Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 9, Number 1, September 2014

September 11, 2014

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Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,061 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Like us, we’re sure many of you are in the full swing of a new semester and a new school year. We’ll keep this newsletter short and sweet so you can go back to preparing your classes.

Special thanks go out this month to Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania who put together a PowerPoint presentation to help students use flashcards more effectively as a study tool. Their presentation is based on (a) what psychologists know about concept formation and (b) what psychologist know about memory. You can download via the link below. We thank them for giving Personality Pedagogy the opportunity to publish their presentation. Check it out!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at http://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Beyond Rote Memorization: New Ways to Use Flashcards to Learn, Remember, and Understand Concepts

Students often use flashcards, but they often do not use them effectively. This Powerpoint, created by Mark Mitchell and Janina Jolley of Clarion University of Pennsylvania, shows students how to make and study flashcards effectively. Instructors can use this Powerpoint as a presentation or they can assign it to students as a tutorial. If used as a tutorial, professors can have students print out a results page that will tell professors how long students spent on the tutorial and how well they did on a quiz over the tutorial. Requires PowerPoint 2010 or later and, when prompted, users should choose to enable macros.

3. Freud’s City, From Couch to Cafes

Stephen Heyman, writing for ‘’The New York Times’’ researched and visited many of Freud’s favorite haunts in a city which he both loved and hated. From the cafe where the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society met to Leopoldstadt, the Jewish quarter in Freud’s day, to a medical history museum and Schloss Bellevue where Freud interpreted his first dream, Heyman describes places in Vienna where one can go to appreciate the import and life of Sigmund Freud.

4. The Mistake Everybody Makes With Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence isn’t just “being nice to people” nor is it unequivocally a good thing. This info graphic vividly illustrates what emotional intelligence is . . . and isn’t. From ”Business Insider”, August 18, 2014.

5. What Your Facebook Photos Say About Your Personality

According to research by Azar Eftekhar and colleagues, extroverts and people high in Neuroticism upload significant numbers of photos. However Extroverts tend to change their profile cover photos while people high in Neuroticism upload more photos per album. From ‘’Live Science’’, August 5, 2014.

6. The Best Jobs For Every Personality Type

This info graphic presents the five best jobs for each type of personality according to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Personality Test. From ”Business Insider”, September 4, 2014.

7. Can Fiction Stories Make Us More Empathetic?

‘’Exposure to narrative fiction may improve our ability to understand what other people are thinking or feeling, a researcher reports. Many stories are about people — their mental states, their relationships. The researcher explains that we understand stories using basic cognitive functions, and there is not a special module in the brain that allows us to do this. Understanding stories is similar to the way we understand the real world.’’ From ‘’Science Daily’’, August 11, 2014.

8. 4 Tips For Becoming Emotionally Resilient

Emotional resilience can be learned and this article presents 4 ways to help develop it. From ‘’Psych Central’’, September 11, 2014.

9. Epigenetics: Genes, Environment and The Generation Game
According to this article from ‘’The Guardian’’, September 6, 2014, ‘’New research claims that environmental factors affect not just an individual’s genes but those of their offspring too. Diabetes, obesity – even certain phobias – may all be influenced by the behaviour of our forebears’’.

10. How Trauma Can Help You Grow

Post-traumatic growth can help help survivors of traumatic events cope with their pain and recover from traumatic events. From ‘’U.S. News & World Report’’, September 8, 2014.

11. Reacting to Personal Setbacks: Do You Bounce Back or Give Up?

‘’Sometimes when people get upsetting news – such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review – they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened’’ according to new research mapping brain activity using fMRI scans published in the journal ‘’Neuron’’ and summarized here in ‘’Science Daily’’, September 4, 3014.

12. Science Explains Why Comedies Are Funnier When You See Them in a Crowded Theater

Research published in the journal ‘’Emotion’’ suggests that group attention intensifies emotions relative to attending alone. From ‘’Discover Magazine’’, September 2, 2014.

13. Favorite Link Revisited: The Science of Compassion and Resilience

Psychologist David DeSteno examines the science of compassion and resilience exploring new ideas for leveraging the mechanisms of the mind that enable them according to Maria Popova for Brain Pickings, October 22, 2012. Runs 18 minutes, 28 seconds.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 12, August 2014

August 18, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,046 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month would be a good time to get moving on your upcoming fall classes. But if you are still in summer mode, then check out our links on procrastination below.

If, however, you are looking for inspiration for your classes including activities, textbooks, syllabi, and even ideas for first-day-of-class ice breakers, then check out The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, our featured Favorite Link Revisited this month brought to you by The Society for the Teaching of Psychology.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at http://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2.Getting Over Procrastination

Piers Steel, a researcher whose specialty is procrastination, explains how procrastination has been a problem since recorded time leading to lessened well-being, worse health, and lower salaries. So, why do we do it and how can we stop it? Steel shares some of his research findings in this piece by Maria Konnikova for “The New Yorker”, July 22, 2014.

