Volume 1 September 2006-August 2007

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This page contains Volume 1 of newsletters from September 2006-August 2007.

September 2006

October 2006

November 2006

December 2006

January 2007

February 2007

March 2007

April 2007

May 2007

June 2007

July 2007

August 2007

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August 2007

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 12, August, 2007

Hello and welcome to the twelfth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting
what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

You may have noticed our site acting funny and responding very slowly this month. Arcadia University is in the middle of upgrading our server, so please be patient over the next week or so until the changeover is complete. Alas, we may even have periods when the site is not accessible at all! Be assured that we are working to bring you a better and faster Personality Pedagogy in the near future.

The big news for those of us teaching personality psychology this month, was the death of the unconventional and controversial pioneer and founder of rational emotive behavior therapy, Albert Ellis. In his honor, links have been added including audio/video of interviews and of therapy sessions, as well as his last media interview and his New York Times obituary.

We’ve just created a new wiki page ripe for your personal contributions: “Examples for Erikson’s 8 Stages of Development”. Visit this page or any of the other pages open for editing and join our Contribution Contest. If you submit an idea for the site OR if add your contribution to one of the editable wiki pages you will be eligible to win a prize. The submitter of the best contribution will win their choice of one of the following three terrific teaching resources:

1. Handbook of the Teaching of Psychology by Stephen F. Davis and William Buskist
2. What the Best College Teachers Do by Ken Bains
3. Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms by Will Richardson.

AND, thanks to Amy Sweetman of Los Angeles City College, the creator of Introductory Psychology Resources wiki (see: http://www.intropsychresources.com/), the first 20 contributors to Personality Pedagogy will receive a neurotransmitter molecule key chain (see: http://www.dopaminejewelry.com). These key chains are attractive and make an interesting conversation piece.

Visit our home page for details on how to contribute your ideas to the wiki portion of the site. Don’t be shy — remember that we are looking for contributions to the teaching of personality psychology at all levels, from High School AP Introductory Psychology to an Upper-level elective in personality to a Graduate-level seminar on current research in personality psychology. Don’t be shy!

Enjoy these last few weeks of summer before we have to gear up for a brand-new semester and teaching year ahead. Until then, check out our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. Albert Ellis

a) Influential Figure in Modern Psychology, Dies at 93. New York Times obituary by Michael T. Kaufman, July 24, 2007.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/24/obituaries/24cnd-ellis.html?ex=1342929600&en=ae2b9ec420ea7f40&ei=5090&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss

b) Last Interview with Albert Ellis
http://www.prospect-magazine.co.uk/article_details.php?id=9738

c) Albert Ellis Doing REBT with Jeffrey Guterman (7 minutes, 45 seconds). The actual therapy portion is audio only.

d) Jeffrey Guterman Interviews Albert Ellis: Part I, 1988 (3 minutes, 36 seconds)

e) Jeffrey Guterman Interviews Albert Ellis: Part II, 1989 (3 minutes, 40 seconds)

2. Which is the Chattier Gender?
http://uanews.org/cgi-bin/WebObjects/UANews.woa/33/wa/SRStoryDetails?ArticleID=14010

New research by Matthias Mehl at the University of Arizona “challenges the notion — frequently communicated in major publications, broadcast media and popular entertainment — that women talk significantly more than men.”

3. Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast)
http://www.shrinkrapradio.com/index.html

#98 – Sound-Seeing Tour at A Dream Conference
In this Podcast Dr. Dave, a.k.a. David Van Nuys, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Sonoma State University, interviews “fascinating personalities in and around the broad field of psychology” and gives you “All the psychology you need to know and just enough to make you dangerous.” Each episode often includes recommendations for background reading. In this episode, Dr. Dave “interviews a variety of presenters and participants at the 24th International Association for The Study of Dreams conference held at Sonoma State Universiy, California June 29 – July 3, 2007. This is a remarkable organization inasmuch as it welcomes academic researchers, therapists of all stripes, and other dreamwork practitioners under the same tent.”

4. Erikson’s Eight Stages of Life
http://www.thepsychfiles.com/2007/07/09/episode-20-eriksons-eight-stages-of-life/

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, broadcasts a podcast about psychology called The Psych Files. In this show (Episode 21) featuring interviews with people at the various stages, he takes “a stroll through the various phases of life: from childhood, to adolescence, into mid-life and then we listen to two interesting voices of men nearing the end of their lives and they do so with very different perspectives, John Wayne and Roy.”

5. In Defense of Defense Mechanisms
http://www.thepsychfiles.com/2007/02/25/episode-5-in-defense-of-defense-mechanisms/

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, broadcasts a podcast about psychology called The Psych Files. This show (Episode 5) is subtitled “Don’t Throw Freud out with the Bathwater”. According to Brit: “Too many people dismiss Freud just because he, admittedly, had a few crazy ideas (“penis envy” for example), but as I try to point out in this podcast, many of Freud’s ideas were very influential and can, with a little attention, be seen in everyday life.” The website also features an overview of the defense mechanisms with examples.

6. e-perceptions and the Five Factor Model
http://www.youjustgetme.com/

The ”You Just Get Me” website asks visitors ”Do you get people, even if you just met them? Do the people in your life truly get you?” Using the Five-Factor model, respondents answer 43 questions about their personality and try to guess the personality of other visitors. Based on the research of Vazire & Gosling (2004) (see below).

7. Vazire & Gosling, (2004): e-perceptions
http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/faculty/Gosling/reprints/JPSP04ePerceptions.pdf

Vazire, S., & Gosling, S. D. (2004). e-Perceptions: Personality impressions based on personal websites. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 87, 123-132. (in PDF format)

8. Freud’s Case of Herr E
http://www.haverford.edu/psych/ddavis/freud_e.html

Doug Davis of Haverford College, reconstructed this case study from Freud’s Correspondence with Wilhelm Fleiss. Filled with self-analysis and counter-transference, the case reveals as much about Freud himself as about ”Herr E”.

9. Psychosocial Theory of Erikson
http://www.haverford.edu/psych/ddavis/p109g/erikson.stages.html

Doug Davis of Haverford College and Alan Clifton of Clark University wrote this very advanced outline of Erickson’s theories including a discussion of zones, modes and modalities, ego psychology, and an extensive description of the 8 stages of development.

July 2007

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 11, July, 2007

Hello and welcome to the eleventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting
what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Summertime and the livin’ is easy…as the song goes. So we’ll keep this newsletter short and sweet.

Don’t forget that in celebration of our first year, we are having a Contribution Contest. From now to the end of August, if you submit an idea for the site OR if add your contribution to one of the editable wiki pages you will be eligible to win a prize. The submitter of the best contribution will win their choice of one of the following three terrific teaching resources:

1. Handbook of the Teaching of Psychology by Stephen F. Davis and William Buskist
2. What the Best College Teachers Do by Ken Bains
3. Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms by Will Richardson.

Visit our home page for details on how to contribute your ideas to the wiki portion of the site and in the meantime, check out our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues.

Cheers,
Marianne
miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast)
http://www.shrinkrapradio.com/index.html

#97 The Freud/Jung Letters
In this Podcast Dr. Dave, a.k.a. David Van Nuys, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Sonoma State University, interviews “fascinating personalities in and around the broad field of psychology” and gives you “All the psychology you need to know and just enough to make you dangerous.” Each episode often includes recommendations for background reading. In this episode, Dr. Dave talks with Freud scholar Dr. Douglas A. Davis,  about a book chapter he wrote on the letters between Freud and Jung.

2. Sheldon’s Somatotypes
http://www.jiskha.com/social_studies/psychology/somatotypes.html

A good overview of William H. Sheldon’s somatotype theory and description of endomorphs, ectomorphs and mesomorphs.

