Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 4, December 2015

December 17, 2015

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Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,256  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Just a quick update with some links for this month. We know that some of you are finishing up a semester while others are planning the semester ahead, while others are just carrying on in the New Year!

To all of you, we wish you a peaceful holiday season and all the best in 2016!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Just two questions predict how well a pilot will handle an emergency
“A new study reports that, more than relevant facts such as age and years of experience, pilots’ answers to two simple questions can more accurately forecast how they will respond to a stressful situation.” These questions help to determine whether the pilot views the situation as a challenge or as a threat. Published in “Anxiety, Stress, & Coping” and summarized here for BPS Research Digest, July 7, 2015.

3. Your personality can invite loneliness, and loneliness can shape your personality
According to new research, “it appears our personality affects the likelihood that we’ll become more lonely (and feel less well) as we get older, but also that being lonely (and feeling less healthy) shapes our personality, potentially setting up a vicious circle of isolation”. Published in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for BPS Research Digest, July 21, 2015.

4. Is Your Brain Male or Female?
Writer Veronica Pamoukaghlian reviews neuroscience investigating possible gender differences in brain form and function. Posted June 6, 2015.

5. Why You Should Be True to Yourself
New research by Maryam Kouchaki and her colleagues finds that feeling inauthentic is related to what it means to be a moral person. Published in Psychological Science and summarized here for PsyBlog, June 11, 2015.

6. How To Be Content When Your Life Feels Out of Control
According to new research “In the survey of over 500 people, the researchers found that both primary and secondary control were linked to positive emotions. Only primary control, though, was linked to negative emotions.” Published in “Social Psychological and Personality Science” and summarized here for PsyBlog,June 8, 2015.

7. This personality trait may get you hired — but it won’t necessarily get you promoted
While agreeable people are well-liked by their colleagues and being cooperative, flexible, tolerant, and forgiving can help you land a job, this trait may not help one advance their career. From “Business Insider”, June 4, 2015.

8. Favorite Link Revisited: Chimpanzees’ Personas Seem More Complex Than People’s
Using the same techniques as the early (human) trait theorists did, Hani Freeman and her colleagues found evidence that chimpanzee personality consists of 6 dimensions. These include extroversion, agreeableness and openness, shared by humans, but also reactivity (related to the human trait of neuroticism, perhaps?), dominance and methodicalness which are not. Their research was published in the American Journal of Primatology and summarized here in The Economist, June 15, 2013.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 3, November 2015

November 29, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,251  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you hear a certain presidential hopeful’s remarks implying that psychology majors at not qualified to do anything but work in fast food? Well, Drew Appleby has compiled a list of some 280 careers that psychology majors can prepare to enter including about 110 where only a BA is necessary. He has compiled an online resource for students and faculty members which we feature below.

Special thanks goes out this month to Mark Mitchell who has graciously allowed us to feature his Power Point program to help students use flashcards to learn, remember, and understand concepts. He just updated this resource — just in time for finals — so check out the link below.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. An Online Career-Exploration Resource for Psychology Majors (2015)
This resource has two parts. The first (for faculty) explains the resource, suggests ways to use the resource to promote student success, and contains lists of printed and online sources to aid faculty in their career-advising activities.  The second (for students) consists of a list of 280 careers (organized into 15 broad occupational categories) that psychology majors can prepare to enter.  More than 2,000 internet sites are provided that students can use to explore these careers.

3. What is Industrial/Organizational Psychology?
Psychology.org provides this informative page on what I/O psychology is, how to become one, what a typical day is like for an I/O psychologist, and a list of resources.

4. Flashcards: Beyond Rote Memorization: New Ways to Use Flashcards to Learn, Remember, and Understand Concepts (2015)
Students often use flashcards, but they often do not use them effectively. This PowerPoint, created by Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania, shows students how to make and study flashcards effectively. Instructors can use this PowerPoint as a presentation or they can assign it to students as a tutorial. If used as a tutorial, professors can have students print out a results page that will tell professors how long students spent on the tutorial and how well they did on a quiz over the tutorial. Requires PowerPoint 2010 or later and, when prompted, users should choose to enable macros.

