualify as an evidence-based treatment, this does not mean that Freud is dead according to Susan Krauss Whitbourne, for “Psychology Today”, May 2012.

4. Reading the Red Book: How C. G. Jung Salvaged His Soul

According to Stephen A. Diamond, “C.G. Jung’s  Red Book  begins as a detailed log of one man’s personal, lonely “nekyia” or night sea journey to the underworld and ends with his heroic return to the outer world renewed, much like a latter day Dante, Jonah or Ulysses. This, as he came to understand, is an excellent description of what real psychotherapy is or can be all about.” From “Psychology Today”, February 2011.

5. Phineas Gage For the 21st Century

A 24-year old Brazilian construction worker survived after a 6-foot metal bar fell from above and pierced his head according to this article from the Associated Press which ran August 17, 2012. Click here for a video version of the story (50 seconds).

6. Psychology’s Tall Tales: The Real Story of Phineas Gage

From the website: “Graduate student instructors can demonstrate the importance of critical thinking by taking a closer look at the tales of Kitty Genovese and Phineas Gage.” According to some psychologists and historians, Phineas Gage was not as impaired as was once thought, and was, in fact, able to hold down a steady job. (And, in case you were wondering, witnesses claim to have called the police and helped Genovese.)

7. TOPSS Lesson Plan Revised: Biological Bases of Behavior

Teaching of Psychology in the Secondary School (TOPSS) and the APA Education Directorate are pleased to announce a newly revised lesson plan on Biological Bases of Behavior. The lesson plan includes lessons on the brain and neural function, the neuron, the organization of the nervous system, localization of function of the brain, lateralization of function of the brain, the endocrine system, and behavioral genetics.  Five teaching activities are included in the unit plan, and two online modules aligned to the unit are also available through the website above, one on key points to remember in biopsychology and one of classroom demonstrations for the unit. Note: You must be a member of TOPSS to access the materials.

8. Gender: Philip Zimbardo: The Demise of Guys?

In this TED talk Psychologist Philip Zimbardo asks, “Why are boys struggling?” He shares some stats (lower graduation rates, greater worries about intimacy and relationships) and suggests a few reasons, and challenges the TED community to think about solutions. (Posted August 2011. Duration: 4:47)

9. Sexist Vintage Ads

The Huffington Post presents this slide show of 18 “cringe-worthy vintage ads targeting married couples.” A good way to start out a discussion of gender differences by getting students to think about what people once believed men and women to be like and discussing the evidence (or lack thereof) for some of these out-dated images.

10. Interaction Anxiousness

From Leary, M. R. (1983). Social anxiousness: The construct and its measurement. “Journal of Personality Assessment, 47”, 66-75.

11. Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation

From Leary, M. R. (1983). A brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale. “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 9”, 371-376.

12. Need to Belong

From Leary, M. R., Kelly, K. M., Cottrell, C. A., & Schreindorfer, L. S. (2007). Individual differences in the need to belong: Mapping the nomological network. Unpublished manuscript, Duke University.

13. Blushing Propensity

From Leary, M. R., & Meadows, S. (1991). Predictors, elicitors, and concomitants of social blushing. “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60”, 254-262.

14. Hurt Feelings

From Leary, M. R., & Springer, C. (2001). Hurt feelings: The neglected emotion. In R. M. Kowalski (Ed.), Aversive behaviors and relational transgressions. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

15. Impostorism

From Leary, M. R., Patton, K., Orlando, A., & Funk, W. W. (2000). The impostor phenomenon: Self-perceptions, reflected appraisals, and interpersonal strategies. “Journal of Personality, 68”, 725-756.

16. Social Physique Anxiety

From Hart, E. A., Leary, M. R., & Rejeski, W. J. (1989). The measurement of social physique anxiety. “Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 11”, 94-104.

17. Favorite Link Revisited: The Barnum Effect

Take this test to remind yourself why good personality tests should provide specific feedback…and why horoscopes are so much fun! This online test of 47 questions plus some background demographics gives the appearance of a legitimate personality test. Respondents receive the typical Barnum feedback and rate how accurate it is. The beauty of this on-line version is that students can change some of their answers and see that their description never changes. In the words of Prof. Birnbaum at Fullerton State who developed this page, “Self-validation is no validation” according to the explanation given here.