3. Exploring the Five Factor Model
http://www.class.uidaho.edu/psyc310/lessons/lesson03/lesson03-1_homework.htm

Kenneth Locke at the University of Idaho designed this homework assignment for his psychology of personality class. Students take a 60-item version of the NEO, score it, and think about what it means.

4. Psychology of Personality
http://www.class.uidaho.edu/psyc310/

Kenneth Locke at the University of Idaho is teaching this Psychology of Personality class online this summer. Check out the many resources available here, including slides, audio lectures, and written transcript of audio lectures.

5. Writing the Empirical Journal Article
http://dbem.ws/WritingArticle.pdf

Taken from the 2003 book The Compleat Academic: A Career Guide by John M. Darley, Mark  P. Zanna, and Henry L. Roediger, this chapter provides a step by step guide to understanding what goes where in a APA-format paper. Also includes a guide to good writing and avoiding common grammatical errors.

6. Citing Electronic References in APA Format
http://www.apastyle.org/elecref.html

The American Psychological Association updates this page regularly as new types of media emerge requiring additions, changes, or clarifications to APA style.

7. Active Learning
http://www.active-learning-site.com/index.html

Charles Bonwell maintains this site to support “the scholarship of teaching by providing research-based resources designed to help faculty use active learning successfully in college and university classrooms.”

8. Ages in Stages: An Exploration of the Life Cycle based on Erik Erikson’s Eight Stages of Human Development
http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1980/1/80.01.04.x.html

Margaret Krebs-Carter designed this activity for High School English or Developmental Psychology classes and gives this description: ”How does age make a difference in the way we act/think/feel? Erik Erikson, the well-known teacher and psychiatrist who popularized the term “identity crisis” claims that we are greatly affected by the developmental changes that we undergo as we mature. This curriculum unit pursues the question of age differences by focusing on Erik Erikson’s theory of human development—the eight stages. Included in this unit are: 1) brief explanations of the eight stages; 2) recommended readings—short stories, plays, and novels—that illustrate the emotional crises that occur during these eight stages; 3) activities to introduce the new concepts; 4) suggestions of theoretical material for students to read; 5) a description of how to structure the classroom in order to teach a class in which group participation is encouraged.”

9. Erikson’s Eight Ages of Man
http://www.ceed.pdx.edu/ectc_sscbt/pdfs/EriksonsEightAgesofMan.pdf

David Elkind (1970) Erikson’s Eight Ages of Man, New York Times Magazine, April 5, 1970, pp. 25-27, 84, 87, 89, 90, 92.

10. Teaching Tips
http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/teachtip.htm#techniques

Honolulu Community College maintains this extensive site for Faculty Development. Features Teaching Tips on practically everything from Assessment, to Motivation, Course Design, Dealing With Stress, Difficult Classroom Behaviors, Professional Ethics and much more.

June 2007

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 10, June, 2007

Hello and welcome to the tenth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting
what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month Personality Pedagogy celebrates its first birthday. The site just keeps growing with a hit rate of almost 400 hits per day which has been steadily rising over the past year. Even more impressive is that 80% of the hits are from new visitors. Clearly, we’ve come a long way and are providing a valuable resource to teachers of personality psychology.

Welcome to all of the visitors to the Personality Pedagogy poster at the Teaching Institute pre-conference at the Association for Psychological Science Conference in Washington, DC, last week. We got a lot of ideas and introduced many new people to the site.

One of the ideas that came up from talking to people at the conference is that visitors to the site may not be aware that Personality Pedagogy is really two web sites in one: a terrific resource for teaching personality and a wiki where you can share resources and connect with other instructors. The first part of the site is up and running, but the wiki part needs YOU. To celebrate our first year, we are having a Contribution Contest. From now to the end of August, if you submit an idea for the site OR if add your contribution to one of the editable wiki pages you will be eligible to win a prize. The submitter of the best contribution will win their choice of one of the following three terrific teaching resources:

1. Handbook of the Teaching of Psychology by Stephen F. Davis and William Buskist
2. What the Best College Teachers Do by Ken Bains
3. Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms by Will Richardson.

Visit our home page for details on how to contribute your ideas to the wiki portion of the site and in the meantime, check out
our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues.

Cheers,
Marianne
miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. SPSS Statistical Tutorials
http://www.stat.tamu.edu/spss.php

The Department of Statistics at Texas A&M put together these tutorials on using SPSS for data analysis. Includes informatiaon on installing and using SPSS, manipulating data, basic data analysis and graphs, regression, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Each topic contains a dozen or so tutorials on specific topics.

2. The Incredibles vs. American Idol
http://www.thepsychfiles.com/?p=39

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, has a podcast about psychology called The Psych Files. In an earlier episode (Episode 9) he asked the question: How Do You Really Raise Self-Esteem? He contrasts the messages of The Incredibles, where everybody is special to American Idol, where some people are talented and others are not, and uses psychological research to sort out which method is better for increasing self-esteem.

3. Genetics
http://www.psych.umn.edu/courses/spring07/yoonh/psy3135/lectures.htm

Henry Yoon at the University of Minnesota teaches a course on Individual Differences in which he presents an extensive overview of genetics. His lecture note are available in both PDF form.

4. Intelligence
http://www.psych.umn.edu/courses/spring07/yoonh/psy3135/lectures.htm

Henry Yoon at the University of Minnesota teaches a course on Individual Differences in which he presents an overview of intelligence. His lecture note are available in both PDF form.

5. Fixed vs. Growth Theory of Intelligence

From the website: “In a conversation with Stanford Report writer Lisa Trei, psychologist Carol Dweck says people’s self-theories about intelligence have a profound influence on their motivation to learn. Those who hold a “fixed” theory are mainly concerned with how smart they are—they prefer tasks they can already do well and avoid ones on which they may make mistakes and not look smart. In contrast, she says, people who believe in a “growth” theory of intelligence want to challenge themselves to increase their abilities, even if they fail at first”.

6. Daniel Gilbert: Synthetic Happiness

From the website: “Dan Gilbert is a psychology professor at Harvard, and author of Stumbling on Happiness. In this memorable talk, filmed at TED2004, he demonstrates just how poor we humans are at predicting (or understanding) what will make us happy. (Recorded July 2005 in Oxford, UK. Duration: 22:02)”

7. Classical Conditioning illustrated via The Office

Jim, from the NBC comedy The Office, trains Dwight using principles of classical conditioning in this 1 minute 9 second video.

May 2007

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 9, May, 2007

Hello and welcome to the ninth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The big news this month is that I will be presenting a poster at the pre-conference Teaching Institute at the Association for Psychological Science Conference in Washington, DC, on May 24, from 11:30am-12:30pm. This poster will describe the work weíve been doing on Personality Pedagogy and discuss the role of wikis in the teaching of psychology. Stop on by to say ìhelloî and tell us what you like best about the site. Free Personality Pedagogy bookmarks to all visitors!!

This month weíve also added some new topics: Aaron Beck and the Cognitive Perspective. Be patient as we cross-reference links from other pages here. When in doubt, remember that you can always search for your desired topic in the search box at the top left of any page.

This monthís challenge is to send us your own class activities. Weíd like to extend this site to include original material, not just links. We know youíre very busy this time of year, but please take a few moments to reflect on the ìpeak momentsî in teaching personality from this past semester (or year) and send us your favorite ideas. Our team of reviewers will review and post them, and youíll be famousÖor at least published on the web!

We are looking forward to your contributions, but in the meantime, check out our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Good luck with final exams and all the activity that the end-of-the-semester brings.