5. Women’s Testosterone Levels Rise Even When They Just Act Like They Have Power
According to new research by Sari M. van Anders, Jeffrey Steiger, and Katherine L. Goldey and published this month in PNAS suggests that “women who play-acted scenarios that gave them power over someone else showed an increase in testosterone production”. From Slate.com, October 26, 2015.

6. Favorite Link Revisited: Careers in Psychology: Web Resources for Psychology Majors
Features over 20 links to resources for psychology majors doing career planning or applying to graduate schools.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 11, Number 2, October 2015

October 29, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-seventh Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,240  other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, we bring you some fascinating links from many areas of personality, including how there may be an unintended side effect of deep brain stimulation (used to treat Parkinson’s and other diseases): personality change. Also, the “Science of Relationships” website has a fascinating psychoanalysis of sorts of Elsa and Anna, the sisters from the movie “Frozen”, suggesting that their rocky relationship may have been due to differing attachment styles. Finally, Dan Ariely, who’s psychoeconomic research always makes us think, presents a short video on how to encourage motivation at work. And at this point in the semester, who couldn’t use a little more motivation? If you’re in need of a smile, then check out the monkey selfies found under our Favorite Link Revisited.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Anxious-Avoidant Duos: Walking on Thin Ice in Relationships and Physical Health

Writing for “Science of Relationships”, Jena Lempke describes how Disney’s hit movie “Frozen” depicts how varying preferences for closeness in people with different attachments styles can lead to relationship problems. She describes how the friction between the sisters Elsa (with her avoidant attachment style) and Anna (with her anxious attachment style) was caused by their different attachment styles.

3. Personality Changes After Deep Brain Stimulation

“Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a well-known and accepted treatment for neurological and psychiatric diseases. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), DBS clearly improves patients’ symptoms, functionality and quality of life in the long run. Nevertheless, it seems that the electrodes do not have motor-specific functions. DBS influences mental states and personality and in some cases it can even lead to a “new personality”” by increasing impulsivity. From “Brain Blogger”, October 29, 2015.

4. What Pushes Us To Work Hard — Even When We Don’t Have To?

“Behavioral economist Dan Ariely says we work hard not because we have to, but because we want to. He examines the intrinsic values we need to feel motivated to work” in this TED talk from NPR, October 2, 2015. (runs 14 minutes and 52 seconds)

5. Erich Fromm on the Art of Loving and What Is Keeping Us from Its Mastery

“There is hardly any activity, any enterprise, which is started with such tremendous hopes and expectations, and yet, which fails so regularly, as love.” Read about Erich Fromm’s book “The Art of Loving” in this essay by Maria Popova for “BrainPickings”, October 29, 2015.

6. This Personality Trait Predicts Your Tendency to Lie and Cheat

“Researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau in Germany say that a sixth personality trait,” called honesty-humility, “can predict one type of behavior that none” of the usual five-factors can: dishonesty. From “Business Insider”, June 15, 2015.

7. Tested: Whether You Can Change Your Personality At Will

According to research by Hudson and Fraley (2015) and published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”, “people may be able to change their self-reported personality traits through volitional means, and represent a first step toward understanding the processes that enable people to do so.” This summary from “PsyBlog”, June 16, 2015.

8. What the Textbooks Don’t Tell You About Psychology’s Most Famous Case Study

“If you turn to many of the leading introductory psychology textbooks (American ones, at least), you’ll find the wrong answer, or a misleading account. Richard Griggs, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Florida, has just analysed the content of 23 contemporary textbooks (either released or updated within the last couple of years), and he finds most of them contain distortions, omissions and inaccuracies” when it comes to describing the life of Phineas Gage. British Psychological Society “Research Digest”, June 30, 2015.

9. What Holocaust Survivors Can Teach Us About Gratitude

Neuroscientists have gained new insights into how gratitude operates in the brain. Glenn Fox and his colleagues had participants read testimonies of Holocaust survivors while their brains were being scanned. They discovered that areas activated during moments of gratitude include processing reward, fairness, moral cognition, and self-reference. Published in the journal “Frontiers in Psychology”, and summarized here for “PsyBlog”, October 21, 2015.