Cheers,
Marianne
miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. Golf-Playing Parrot

Watch while AJ the parrot plays dead, rolls over, shakes hands, sinks a putt and more in this fun one-minute and 13 second video which illustrates the power of conditioning in animal training.

2. Shrink Rap Radio: A Psychology talk and Interview Show (Podcast)
http://www.shrinkrapradio.com/index.html
In this Podcast Dr. Dave, a.k.a. David Van Nuys, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Sonoma State University, interviews ìfascinating personalities in and around the broad field of psychologyî and gives you ìAll the psychology you need to know and just enough to make you dangerous.î Each episode often includes recommendations for background reading. Check out the following most relevant to personality (and be sure to visit the website for other fascinating topics):

a) Happy Birthday, Dr. Freud (Show #42, July 20, 2006)
ìOn the occasion of Sigmund Freud’s 150th anniversary year, Dr. Dave interviews Dr. Douglas A. Davis, who recently retired from full-time teaching at Haverford College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania where he was professor of psychology and for many years department chair. Among his many interests, Doug is a Freud scholar and heís also one of the most interesting conversationalists itís ever been my pleasure to know.î

b) Clinical Applications of Positive Psychology (Show #65 December 07, 2006)
ìJudy Saltzberg Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist who practices from a cognitive-behavioral perspective. A Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, she supervises therapists in training and has taught seminars in the University of Pennsylvania Resiliency program. She is interested in the application of positive psychology to clinical interventions.î

c) Discovering Positive Psychology (Show #61 November 20, 2006)
ìFor the past five years or so, Positive Psychology has been the next big thing in psychology. Dr. James Pawelski is currently the director of education at the University of Pennsylvaniaís Positive Psychology Center, which supports the Universityís newest masters program, the Master of Applied Positive Psychology. Before going to Philadelphia to teach at Penn, Dr. Pawelski served as an assistant professor of human and organizational development and religious studies at Vanderbilt University. He has a Ph.D. in philosophy from Penn State University and B.S. in mathematics. Dr. Pawelskiís main interests lie in the application of Positive Psychology in academic, professional and personal settings.î

d) Gestalt Therapy with Victor Daniels, Ph.D. (Show #21, June 04, 2006)
ìVictor Daniels is Professor of Psychology and past chair at Sonoma State University. As editor of the online journal, Gestalt, and teacher of a Gestalt Therapy class (which he and I co-taught years ago), he is an expert on the state of Gestalt Therapy today.î

3. Psychological Differences Between the Sexes: A time capsule from 1964
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8900617592234102951
This 1964 film claims that innate psychological and emotional differences between the sexes leads to problems relationship and strives to educate young people to avoid these problems. But according to psychological research in the 50 years or more since this film was produced are these truly sex differences or merely stereotypes? This obviously dated film is sure to spark discussion on these and related issues.

4. Cognitive Perspective and Aaron Beck http://www.psych.upenn.edu/courses/psych160_Spring2004/notes.html
Ron Noble and Jennifer Ostovich taught this personality class at the University of Pennsylvania in the Spring of 2004. You can download Part 1 and Part 2 of their lectures in PowerPoint Format (Beck is discussed in Part 2).

5. Resources for High School Teachers of Psychology
http://www.apa.org/ed/topss/
The American Psychological Association sponsors these resources for high school teachers of psychology. Includes teaching resources, national standards for high school psychology curricula, workshops and conferences, resources for students, and information about how teachers can join Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools (TOPSS).

6. Slide presentations (in PDF format) from Richard Ryanís Theories of Personality & Psychotherapy class at the University of Rochester:

a) Psychodynamic Psychologies
http://www.psych.rochester.edu/courses/181/psychodynamic.html
Includes Sigmund Freud, experimental tests of Freudís theory, object relations, ego psychology, Carl Jung, and Heinz Kohut.

b) Existential/Phenomenological Psychologies http://www.psych.rochester.edu/courses/181/existential.html.
Includes philosophical roots, Heideggar, Daseinanalysis, J.P. Sartre, Rollo May, and Irvin Yalom are from Richard Ryanís Theories of Personality & Psychotherapy class at the University of Rochester.

c) Person-Centered Approaches
http://www.psych.rochester.edu/courses/181/person-centered.html.
Includes Irvin Yalom and Carl Rogers and the implications of Rogerís theory for parenting, therapy, education and relationships.

d) Behavioristic Psychologies http://www.psych.rochester.edu/courses/181/behavioristic.html.
Includes Ivan Pavlov, John Watson, Mary Jones, Joseph Wolpe, B.F.Skinner, Julian Rotter, Martin Seligman, and Albert Bandura

e) Self-Determination Theory http://www.psych.rochester.edu/courses/181/selfdetermination.html.
Includes background of theory, types of motivation, and applications to weight loss, teaching and learning, well-being, and compliance to medical regimes.

April 2007

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 8, April, 2007

Hello and welcome to the eighth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

As you know, in February we launched our first discussion pages (for the Sigmund Freud and BF Skinner pages) and we opened up Erik Erikson’s Psychosexual Stages of Development, Freudian Slips, and Karen Horney’s Three Neurotic Personality Styles for editing by our users. Well, so far the response has been underwhelming! We really need your help to make this site grow so we are re-issuing our March challenge: Hit the edit button and add your own comment or example to one of these pages.

Both the discussion pages and example pages are password protected, but the passwords are given on the pages themselves. There is now a big link on the first page inviting visitors to contribute to the site in one of these ways.

We are looking forward to seeing what you have to say, but in the meantime, check out our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Good luck as many of your courses start to wind down this month!

Cheers,

Marianne

miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. Tests for Student Use

http://www.atkinson.yorku.ca/~psyctest/

Ron Okada, at York University, Toronto maintains this collection of tests that students can use in research including the Authoritarianism-Rebellion Scale, Survey of Recent Life Experiences, The Body Esteem Scale, The Body Awareness Scale, Personal Attribute Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Current Thoughts Scale, Trust Scale and much, much more.

2. Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls

http://www.apa.org/pi/wpo/sexualization.html

According to the Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls, “products and media that sexualize girls and girlhood saturate the environment in which girls develop and grow today. Girls who internalize these messages are more likely to experience low self-esteem, shame about their bodies, and depression and eating disorders, to take up smoking, and to have unprotected sex. They may be less able to focus on math and logic problems.  The report discusses positive alternatives and includes recommendations for research, practice, education and training, public policy, and public awareness”. Includes full text of the report, an Executive Summary, tips on “What Parents Can Do,” and media literacy resources.

3. MBTI Type Song (MP3 download)

http://tinyurl.com/3yoon9

The Washington DC based feminist dance-punk quartet Mess Up The Mess sings “You’re Not My (Myers-Briggs) Type”. You can check out the lyrics here: http://tinyurl.com/2hbxk2

4. Studying Personality Traits Across Cultures: Philippine Examples

http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~culture/church_katigbak.htm | Church & Katigbak (2002).

The Center for Cross-Cultural Research in Personality at the Western Washington University sponsors this on-line paper Studying Personality Traits Across Cultures: Philippine Examples by A. Timothy Church and Marcia S. Katigbak which discusses “whether traits are used in all cultures to understand persons and their behavior, the universality versus culture-specificity of traits, the validity of imported and indigenous measures of personality traits, and the meaningfulness of trait comparisons across cultures”. From Church, A. T., & Katigbak, M. S. (2002). Studying personality traits across cultures: Philippine examples. In W. J. Lonner, D. L. Dinnel, S. A. Hayes, & D. N. Sattler (Eds.), ”Online Readings in Psychology and Culture” (Unit 6, Chapter 2), Center for Cross-Cultural Research, Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington USA.

5. Traits and Taste in Music

http://www.outofservice.com/music-personality-test/

From the website: “What does your taste in music say about your personality? Find out with this quiz! This psychology test will tell you how other people see you based on what types of music you listen to. Results are instant, free, and anonymous.” Created by Jeff Potter based on the work of Samuel Gosling and his own on-going research.

March 2007

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 7, March, 2007

Hello and welcome to the seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

We have been busy this month – as I’m sure most of you are there are also – so there’s not much news to report but there’s a whole lot of new links! As you know, last month we launched our first discussion pages (for the Sigmund Freud and BF Skinner pages) and we opened up Erik Erikson’s Psychosexual Stages of Development, Freudian Slips, and Karen Horney’s Three Neurotic Personality Styles for editing by our users – i.e.  you! So this month we issue a challenge to our loyal users: Hit the edit button and add your own comment or example to one of these pages.

Both the discussion pages and example pages are password protected, but the passwords are given on the pages themselves. There is now a big link on the first page inviting visitors to contribute to the site in one of these ways. So your challenge for this month is to be a contributor to Personality Pedagogy!!

We are looking forward to seeing what you have to say, but in the meantime, check out our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Happy Spring!

Cheers,

Marianne

miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. The Kinsey Institute

http://kinseyinstitute.org/index.html

According to their website: ”The mission of the Kinsey Institute is to promote interdisciplinary research and scholarship in the fields of human sexuality, gender, and reproduction.” Includes an online gallery; library and archives; information about research both past and present; an opportunity to participate in online research; and more.

2.  The Personality System

http://www.thepersonalitysystem.org

John D. Mayer at the University of New Hampshire constructed and maintains this website on the Systems Framework. In his own words: ”The Systems Framework for personality is a framework designed to present the personality system in a powerful new way that more clearly communicates the goals, pursuits, findings, and significance of the discipline of personality psychology. The Systems Framework divides the discipline into four areas of study: 1. Identifying the personality system, 2. Understanding the parts of personality, 3. How personality is organized, and 4. How personality develops.” See also the companion Online Instructor’s Manual (http://tinyurl.com/27p7lq)which includes PowerPoint lectures, online student study guide, practice quizzes, and more.

3. Neuroscience

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/brain/scanning/

A companion site to the PBS series ”The Secret Life of the Brain” this site contains definitions and examples of CAT scans, PET scans, MRI, fMRI, MEG, a 3-D tour of the brain, and mind illusions. Divided into five segments (the baby’s brain, the child’s brain, the teenage brain, the adult brain, the aging brain), the site contains numerous video clips including infant vision, the birth of the brain, motherese, sleep, addiction, culture and schizophrenia, laughter, emotions, Alzheimer’s, memory, and more.

4. Cutting-Edge Brain Research

http://www.pbs.org/22ndcentury/

From the website: ”Many scientists and futurists believe we are on the verge of a technological revolution that will look like a page ripped directly from a scifi novel. 22nd Century dives head-first into this brave new world.” Episodes of this new PBS series are available from their website. Also check out interesting short excerpts on ”Telepathic Thought”, ”A Computer in his Skull”, ”A Computer for Your Eyes”, and ”Wiring Your Brain”.

5. Defense Mechanism Manual

http://tinyurl.com/2xhb2o

The Defense Mechanism Manual was developed by Phoebe Cramer and her colleagues ”to assess the use of three defenses—denial, projection, and identification—as revealed in stories told to standard TAT and CAT cards”. The Manual describes the scoring criteria and gives examples based on 3 standard TAT cards.

6. Validity and Reliability

http://tinyurl.com/2gtquh

Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley for the ”Research Design Explained” website provide these materials for students to administer a pencil-and-paper version of the Ice Cream Personality Test to a friend. Based on Miserandino, M. (2006), I scream, you scream: Teaching validity and reliability via the ice cream personality test. ”Teaching of Psychology, 33”, 265-268.

7. Jack Block

http://psychology.berkeley.edu/faculty/profiles/jblock.html

This page of Emeritus Professor Jack Block at University of California, Berkeley, contains links to his Curriculum Vitae, articles available online, and a listing of books and tests.

8. Operant Behavior

http://employees.csbsju.edu/tcreed/pb/operant.html#posrft

An overview and extensive examples from Tom Creed at College of Saint Benedict/Saint John’s University in Minnesota.

9. Maps of the Brain

http://brainmaps.org/

According to the website: ”BrainMaps.org is an interactive zoomable high-resolution digital brain atlas and virtual microscope that is based on over 15 million megapixels of scanned images of serial sections of both primate and non-primate brains and that is integrated with a high-speed database for querying and retrieving data about brain structure and function over the internet. Currently featured are complete brain atlas datasets for various species.”

February 2007

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 6, February, 2007

Hello and welcome to the sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

We did it! This month we unveil two new major changes which bring us ever closer to a true Wiki. First, discussion pages have been added to the Sigmund Freud and BF Skinner pages. If you go to these resource pages, you can click on a special link that will take you to a discussion page. Some discussion questions are posted there, but please feel free to add your own. If this format is useful, then we will add discussion pages to other topics. If there is a topic you would like to see a discussion page for, please let us know! Second, the following pages are open for editing: Erik Erikson’s Psychosexual Stages of Development, Freudian Slips, and Karen Horney’s Three Neurotic Personality Styles.
Both the discussion pages and example pages are password protected, but the passwords are given on the pages themselves. There is now a big link on the first page inviting visitors to contribute to the site in one of these ways.

Now you might wonder: if we want people to contribute, then why do we protect the pages with passwords? Or, why don’t we just open up the entire site to editing like Wikipedia does? Basically, we’re still a small operation and do not have a huge staff to monitor and clean up pages, so opening up the entire site would be taking a risk we’re just not capable of dealing with at this time. Also, having passwords — even if those passwords are readily available on screen — prevents spammers and web bots from hijacking the site. Already bots have filled in bogus information on our “join the newsletter” form! So, we are taking an admittedly conservative approach and only opening the site up to contributions from our users a little at a time.

In other news, Personality Pedagogy is now listed as a teaching resource on the Society for the Teaching of Psychology website (see http://tinyurl.com/26oqmw).

In the past month or so two other Wikis in psychology have been launched. Check out Introductory Psychology Resources started by Amy Sweetman at Los Angeles City College (see http://www.intropsychresources.com/) and Teach Psychoanalysis sponsored by the American Psychoanalytic Association (see http://tinyurl.com/y8hgrf). It’s a very exciting time for Wikis in education and we’re excited to be on the cutting edge of this trend.

Check out our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Happy February!

Cheers,
Marianne
miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. Life Story Interview
http://www.sesp.northwestern.edu/foley/instruments/
The Foley Center for the study of lives at Northwestern University maintains a collection of scales related to development and narrative across the life span. The Life Story Interview is one qualitative measure used by Dan McAdams and his research team.

2. Neuroscience for Kids
http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/experi.html
Eric H. Chudler and the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) sponsor this extensive and entertaining site for students and teachers filled with neuroscience activities. While much of the site is geared toward K-12, the site includes materials that are useful for higher levels including a newsletter, neuroscience in the news, postcards, books and articles, experiments and even “brain songs”.

3. Happiness and the Brain
http://tinyurl.com/y8efcz
The Dana Alliance, a nonprofit organization of brain research scientists, posts this overview of the neuroscience of happiness “Hardwired for Happiness” by Silvia Helena Cardoso.