10. Should We Genetically Screen Four-Year-Olds?

Would true equality in education mean testing children’s genetics at the age of four, so that any learning difficulties revealed can be accommodated right from the start of primary education? Hear Robert Plomin on the role genetics play in children’s success. From “The Guardian”, July 17, 2015. (audio interview; runs 42 minutes and 46 seconds).

11. Only When I Laugh: The Science of Laughter

Laughter overrides our usual vocal and physical control to make sounds we never normally hear in any other context. Read all about this intriguing response in “The Guardian”, July 6, 2015.

12. Favorite Link Revisited: Monkey Selfie

Monkey Hijacks Photographer’s Camera and Shots Self-Portraits While filming macaque monkeys in an Indonesian national park, photographer David Slater lost his camera to one of his subjects. The resulting self-portraits are both comical and all too human and illustrate nicely the question of self-recognition as a uniquely human capacity.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 10, Number 1, September 2015

September 30, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,221 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Did you know that September 18 was “Jeans for Genes Day”, a campaign by this British charity to raise awareness of genetic disorders? As part of their educational campaign, they started a web page loaded with information and resources for teachers about genetics and genetic disorders. To celebrate with them, check out the links below and our Favorite Link Revisited.

Presidential hopefuls are often subject to name calling in the press, but have you heard about Donald Trump as “Narrcissist-in-Chief”? A touch of narcissism may actually be a helpful trait for the U.S. President…or at least a presidential hopeful according to research reviewed in the New York Times (see link below).

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Raising Awareness of Genetic Disorders: Jeans for Genes Day

As part of their mission, Jeans for Genes Day, which raises awareness of genetic disorders and money for people with genetic disorders, created “five minute films that are narrated by children who are either affected by a genetic disorder themselves or have an affected sibling. Each film is accompanied by a teacher fact sheet and a number of resources that can be used in the classroom.”

3. Six creative ways to teach genetics

A selection of creative ways to help students of all ages and abilities understand genes and genetic disorders. From “The Guardian”, September 7, 2015.

4. Your Family Health History: A DNA Day Activity

This PDF describes how to create a family tree or pedigree documenting medical conditions which may run in families, but you can easily adapt the activity to focus on personality traits.

5. Science says these 2 personality traits predict whether you’ll be a successful leader

“Every organization, from Apple and Google to the US government, demands different skills and personal qualities in its leadership. But research suggests there are two traits that are common to the majority of successful leaders: extroversion and conscientiousness”. According to a meta-analysis by Timothy Judge and colleagues as summarized here for “Business Insider”, July 14, 2015.

6. What does your selfie reveal about your personality?

According to research by Lin Qiu and colleagues published in “Computers in Human Behaviour” “[P]eople who scored higher in agreeableness (similar to friendliness) were more likely to show positive emotion in their selfies and to hold the camera in a lower position; high-scorers on conscientiousness were less likely to reveal a private location in the background (presumably because of concerns about privacy); people who scored higher in neuroticism (suggestive of emotional instability) were more likely to pull a duck face; and finally, higher scores in openness-to-experience correlated with showing more positive emotion. Levels of extraversion were not correlated with any of the cues, perhaps because so many people attempt to appear outgoing in their selfies.” From “BPS Research Digest”, August 11, 2015.

7. This personality test can signal if you have selfish or manipulative tendencies

“Do you deceive other people for your own benefit, see others as weak and untrustworthy, and ignore moral codes? If so, you may be” a high Mach according to this summary presented in “Business Insider”, August 27, 2015.

8. Machiavellianism Scale

This is an interactive version of the MACH-IV test of Machiavellianism.

9. The Narcissist in Chief

Writing for the “New York Times”, Gerard DuBois summarizes research on the kind of leaders narcissists make with an eye toward evaluating presidential candidates.

10. Research Tool Demonstrates How Your Facebook Likes Reveal Your Personality

Eric Ravenscraft, writing for “LifeHacker”, discusses a tool developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge to analyze your Facebook like to reveal what people can learn about you. This link takes you directly to the tool should you wish to try it out for yourself.

11. How Changeable Is Gender?

Richard A. Friendman, professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College writes about how research in neuroscience suggests that gender identity and how it exists on a continuum in this thought-provoking essay. From “The New York Times”, August 22, 2015.

12. Here’s a Quick Way to Figure Out What You Should Do With Your Life, Based on Your Personality

Check out this colorful flow chart, based on the work of John Holland, which asks a series of questions to help you find your ideal career. From “The Muse”, July 13, 2015.

13. 6 Sample Questions Employers Ask to Assess your Personality

These 6 questions may be questions you are likely to see the next time you apply for a job. From “Business Insider”, July 16, 2015.

14. The Good Habit Which Boosts Self-Control

Research by Pilcher et al. (2015) and published in “Frontiers in Human Neuroscience” finds that good sleep habits like going to bed at the same time every night, can boost attention, improve decision-making, and strengthen the ability to resist impulses. From PsyBlog, July 10, 2015.

15. This Obvious Happiness Strategy Really Does Work, Study Finds

According to research by Catalino et al. from the journal “Emotion”, explicitly trying to feel happier as well as paying too much attention to how happy you feel have both been linked to feeling worse. The secret to happiness appears to be “prioritizing positivity”. From PsyBlog, July 3, 2015.

16. The Personality Trait Linked To The Strongest Immune System

Outgoing, sociable people also have the strongest immune systems according to a study by Vedhara et al. (2014) published in the journal “Psychoneuroendochrinology” and summarized here in PsyBlog, December 14, 2014.

17. The Psychological Secret to Great Exercise Habits

Here’s the secret: “It’s all about making sure there are regular cues which prompt you to automatically exercise”. The catch? These cues are likely to be different for different people. From PsyBlog, July 15, 2015.

18. Take the Narcissism Test and Find Out If You’re ’Normal’

Ames et al. (2006) created a short 16-item test for narcissism which was published in the “Journal of Research in Personality”. You can take an online version of their test here.

19. Is Life’s Happiness Curve Really U-Shaped

Evidence suggests that happiness is likely to increase as we age according to research summarized here in “The Guardian”, June 24, 2015.

20. Why CBT is Falling Out of Favour

What’s going on? “After analysing 70 studies conducted between 1977 and 2014, researchers Tom Johnsen and Oddgeir Friborg concluded that CBT is roughly half as effective in treating depression as it used to be.” Read about their results and possible explanations for this trend in this summary for “The Guardian”, July 3, 2015.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: Teach Genetics

The Genetics Science Learning Center at the University of Utah built this website as a companion to their Learn.Genetics website. Here you will find classroom activities to teach the basics of heritable traits and take-home activities to help students share what they’ve learned with their families. PDFs are available for download including instructions, student worksheets, overhead masters, and answer keys. Some of the material may be too basic for a college class (although the graphics which review the basics of inheritance would make an excellent review), the topics do include Epigenetics, gene therapy, personalized medicine, cloning, and other fairly sophisticated topics. Most of the activities can be modified to fit the needs of your students and the topic of personality.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 12, August 2015

August 12, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,202 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we have been continuing our summer housekeeping. We’ve been busy checking and updating each link on the site. To our dismay, we discovered that some links have disappeared entirely — especially videos (due to copyright infringements) and instructor’s class slides and web pages (probably due to retirement or changing jobs). This serves as a good reminder that any materials you use from the Internet may disappear or move so you should find a way to capture, print, copy, and/or download your favorites so that you can always have access to them.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Pixar’s “Inside Out” is a Surprisingly Accurate Look at Human Psychology —- Here’s What it Gets Right and Wrong.

Applies psychological theory and research to the movie “Inside Out” and describes what aspects of human psychology they got right (e.g., sleep consolidating memories, reframing memories, emotional complexity) what they got sort of right (e.g., core memories, personality islands) and what they just made up (e.g., imagination land). From “Business Insider”, June 23, 2015.

3. This Facial Expression Appears More Trustworthy To Others

According to research by Hehman, Flake, and Freeman (2015) in the “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here for PsyBlog, “A neutral face with a slightly upturned mouth and eyebrows makes people look more trustworthy, a new study finds. [But] the same neutral face with a slightly angry expression is seen as less trustworthy.”

4. This Fascinating TED Talk Shows Why You Have No Idea What Will Make You Happy in 10 Years

In his 2014 TED talk, Harvard social psychologist Daniel Gilbert explains “the end of history illusion” where “people are unable to anticipate just how much they’ll change in the future — even though they can appreciate how much they’ve grown in the past. So, at every age, you think the person you are today is the person you’ll be for the rest of your life.” Runs 6 minutes, 50 seconds.