4.  The Dana Sourcebook of Brain Science
http://www.dana.org/books/press/classroomsrcbk
The Dana Alliance, a nonprofit organization of brain research scientists offers The Dana Sourcebook of Brain Science, “a basic introduction to brain science, its history, our current understanding of the brain, new developments, and future directions” free to high school teachers and students and online as a PDF.

5. Human Genome Project
http://www.genome.gov/Pages/EducationKit/
The Human Genome Project created this free online multimedia educational kit “Exploring Our Molecular Selves” for high school students and the interested public. The kit can be viewed online or downloaded, and includes the following topics: A Dynamic Timeline; Genes, Variation and Human History; How to Sequence a Genome; Ethical, Legal and Social Issues; Bioinformatics; Exploring Our Molecular Selves (Video); and a Glossary of Genetic Terms.

6. Streaming Lectures on Freud, Jung, Erikson and more.
http://www.haverford.edu/psych/ddavis/p109g/p105g.04.html
Doug Davis, Haverford College, shares these notes from his “Foundations of Personality” class.

7. Erikson Stages
http://www.haverford.edu/psych/ddavis/p109g/erikson.stages.html
Doug Davis, Haverford College, shares these notes from his “Foundations of Personality” class. Written with Alan Clifton, these notes present an overview of Erikson’s theory and the Psychosexual Stages of Development.

8. Case Study: Eriksonian Identity Crisis: David
http://www.haverford.edu/psych/ddavis/p109g/david.html
Doug Davis, Haverford College, shares these notes from his “Foundations of Personality” class. This study is based on a case presented by M.B. Bowers. (1974). “Retreat from sanity: The structure of emerging psychosis”. Baltimore: Penguin.

9. Case Study: Eriksonian Identity Crisis: Nancy http://www.haverford.edu/psych/ddavis/psych214/nancy.html
Doug Davis, Haverford College, shares these notes from his “Foundations of Personality” class. This study is based on a case presented by M.B. Bowers. (1974). “Retreat from sanity: The structure of emerging psychosis”. Baltimore: Penguin.

10. Cultural Intelligence
http://linnvandyne.com/cq.html
Linn Van Dyne at Michigan State University does research on Cultural Intelligence: “the capability to function effectively in situations characterized by cultural diversity”. This page includes an overview of cultural intelligence, a description of the four factors of cultural intelligence, recent research, results, and the 20-item, four-factor Cultural Intelligence Scale (CQS).

11. Discovering Psychology Series Available for Online Streaming
http://learner.org/resources/series138.html
The complete updated series hosted by Philip Zimbardo is available online for streaming in the classroom or for outside of class viewing as well as in DVD format. Of the 26 half-hour programs, the ones most relevant to personality psychology include:

a) Understanding Research (Program 2)
From the website: “This program examines the scientific method and the ways in which data are collected and analyzed — in the lab and in the field — with an emphasis on sharpening critical thinking in the interpretation of research findings. With Dr. Christina Maslach of the University of California, Berkeley, and Dr. Daryl Bem of Cornell University. Updated”.

b) The Self (Program 15)
From the website: “Psychologists systematically study the origins of self-identity and self-esteem, the social determinants of self-conceptions, and the emotional and motivational consequences of beliefs about oneself. This program explores their methods of discovery. With Dr. Hazel Markus of Stanford University and Dr. Teresa Amabile of Harvard University. Updated.”

c) Testing and Intelligence (Program 16)
From the website: “This program peers into the field of psychological assessment — the efforts of psychologists and other professionals to assign values to different abilities, behaviors, and personalities. With Dr. Claude Steele of Stanford University and Dr. Robert Sternberg of Yale University. Updated.”

d) Sex and Gender (Program 17)
From the website: “This program explores the ways in which males and females are similar and different, and how gender roles reflect social values and psychological knowledge. With Dr. Michael Meaney of McGill University and Dr. Eleanor Maccoby of Stanford University.”

e) Cultural Psychology (Program 26)
From the website: “This newly emerging field is integrating cross-cultural research with social and personality psychology, anthropology, and other social sciences. Its main new perspective is centered on how cultures construct selves and other central aspects of individual personality, beliefs, values, and emotions ó much of what we are and do. This area has become more important in both psychology and American society with the globalization of our planet, increasing interaction of people from different cultural backgrounds, and emerging issues of diversity. With Dr. Hazel Markus of Stanford University, Dr. Kaipeng Peng of the University of California, Berkeley, and Dr. Ricardo Munoz of the University of California, San Francisco and San Francisco General Hospital. New.”

12. GLBT Alliance in Social and Personality
http://www.psych.utah.edu/gasp/index.html
From the website: “GASP (GLBT Alliance in Social and Personality) is a nonprofit organization affiliated with (but independent of) the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. GASP provides support and professional information to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) students and faculty in social and personality psychology and their heterosexual allies.” The site includes a data base of GASP Measures; information on research and funding; links to teaching resources; and a GLBT resources and mentor page.

January 2007

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 5, January, 2007

Hello and welcome to the fifth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

The newest changes are also the smallest this month: Lots of links have been added to the first page (APS, Arcadia University, my bio page at the Psychology Department of Arcadia University), “Video Clips” is now “Audio and Visual Resources” and descriptions have been added to explain the various resources available. In addition we have a new section just for case studies in personality psychology as distinct from abnormal or psychopathology case studies and we’ve added a section on the Authoritarian Personality.

You might also notice that all original material posted to Personality Pedagogy is now explicitly protected under the Creative Commons License (see the link at the bottom of the left column). This means that you may use materials that you find on the site with the proper attribution and that if you choose to distribute new works that you have created using material from the site you will freely distribute them under these same terms. For more information, please see http://creativecommons.org/

Here’s a handy tip for utilizing current events as examples in your classes. Did you know that you can subscribe to the New York Times on line for free (www.nytimes.com)? Current articles have hyperlinks to all related articles in the New York Times including photos, videos and other multimedia. You can read articles and “save” them to a scrapbook on the Times’ website. In this way you can keep articles relevant to class after they have been removed from public access.

Check out our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Happy New Semester!

Cheers,
Marianne
miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. Case Studies in Personality
a) Earnst
http://tinyurl.com/tfvjm
Doug Davis at Haverford posted these notes, described as “Robert White’s biographical presentation of “Earnst,” a subject in the classic study Explorations in Personality, by H. A. Murray’s group at the Harvard Psychological Clinic in the 1930s”. Includes a brief background, autobiography and responses to selected Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) cards. Illustrates Murray’s theories, needs, press, and the TAT.

b) Authoritarian Personality: Friedrich Menneke
http://tinyurl.com/y4t4vf
From the website: “In Cologne, students in a class on educational methods decided to delve deeper into the subject of the authoritarian character by taking an in-depth look at Friedrich Mennecke, the physician responsible for Operation T4, Vernichtung unwerten Lebens [destruction of those unworthy of living]. By analyzing documents, the students also learned about attempts to reintegrate perpetrators into postwar West German society.” Includes an extensive lesson plan and on-line access to primary source material including letters and biographies.

c) The Five Factor Model: Johnny Carson
http://tinyurl.com/tca7q
I noticed that the obituary of Johnny Carson is filled with personality descriptors making it a useful illustration of the five factor model of personality, personality stability, personality change, and personality coherence. (For the full description of how to utilize this obituary as a case study see Miserandino, M. (2007) Heeeere’s Johnny: A Case Study in the Five Factor Model of Personality, Teaching of Psychology, 34(1), 37-40.

d) Freud: The Case of Little Hans
http://www.holah.karoo.net/freud.htm
Mark Holah posts a brief synopsis of this classic case study in which Freud aims to cure a 5-year old boy of his phobia of horses. The case is a good example of the Oedipus complex and development during the Phallic Stage.

e) Eleanor Roosevelt
http://tinyurl.com/9wfe5
A popular assignment is to have students analyze the life of Eleanor Roosevelt from various perspectives or theories of personality psychology. There are many sites out there with information about Eleanor Roosevelt. In addition to the White House listing (above) she was also listed as Time Magazine’s 100 most important people of the 20th Century. Students can find websites of their own choosing or you may want to send students to the same 2-3 sites so that they are all working with the same information.