5. CHIPTS: Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services

CHIPTS maintains this extensive list of links to 203 questionnaires for practitioners and researchers, many of them related to personality including:
Sub-Categories: Attachment, Coping Strategies, Health Efficacy, Life Outcomes, Mental Health, Perceived Vulnerability/Susceptibility, Personal Traits, Quality of Life, Religious/Spiritual, Self-efficacy, Sexual Attitudes, Social and much, much more.

6. College Social Life Can Predict Well-Being at Midlife

It’s well known that being socially connected promotes a person’s overall and psychological health. A new study now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 — and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 — can benefit her well-being later in life.

7. Your Musical Tastes Reflect Your Thinking Style

A study by David Greenberg and colleagues published in PLOS ONE, shows that the way someone thinks – his or her cognitive style – is a better predictor of the songs they’ll like than is their personality type. From Discover Magazine, July 24, 2015.

8. Keeping Up That Positive Feeling: The Science of Savoring Emotions

Savoring a beautiful sunset and the positive emotions associated with it can contribute to improved well-being, according to research. But why and how are some people better than others in keeping the feeling alive? From Science Daily, July 21, 2015.

9. The Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS)

The PANAS is based upon research demonstrating that self-reported mood states can be effectively classified on two dimensions. Each PANAS scale comprises ten specific mood-related adjectives rated on five-point scales of frequency over a two-week period.

10. State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)

The STAI is a validated 20 item self report assessment device which includes separate measures of state and trait anxiety. Recommended for studying anxiety in research and clinical settings.

11. Global Attachment: Relationship Scales Questionnaire (RSQ)

The RSQ is a 30-item questionnaire requiring participants to rate, on a 7-point scale, the extent to which each statement describes their characteristic style in close relationships (1 = not at all like me, 7 = very much like me). Items are summed to create two subscales, corresponding to the dimensions of avoidance and anxiety. Developed by Griffin, D., & Bartholomew, K. (1994).

12. Janis Self-Esteem Scale

Jannis, I. L., & Field, P. B. (1959). The Jannis and Field personality questionnaire. In C. I. Hovland & I. L. Jannis (Eds), Personality and persuasibility (pp. 300). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

13. The Pros and Cons of Being a Night Owl Instead of a Morning Person

While some research has found that early birds tend to have more positive social traits, such as optimism, night owls may have their own distinct advantages as well. From “Business Insider”, June 23, 2015.

14. Sexual Attitudes

Links to 8 measures of sexual attitudes including attitudes towards abstinence, sexual risks scale, sexual self-concept questionnaire and more.

15. How To Measure Circadian Rhythms in Humans

From Wirz-Justice, A. (2007). How to measure circadian rhythms in humans. Medicographia, 29(1), 84-90. Provides an overview of the topic with vivid examples and graphics. Opens in PDF.

16. How to Stop Procrastinating in 2 Easy Steps

Describes the work of Katy Milkman on “temptation bundling” in which behaviors we should do but procrastinate on are bundled with activities we’re tempted to do. Together, people are better able to exert their self-control to do what must be done and procrastinate less.

17. Researchers Discovered a Psychological Trick That Will Help You Stop Procrastinating
http://www.businessinsider.com/psychological-trick-to-stop-procrastinating-2015-7

“Psychologists have figured out a ridiculously easy trick to combat your tendency to put things off: Break them up into smaller pieces. The idea is that you’ll get a thrill out of checking those individual items off your to-do list and, before you know it, you’ll have completed the whole project.” From “Business Insider”, July 8, 2015.

18. College Social Life Can Predict Well-being at Midlife

It’s well known that being socially connected promotes a person’s overall and psychological health. A new study now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 — and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 — can benefit her well-being later in life. From “ScienceDaily”, July 23, 2015.

19. Research Suggests There are 4 Types of Introverts — Find Out Which Best Describes You

According to new research, there are four different kinds of introversion: social, thinking, anxious, and restrained. From “Business Insider”, July 1, 2015.