2. Freudian Fairy Tales?
http://teacherslounge.editme.com/FFT
“The Teacher’s Lounge”, a wiki of lesson plans and resources, includes this fun exercise. Students re-write a traditional fairy-tale to give a main character a Freudian personality disorder and in the process demonstrate their mastery of Freudian theory.

3. MIT Courses on line.
http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/index.htm
From the website: “MIT OpenCourseWare is a free and open educational resource for educators, students, and self-learners around the world. It includes publication of MIT course materials, does not require any registration, is not a degree-granting or certificate-granting activity and does not provide access to MIT faculty.” There’s no personality psychology course (yet!) but check out the following courses related to personality psychology:

a) Identity and Difference, Fall 2002
http://tinyurl.com/w5dao

b) Gender, Sexuality, and Society, Spring 2006
http://tinyurl.com/r4ues

c) Psychology of Gender, Spring 2003
http://tinyurl.com/y6rtba

d) Composing Your Life: Exploration of Self through Visual Arts and Writing, Spring 2006
http://tinyurl.com/y3op8n

e) Evolutionary Psychology, Spring 1999
http://tinyurl.com/y59rax

f) Cognitive Neuroscience, Spring 2004
http://tinyurl.com/ttkv7

g) Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings, Spring 2005
http://tinyurl.com/y6ukk7

4. Online Research Opportunity
http://www.utpsyc.org/
James W. Pennebaker maintains this page of a dozen or so online research projects. Most of them involve taking a brief survey or completing short exercises. The site provides feedback and insight into one’s personality. Topics include the TAT, Big Five, perceptual style, spirituality, depression and more.

5. American Psychoanalytic Association Online Teaching Resources
http://tinyurl.com/y8hgrf
From the website: “APsaA’s 10,000 Minds Project, an outreach task force on psychoanalysis and undergraduate education, believes that the future of psychoanalytic thought depends on engaging undergraduate college students in psychoanalytic ideas. This website contains curricula, syllabi, ideas, and resources for instructors who are introducing their students to psychoanalytic theory.”

December 2006

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 4, December, 2006

Hello and welcome to the fourth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting
what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Like most of you, we are just holding on until the end of the semester. But
thanks to the recent grant from the Association for Psychological Science
(APS) Fund for Teaching and Public Understanding of Psychological Science,
Personality Pedagogy will institute some exciting upgrades in 2007. Our
biggest plan is to start a discussion or talk page (like in Wikipedia) so
that instructors can discuss and share how they cover certain topics in
their classes. This will bring us closer to a true Wiki in the spirit of
Wikipedia (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page). Also, we have been
busy getting the word out about our Personality Pedagogy wiki to national
and regional teaching conferences. To this end, we are giving away really
cool, hand-made Personality Pedagogy bookmarks at a teaching conference near
you.

What’s particularly exciting is that Personality Pedagogy has been visited
by teachers in over 45 different countries in the past week including Iran,
Japan, Chile, the Republic of Korea, Egypt, Pakistan, Nigeria, Tanzania,
Israel, Ethiopia, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Romania, Thailand, and Jamaica. Despite
world  conflicts, committed teachers and students will find a way to
continue their education and open source, free, online web resources make it
possible. We are gratified to be a part of these efforts worldwide.

Once again, while the entire site is heavily utilized, the most popular
pages last week were Videos and Tests. Among the hottest topics last week
were Erik Erikson, Sigmund Freud, Abraham Maslow, Attachment theory, Carl
Rogers, and Temperament/Trait theories.

Where do we find resources to add to Personality Pedagogy? We have a number
of ways, but one of the best is to monitor the “chat” on the Psych-Teach
discussion list. When we see a hot topic or some good ideas, we try to
include them on Personality Pedagogy, since this indicates an important
issue to teachers out there. This is how the example page for the Erikson
stages was started in September (check it out and fee free to add your own
examples: http://tinyurl.com/y8cjj9), and how we found out about the exhibit
on gay animals at the Natural History Museum at the University of Oslo (see
below for link). Other ideas come from visiting web pages of expert
researchers and teachers, still others come from putting various terms in
Google.com and exploring sites up to 30 pages deep! Of course, if there is a
particular topic or link you would like to see included, please e-mail us.

Check out our new links this month described below. And feel free to pass
this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for
future issues. I hope that as the semester is winding down for you, it
brings with it the peace, love, and hope of the holidays! See you next year.

Cheers, Marianne
miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. Harry Potter and the California Child Q-set (CCQ).
http://www.personalitylab.org/
The Personality Lab website, by Chris Soto and colleagues, features three
versions of the California Child Q-set: The Understand Your Child Test, The
Understand Yourself Test, and The Find Your Hogwarts House Test. In this
latter test Harry Potter fans can discover which house of Hogwarts the
famous Sorting Hat would place them. Each test takes about 15 minutes and
the results are tallied instantly.

2. How the Grinch Stole Psychology Class:
http://teacherslounge.editme.com/HowtheGrinch
Ok, I’ll admit it, my elves and I are too swamped at the end of the semester
to find totally new material and this was just too darn good to not share,
especially in the spirit of the season. This link, submitted by Jim Matiya,
of Moraine Valley Community College, Palos Hills, Illinois, was another
great idea we stolen from the Psych-Teach discussion list. After watching
the 25 minute video of the classic Christmas story by Dr. Seuss, students
analyze the Grinch’s personality and change of heart using theories and
terms from personality including Freud, Adler, Horney, Maslow, and Rogers. A
great end-of-the-semester review.

3. Online Readings in Culture and Psychology:
http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~culture/readings.htm
The Center for Cross-Cultural Research at Western Washington University,
Bellingham, Washington, provides “Online Readings in Psychology and Culture”
edited by Walter J. Lonner, Dale L. Dinnel, Susanna A. Hayes, and David N.
Sattler. According to the website, the collection “is free to professors,
students, and others throughout the world. The articles, written by noted
scholars, may be used by professors to supplement lectures and textbooks in
any psychology course, or may be used as the primary readings for courses in
culture and psychology.”

4. Electronic text and a good example of research using the NEO-PI-R (in PDF
format): http://tinyurl.com/ymgt5f
McCrae, R. R., Terracciano, A. & 79 members of the Personality Profiles of
Cultures Project (2005). Personality Profiles of Cultures: Aggregate
Personality Traits. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 89(3),
407-425. This article, in PDF format, describes their research on
personality profiles of cultures. The article includes two summary figures
comparing Italians and Malays on the NEO-PI-R. The tables are a great way to
illustrate for students what an NEO-PI-R profile looks like, and how to
interpret scores and facets. A companion article in Current Directions in
Psychological Science (McCrae, R. R., & Terracciano, A., 2006, National
Character and Personality, 15(4), 156-161) presents the same work in a more
compact format with figures comparing Americans and Canadians on the
NEO-PI-R. A summary of this article (without the figures) is available at
http://tinyurl.com/yhwbde. Members of APS can access the complete article
(with figures) online by following the directions given at the end of the
summary.