20. Exploring Bioethics

The National Institutes of Health provide this Curriculum Supplement on Exploring Bioethics for grades 9-12: “Students use a new model for ethical inquiry to develop thoughtful positions on complex bioethical issues. The supplement’s six modules each contain three 45-minute class periods of lessons on a specific issue.” Includes modules on balancing individual and community claims, allocating scarce resources, weighing benefits and harms of genetic testing, research ethics, and human responsibilities toward animals.

21. Favorite Link Revisited: How to Search APA’s Research Databases

Anne Breitenbach, APA Publications & Databases, put together this primer describing the host of free teaching tools for psychology research that are perfect for undergraduate students, [including] video tutorials, training webinars and reference guides that will help students learn how to efficiently search scholarly research databases, [and] website materials, podcasts and topic guides that will help them explore psychology and human behavior.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 11, July 2015

July 22, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,179 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you no doubt have heard of this summer’s hit movie “Inside Out”. This charming movie depicts life inside the head of 11-year old Riley focusing on her emotions personified by different characters and grounded in psychological theory and research.

Turns out, social-personality psychologist and emotion researcher Dacher Keltner is long time friends with Pixar director Pete Docter. The two became intrigued by the mysterious ways of emotions in their own kids (according to link #3 below). Keltner explains that pre-teens often experience a drop in happiness and a rise in anxiety. “It’s like the world crashes down on them,” Keltner said. The movie traces that shift, with tear-inducing as well as laugh-inducing effects.

Keltner was joined by facial expressions expert psychologist Paul Ekman in working with the Pixar team to portray childhood emotions, memory and character development in a scientifically sound way. The result speaks for itself. We here at Personality Pedagogy urge you to take you and your little friends to see this family-friendly movie, if you haven’t already done so.

Also new this month, it was announced that work has begun on a new film depicting Viktor Frankl’s account of his experience during the Holocaust. Frankl’s book “Man’s Search for Meaning” is being adapted by screenwriter Adam Gibgot. Gibgot explains, “The movie is about the best and worst of humanity, but how out of the worst the best can emerge.”

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

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2. Science of Sadness And Joy: ‘Inside Out’ Gets Childhood Emotions Right
The hit of the summer of 2015, “Inside Out”, depicts life for an 11-year old girl. Much of the film takes place inside her mind, in a control center staffed by five emotions personified: Joy, Sadness, Fear, and Disgust. Read about the science behind the movie and the contributions of psychologists Dacher Keltner and Paul Ekman who were consultants to the film.

3. ’Inside Out’ Movie Reflects the Realities and Fantasies of Neuroscience
Kids and the general public may be learning about how the brain and emotions work from an unlikely source: the hit movie “Inside Out” (2015). This article takes a look at the science behind the movie.

4. The Harry Potter Personality Test
According to a study published in the journal “Personality and Individual Differences” a person’s preferred Hogwart’s house from the fictional Harry Potter series may be related to their personality traits.

5. What it Means to Come Out in the Transgender Community
Inspired by the recent debut of Caitlyn Jenner on the June 2015 cover of “Vanity Fair” magazine, “Time” ran this article explaining that the process of coming out as a transgendered person is not linear; it varies from person to person. From “Time”, June 2, 2015.

6. Epigenetics and Its Major Influence on Life
In this essay James D. Baird explains how the science of epigenetics is finding that genes aren’t our destiny despite popular thinking. “Brain Blogger”, June 11, 2015.

7. Group Memberships Boost Self-Esteem More Than Friends Alone
“Belonging to multiple groups that are important to you boosts self-esteem much more than having friends alone” according to research published in PLOS ONE and summarized here for “ScienceDaily”, June, 2015.

8. Abraham Maslow: Father of Modern Management
Presents an overview of Maslow’s theories including the hierarchy of needs, self-actualization, theory Z, peak experiences; a summary of his books; quotes; and other resources.

9. Muppet Wiki: Walter Mischel
Muppet Wiki is a collaborative encyclopedia for everything related to Jim Henson, Sesame Street, The Muppet Show, and The Muppets Studio. It includes this page on Walter Mischel and features the musical sketch “Good Things Come to Those Who Wait” illustrating the concept of delay of gratification.

10. Awaken: Fritz Perls
Presents an overview of Perls’ life and theory including links to articles and videos.

11. Fritz Perls Treats People With Demons
The video includes Fritz Perls treating a man with a psychosis and a women with grief from parent issues. (Runs 31 minutes, 29 seconds).

12. Fritz Perls: Spiritual Training
Fritz Perls speaks about how to use your spiritual energy. (Runs 1 minute 18 seconds.)

13. Fritz Perls Gestalt Segment
Fritz Perls recites the Gestalt prayer. (Runs 8 minutes 16 seconds.)

14. Fritz Perls on Gestalt Therapy
Fritz Perls speaks to students about Gestalt therapy, the self and spirit. (Runs 6 minutes 49 seconds.)

15. Fritz Perls Workshop
Excerpt from a Fritz Perls workshop. (Runs 1 minute 37 seconds.)

16. Frederick Perls: A Son’s Reflections
From the webpage: “In celebration of the centennial of the birth of Frederick Perls, The Gestalt Journal invited his son Stephen, to address our Fifteenth Annual Conference on the Theory and Practice of Gestalt Therapy. Dr. Perls delivered this talk on the morning of April 23, 1993, at the Hotel du Parc in Montreal.”

17. The Gestalt Therapy Network
Includes digital forums for practitioners, students, and interested others; a directory of practitioners; and a comprehensive bibliography.

18. Night Owl or Morning Lark?
Should you pull an all-nighter or wake up early to study? This blog post reviews the evidence and concludes that it all depends on your chronotype.

19. The Perils of Novelty Seeking
World-class endurance athlete, coach, author, and political activist Christopher Bergland reviews the concept of Novelty Seeking, how it relates to the Big Five, and how sometimes the need for novelty may lead to extreme sports, ultra-endurance, and ultimately life-threatening experiences.

20. Desperately Seeking Sensation: Fear, Reward, and the Human Need for Novelty
“Sensation-seeking, the tendency to seek out novel experiences, is a general personality trait that has been extensively studied in psychological research, but neuroscience is just beginning to take aim at it.”

21. Novelty and the Brain: Why New Things Make Us Feel So Good
“We all like shiny new things, whether it’s a new gadget, new city, or new job. In fact, our brains are made to be attracted to novelty—and it turns out that it could actually improve our memory and learning capacity. The team at social sharing app Buffer explains how.” From LifeHacker, May 21, 2013.

22. Better Get to Work: Procrastination May Harm Heart Health
New evidence suggests that chronic procrastinators may be more vulnerable to serious health conditions like cardiovascular disease and hypertension. From the Association for Psychological Science, May 5, 2015.

23. Attachment Training
Alan Sroufe and June Sroufe provide information about attachment in the John Bowlby-Mary Ainsworth tradition and training in the assessment of attachment across the lifespan along with a primer on attachment theory, a list of suggested basic readings, and more.

24. An Attachment Primer: Fundamentals of Attachment Theory
Presents a brief overview of attachment theory.

25. Favorite Link Revisited: The British Museum of Science on Emotions
The British National Museum of Science has an extensive interactive web site. This online exhibit on recognizing emotions, emotions and the brain, faking emotional expression, animal emotions, and more.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 10, June 2015

June 21, 2015

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,161 other interesting links related to personality psychology, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This big news this month is that Personality Pedagogy has a new look: photos! If you browse any of our pages, you will notice the content is there but the layout is more aesthetically pleasing, incorporating many photos and illustrations. Also, we are now a mobile friendly site, meaning that it is easier than ever to look up content on the fly when you away from your computer. We will continue updating and repairing broken links over the summer and in the process finding new sites to add as you can see by this packed newsletter.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at https://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter
http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Using OK Cupid to Teach Research Methods

Co-founder Christian Rudder talks about how OK Cupid collects and uses data. Their methods raise important questions about research including: “What are different kinds of social science data? How can/should we manipulate respondents to get it? What does it look like? How can it be used to answer questions? Or, how can we understand the important difference between having the data and doing an interpretation of it?”

3. Positive Reinforcement – The Big Bang Theory

Sheldon uses chocolate to shape Penny’s behavior. Later, Sheldon and Leonard have a discussion of conditioning, which, despite some misuse of terms, may still spark discussion in your class.