5. Novel Drug Abuse Prevention Ads Get Strong Response from High-Sensation
Seekers
http://tinyurl.com/yyd8dk
According to the website of the National Institute on Drug Abuse: “A strong,
biologically based need for stimulation appears to make sensation-seeking
young adults more vulnerable to drug abuse. Now a NIDA-funded study has
shown that highly novel drug abuse prevention messages can capture the
attention of high-sensation-seeking young adults and get them to consider
participating in alternatives to drug abuse”. Read about the study and the
ad here.

6. Transgender individuals and gender identity:
http://www.apa.org/topics/transgender.html
The American Psychological
Association recently released these two new brochures on answers to common
questions about transgender individuals and gender identity.

7. Gay animals out of the closet?
http://www.nhm.uio.no/againstnature/index.html
The University of Oslo’s Natural History Museum in Norway, presents an
exhibit of 51 species of animals exhibiting homosexuality. According to
Petter Bockman, project coordinator of the exhibition, “Homosexuality has
been observed in more than 1,500 species, and the phenomenon has been well
described for 500 of them. The museum’s web site presents an excellent
overview of the exhibit which runs from October 2006-August 2007.

8.  Double your knowledge about Twin Research:
(a) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twin
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, has an excellent overview about the
genetics of twins.
(b) http://www.nyu.edu/classes/neimark/TWIN1.HTM
In August 1997 the magazine “Psychology Today” ran this summary of twin
research.

9. An Introduction to the Personal Construct Psychology of George A. Kelly
http://www.oikos.org/vincpcp.htm
Vincent Kenny first published this paper in the “Irish Journal of
Psychotherapy, 3(1),” March, 1984. Provides an extensive overview of the
major concepts of Kelly’s theory with references.

November 2006

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 3, November, 2006

Hello and welcome to the third Personality Pedagogy newsletter.

I am proud to announce that Personality Pedagogy won a grant a grant from the Association for Psychological Science (APS) Fund for Teaching and Public Understanding of Psychological Science. The grant covers a period of one year and includes funds to publicize the site at national and regional teaching conferences. To this end, we are giving away really cool, hand-made Personality Pedagogy bookmarks at a teaching conference near you.

Since the beginning of Personality Pedagogy this past June, the site has been visited by visitors in over 102 different countries (in 38 languages) and all 50 U.S. states.  The most popular pages are Videos; Tests, Measures and Scales; and Exercises. Among the hottest topics last week were Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers. The demand is particularly high for videos – especially for a video of Little Albert – and we have the best collection of links to videos for personality on the web!

In fact, in the last week or so, all of the theorist pages and all but a handful of topics (e.g. Culture, Ethics, Evolution, Field-Dependence, Genetics, Machiavellianism, Narrative Psychology, Physiology, Research Methods, Resilience, and Sexual Orientation) have been visited.

Please pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. I hope that your semester is going smoothly and is optimally-challenging!

Cheers,
Marianne

miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. Personality Labs: http://inst.santafe.cc.fl.us/~mwehr/PersonalityLabs.html

Marcia Wehr at Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville, Florida, has put together this extensive on-line course on Personality and Personal Growth. According to Wehr, this is ”an interactive web course that allows you to explore your own personality and development, meet the great theorists in the field of psychology and debate the importance and validity of their theories of human behavior as experienced in your personal journey”. The site features outlines, web resources, a World Lecture Hall, an on-line library, a hall of fame, and a laboratory of 15 exercises:

* Creating a Positive Personality Profile

* Exploring your “Big Five” Personality Traits

* Exploring Freud on the Web

* Personality Test online

* Exploring Personality Perspectives

* What is Your “Temperament”? – A Jungian Personality Inventory

* Exploring Personality Research Online: A World Wide Web Scavenger Hunt

* Exploring Trait Theory and Assessing Personality Traits

* Learning, Thinking and Intelligence

* What is your Emotional Intelligence?

* Exploratorium: Biological Foundations of Personality

* Humanistic Personality Theory

* Explore Conditioning and Behavior Modification

* Exploring Personality Disorders: A World Wide Web Scavenger Hunt

* Exploring Your Somatotype: Are there biological links to Personality?

2. TAT Card Responses: http://www.haverford.edu/psych/ddavis/psych212h/p212h.99

Doug Davis, Haverford College, as part of his Personality Assessment course, posted these 4 sets of responses to TAT cards. They include responses of a University of Michigan undergraduate woman, a Moroccan adolescent, and Haverford undergraduates to both computer stimulus and the standard cards.

3. Who Am I?: A Personality Project on Traits: http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/j/5/j5j/psy438/web438.html

John A. Johnson at Penn State University, DuBois, has students complete a 3-stage project on traits based on students’ own personality descriptions written on first day of class. In the process students learn about different kinds of traits, environmental and genetic influences on traits, and evaluate the Five-Factor Model and whether it confirms or contradicts their own analysis.

4. NEO Personality Inventory: http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/j/5/j5j/IPIP/

An online version of the IPIP representation of the NEO personality inventory. Includes both the original and a short version.

5. APA’s Guide to FAQs about Find Psychological Tests: http://www.apa.org/science/faq-findtests.html

The American Psychological Association’s Science Directorate put together this information on finding both published and unpublished psychological tests including finding information on a particular test, finding a particular type of test, locating a specific test, locating test publishers, purchasing tests, test references, software and scoring services, and background information on the proper use of tests.

6. Neuropsychology Central:  http://www.neuropsychologycentral.com/index.html

The objectives of this website are: ”1. To describe the importance of neuropsychology as a science of brain and behavior 2. To increase public knowledge of neuropsychology as a branch of practical medicine 3. To indicate the contribution which neuropsychology is making to the neurosciences and 4. To act as a resource for the professional and layperson.”

7. By Request: A new subscriber wondered if there was a site similar to Personality Pedagogy for social psychology. There are two sites loaded with teaching resources for social psychology:

Social Psychology Network: www.socialpsychology.org/teaching.htm

Jon Mueller’s Resources for the Teaching of Social Psychology Webpage and Newsletter: http://jonathan.mueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/crow/index.htm

October 2006

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 1, Number 2, October, 2006

Hello and welcome to the second Personality Pedagogy newsletter. Since the beginning of Personality Pedagogy this past June, the site has been visited by visitors in over 75 different countries (in 26 languages) and all 50 U.S. states.  The most popular pages are Videos; Tests, Measures and Scales; and Exercises. Among the hottest topics last week were Sigmund Freud, Attachment Theory, Abraham Maslow and B. F. Skinner.

In fact, in the last week or so, all of the theorist pages have been visited except for Otto Rank and all but a handful of topics (e.g. Physiology; Resilience; Narrative Psychology; Cognition and Perception; and Measurement, Validity and Reliability) have been visited.

We are constantly expanding our offerings. We especially need exercises and assignments (and apparently so do our visitors!). Don’t be shy, send me your ideas and I will post them with your name and affiliation. We still have a few opening for people willing to serve as reviewers and editors so that we can post materials that have been peer-reviewed for our site.

Could you use case studies of regular personality to present to your class? What topics give you trouble to present? Drop us an e-mail and we will try to solve your personality problems…pedagogical ones that is!

Please pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. I hope that the fall so far has been productive and exciting for you!

Cheers,
Marianne

miserandino@arcadia.edu

1. The 16 PF:  http://www.16pfworld.com/keyinfo.html.

Did you know that full-size samples of reports in 23 languages including Spanish, Japanese, Turkish, Dutch, French, Belgian, Portuguese of Brazil, and English for Australia, the UK, India, Canada, and South Africa are available on this site? These would be excellent examples to use in a class. The site also provides information and population norms.

2. Lecture notes: http://www.psych.upenn.edu/courses/psych160_Spring2004/notes.html

http://tinyurl.com/k2wqv Ron Noble and Jennifer Ostovich taught this personality class at the University of Pennsylvania in Spring of 2004. Check out their slide presentations for Psychodynamic, Learning, Social Learning, Cognitive, Existential, Humanistic, Biological, and Trait perspectives.

3. Sigmund Freud Speaks: http://www.freud-museum.at/e/index.html

The first time I heard these videos I got chills. Click on “Sigmund Freud Online” to find a media library with audio and video of Freud suitable for downloading or streaming.

4. Carl Jung Speaks: http://www.psicomundo.org/jung/

PsicoMundo, a Spanish language website about psychoanalysis, has two audio clips in their ”Galería de Sonidos” (Gallery of Sounds) of Carl Jung speaking (the clips are in English). ”Fragmento 1” (Fragment 1) is 16 seconds, ”Fragmento 2” (Fragment 2) is 23 seconds. They are available for listening (”para escuchar”) on line or off line.

5. Los Horcones. http://www.loshorcones.org.mx/

The homepage of the successful Los Horcones community in Mexico, founded in 1973, based on Skinnerian principles (entire site is available in English and in Spanish).

6. Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl is available on line in Spanish:

http://www.opuslibros.org/PDF/Viktor%20Frankl%20%20El%20Hombre%20En%20Busca%20De%20Sentido.pdf

http://tinyurl.com/pq9d6

7. Sexy Seven? Is sexuality beyond or subsumed by the big five? http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/Group/BussLAB/measures/Schmitt_Buss-2000-JRP-SexySeven.pdf

http://tinyurl.com/mn5aj

Check out this reprint of Schmitt & Buss (2000): Sexy Seven? Sexual Dimensions of Person Description: Beyond or Subsumed by the Big Five? ”Journal of Research in Personality 34”, 141–177.

September 2006

Personality Pedagogy Newsletter  Volume 1, Number 1, September, 2006

Hello and welcome to Personality Pedagogy! This first newsletter will highlight some of my favorite features of the site, since there’s just too much new material to highlight in this format. For example, new topics have been added (e.g. Intelligence, Raymond Cattell, Locus of Control) and the Topics Index page has been re-arranged to list topics by Theorist and by Theory. Since the beginning of Personality Pedagogy this past June, the site has been visited by visitors in 25 different countries and 45 U.S. states.

Please pass this e-mail along to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues. Thank you all for your feedback. I hope that you continue to find the site useful to your teaching!

Cheers,
Marianne

1. What is a Wiki?  How can I contribute?

According to Wikipedia: “A wiki  is a type of website that allows visitors to easily add, remove, or otherwise edit and change some available content, sometimes without the need for registration. This ease of interaction and operation makes a wiki an effective tool for collaborative authoring…(“Wiki wiki” means “quick” or “hurry” in Hawai’ian).”

My goal for Personality Pedagogy is that in the next few months visitors will be able to add their own comments and materials directly in true Wiki style. For right now, however, you are welcome to contribute your own ideas, links, examples, teaching material (especially exercises and assignments) directly to me at miserandino@arcadia.edu and I will post them with your name and affiliation.

I am also looking for people willing to serve as reviewers and editors so that we can post materials that have been peer-reviewed for our site.

2. How will this work?

For now, the only page where visitors can contribute directly is the Karen Horney’s Three Neurotic Personality Styles table (under Examples and Illustrations):

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu/pmwiki/pmwiki.php?n=Examples.ThreeNeuroticPersonalityStyles.

You can add your own examples to the table by following the directions on that page. Be brave and try it out! Don’t worry if you make a mistake you can always click “cancel” instead of “save” or I can edit it later for you.

3. My favorite features:

My very favorite feature is the search feature on the site. You can search the entire site by entering a keyword into the box on the left under the masks logo. I don’t know about you, but I can’t stand sites that claim they have a search engine, but then you can’t find something which you know his there. I promise you that this search engine really works! Try it, but putting in a topic or a name.

My second favorite feature is our Tests, Measurements and Scales page. Did you know that Personality Pedagogy has the largest collection on the Internet of links to research scales? Check it out at:

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu/pmwiki/pmwiki.php?n=Content.Tests

4. My favorite links:

Don’t Marry a Career Woman.

Michael Noer set off a controversy with his essay “Don’t Marry Career Women” in ”Forbes Magazine” on August 22, 2006. On August 23, ”Forbes” pulled the original article and re-posted it:

http://www.forbes.com/home/2006/08/23/Marriage-Careers-Divorce_cx_mn_land.html?boxes=popslide&boxes=custom

along side a rebuttal by Elizabeth Corcoran “Don’t Marry A Lazy Man”. Both writers cite social science research to support their arguments. Many have made further comments on the topic, but there is plenty left for students to debate. Particularly contentious was the infamous slide show “Nine Reasons to Steer Clear of Career Women” You can read the original text of the slide show here:

http://silveraspen.livejournal.com/141315.html

and see the exact references for the research cited by Noir in the article. The original photos have been remixed into various parodies, for example:

http://www.gawker.com/news/forbes/gawker-cliffsnotes-dont-marry-career-women-196165.php

but the original slide show as it appeared does not exist anymore. However, you can get the idea for yourself by using these two links. Note: as this story develops these links may no longer be up to date.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6100673231231319089

Skidmore senior Chris Ladd created this 32 minute film about the search for identity. From the website: ””i” is a short documentary with a simple question as its premise: Who am I? Who is anybody? What is identity? To find out, ‘i’ looks to psychology, to philosophy, to friends, and a professional psychic, and comes to a conclusion that shakes the film’s premise to its core.” Along the way the film summarizes Freud, projective testing, Jung, objective testing, the MBTI, the MMPI, criterion keying, and existentialism.

http://www.socialpsychology.org/ptexts.htm

The Social Psychology Network maintains a list of textbooks for personality psychology along with links to publishers and examination copy request forms.

Videos of Freud, Jung, Skinner, Frankl

http://teaching.berkeley.edu/bgd/teaching.html

Davis, B. G. (1993). Tools for Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Chapters of this book by Barbara Gross Davis of the University of California, Berkeley is available online (the full text version is available from computers connected to the UC Berkeley network).  According to the website:”A compendium of classroom-tested strategies and suggestions designed to improve the teaching practices of all college instructors, including beginning, mid-career, and senior faculty members. The book describes 49 teaching tools that cover both traditional practical tasks–writing a course syllabus, delivering an effective lecture–as well as newer, broader concerns such as responding to diversity on campus and coping with budget constraints.”

http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/medicine/pavlov/index.html

The Nobel Prize Organization hosts an informative web site on Nobel Prize winners which includes educational games. Since Ivan Petrovich Pavlov won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1904, the site has a game to illustrate principles of classical conditioning. Note: if you find the graphics too simplistic, stick around until the end for the theoretical explanation.

http://pages.britishlibrary.net/charles.darwin3/expression/expression_intro.htm

The British Library has placed much of Charles Darwin’s writings on the web including this classic paper ”The expression of the emotions in man and animals”, London: John Murray, (1872), organized by chapter and including the original illustrations.

New format of topics

5. Thanks to…

Dimitrios Diamantaras for inspiration, support, wiki help, and dinners out, Eric McCloy and the IT staff at Arcadia University for getting the site up and keeping it running, Norah Peters Shultz, Dean of Undergraduate Studies and Faculty Development at Arcadia University for a faculty development grant in support of this page, Jonathan Mueller of Teaching Social Psychology Newsletter and website (http://jonathan.mueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/crow/) for helpful suggestions in starting this project, William Revele for his suggestions, and my fellow colleagues out there who graciously allowed me to add their materials and ideas to this site.

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