4. Nature v Nurture: Research Shows It’s Both

A meta-analysis of almost every twin study conducted from across the world shows that the average variation for human traits and diseases is 49% genetic and 51% due to environmental factors. This, according to research published in the journal Nature Genetics and summarized here. Published May 15, 2015.

5. On The California Shore, Sizing Up Female Marines’ Combat Readiness

The Pentagon has decreed that the Marines must open combat roles for women by 2016 unless they can show a good reason not to. The Marine Corps has teamed up with the University of Pittsburgh to scientifically measure skills, strength, and endurance in order to establish valid and reliable gender-neutral standards.

6. How 4th Grade Predicts Your Future

“A growing body of psychological research is revealing a few remarkable connections between our childhood experiences with peers and our lives in adulthood.” Read about personality coherence of adult personality in kids who were rejected, controversial, neglected, and accepted as fourth graders. From “Psychology Today”, June 2015.

7. James Randi Educational Foundation

“James Randi has an international reputation as a magician and escape artist, but today he is best known as the world’s most tireless investigator and demystifier of paranormal and pseudoscientific claims.” Towards this end, his website features educational modules on “How to Think About Dubious Claims”, “Astrology: Superstition or Science?”, “Do you have ESP?” and more.

8. A Key Researcher Says “Grit” isn’t Ready for High-Stakes Measures

Grit, the “ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal”, has been embraced by educators, the media. But according to researcher Angela Duckworth, “the enthusiasm is getting ahead of the science”. From NPR, May 13, 2015.

9. This Day in Jewish History: A Psychoanalyst Who Couldn’t Understand War is Born

“March 23, 1900 is the birthdate of the Jewish scholar and psychoanalyst Erich Fromm, who gave up the religious obligations of the Orthodox Judaism of his youth for the study of the psychology of love – and war, which, to his mind, made very little rational sense.” From “Haaretz”, March 23, 2015.

10. Allport

A whiteboard video animation on the life of Gordon Allport. Runs 2 minutes and 19 seconds.

11. Gordon Allport Wiki

Includes pages on Allport’s early life, trait theory, and his visit with Freud.

12. Social Psychology Then and Now

Writing for the APS Observer, Anthony G. Greenwald describes the life and work of Gordon Allport including his work related to attitudes, IAT, prejudice, values, and more. From January 2013.

13. A Profile of Aaron Beck

“PsychCentral” presents this brief profile of Aaron Beck.

14. The Doctor is IN

“The American Scholar” presents this overview of the life, work, and theories of Aaron Beck. Posted September 2009.

15. Whether You’re a Lark or a Night Owl, Your Sleeping Habits Say Volumes About Your Health.

A brief summary of the research on morning larks and night owls and how they differ in their disposition, breakfast habits, alarm clock use, vulnerability to jet lag, age, and more. From April 2013.

16. Centre For Personal Construct Psychology

The University of Hertfordshire maintains this site related to personal construct psychology (PCP). Features background information on PCP, George Kelly, the repertory grid, courses and services, literature and library, and more.

17. Kelly (1978): Confusion and the Clock

The last work of George Kelly where he discusses the idea of death. Originally published as Kelly, G.A. (1978) Confusion and the Clock In Fransella, F. (Ed.) Personal Construct Psychology. Academic Press.

18. Kelly (1969): The Threat of Aggression

Kelly, G. A. (1969). The threat of aggression. In B. Maher (Ed.), Clinical Psychology and Personality: The Selected Papers of George Kelly (pp. 281-288). London, UK: Wiley.

19. The Duckworth Lab

The research lab of Angela Duckworth at the University of Pennsylvania: “Our lab focuses on two traits that predict achievement: grit and self-control. Grit is the tendency to sustain interest in and effort toward very long-term goals (Duckworth et al., 2007). Self-control is the voluntary regulation of behavioral, emotional, and attentional impulses in the presence of momentarily gratifying temptations or diversions (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005; Duckworth & Steinberg, 2015).”

20. Favorite Link Revisited: The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook

The Pavlovian Response to Seeing Birthday Announcements on Facebook Mike Masnick discusses an “experiment” conducted by David Plotz of Slate magazine. Plotz noted that well-wishers responded automatically when they saw that a friend was having a birthday on Facebook.