3. Procrastination and Science

What do the Dalai Lama, Victor Hugo, St. Augstine and Margaret Atwood have in common? They are all procrastinators according to researchers Piers Steel, Rosa Hendijani and Chris Morin of the University of Calgary. They put together this web page to study procrastination and to link it to other aspects of personality. Includes links to the downside and the upside of procrastination, famous procrastinators, quotes about procrastination, personality tests, online polls, strategies to counter procrastination, and a summary of their latest research. Posted August 2014.

4. Procrastination Survey

You can sign up here to take the procrastination survey of researchers Piers Steel, Rosa Hendijani and Chris Morin of the University of Calgary and to participate in their ongoing research on procrastination.

5. Sometimes Early Birds Are Too Early

From the article: “Since the advent of the deadline, procrastinators have suffered society’s barbs for putting off until later what needs doing now. But it turns out that many people appear to be finishing things sooner than they need to get them done. They are “precrastinators,” researchers say. “ From “The New York Times”, July 19, 2014.

6. How Your “Locus of Control” Drives Your Success (and Stress)

Though generally people with an internal locus of control fare better in life, an extreme internal orientation can become a problem unless it is tempered by competence, self-efficacy, and opportunity or else people may become neurotic, anxious, and depressed. From “Business Insider”, July 30, 2014.

7. Mathematical Equation to Predict Happiness: Doesn’t Depend on How Well Things Go, But on Whether Things are Better Than Expected

“The happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide has been predicted by an equation developed by researchers at [University College, London], with results showing that moment-to-moment happiness reflects not just how well things are going, but whether things are going better.” From “ScienceDaily”, August 4, 2014.

8. Study Reveals “Unhappiest” Cities in the U.S.

“New research identifies the unhappiest cities in the U.S., but finds that some young people are still willing to relocate to them for a good job opportunity or lower housing prices. The analysis suggests people may be deciding to trade happiness for other gains.” From “ScienceDaily”, July 22, 2014.

9. How Much Does Happiness Cost in Your State?

According to ABC News “In a popular study by psychologist Daniel Kahneman and economist Angus Deaton, it was determined that the “magic income” is $75,000 a year. According to the study, as people earn more money, their day-to-day happiness (or “Emotional Well-Being”) rises.” They put together a map estimating how much it takes in each state to reach this idea level of income. In some states like Utah and Mississippi, it takes less, while in others, New York, Connecticut, and Hawaii, it takes much more. July 18, 2014.

10. How 14 Things That Happened To You In Childhood Shape You As An Adult

From attachment with caretakers to making one’s own decisions, to being spanked as a kid, there is evidence that these experiences from one’s childhood can affect personality in adulthood. From “Business Insider”, July 28, 2014.

11. Why Was Darth Vader So Evil? Blame His Lack of Parental Care, Say Psychologists

“Why was Darth Vader such a bad dude? According to a team of psychologists led by Peter Jonason, it’s down to his lack of parental care: the fact he was separated from his mother at age 9, and his father’s absence. The researchers believe such circumstances can catalyze the emergence of the Dark Triad of personality traits: Machiavellianism, Narcissism and Psychopathy. These traits are usually seen as negative, but Jonason and his colleagues believe they may be an adaptive response to tough early circumstances that signal to a child “life is bad”.” From “BPS Research Digest”, August 5, 2014.

12. How to Manage Both Extroverts and Introverts

Introverts and extroverts both bring assets to the workplace. Understanding what they are and how to manage them can help managers run a more productive and happy workplace. From “Business Insider”, July 10, 2014.

13. This Personality Trait Is The Most Important Driver Of Creative Achievement

According to research, the factor of Openness and its four constituent factors of explicit cognitive ability, intellectual engagement, affective engagement, and aesthetic engagement are related to creative work. From “Business Insider”, July 7, 2014.

14. One Simple Question Can Determine if You’re A Narcissist

According to Brad Bushman, “Narcissists aren’t afraid to tell you they’re narcissists” in this summary of his research here in “Business Insider”, August 6, 2014.

15. If Freud Worked Tech Support

Michael Brit, former professor of psychology, produces a podcast about psychology called “The Psych Files”. In this episode (Episode 224) he presents a ”humorous way to learn about the Freudian defense mechanisms (actually elaborated by Anna Freud) of Displacement, Denial, Sublimation, Reaction Formation, and Projection. A little dream analysis thrown in. Who knows? Maybe Freud would have been good at tech support” (runs 4 minutes, and 8 seconds).

16. Favorite Link Revisited: The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) develops and distributes teaching and advising materials and provides services to teachers of psychology at all levels on behalf of The Society for the Teaching of Psychology. Look here for everything from copies of syllabi, how to write letters of recommendation, how to host an undergraduate research conference, to ethical issues and ice breakers with everything else in between.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 11, July 2014

July 22, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,030 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This has been a good month for personality psychologists and teachers of personality psychology. News sources and social media have been buzzing with interesting findings directly related to personality psychology. Perhaps you’ve heard about the infamous Facebook study on emotional contagion or seen the Verizon ad illustrating the social factors which can undermine young girls’ achievements in science and math? Or, like, um, you know, how that annoying “Teenspeak” language is actually related to personality or how friends share similar genes? And, have you ever wondered about the attachment style of contestants on the TV reality shows “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette”? Yes, we have all this and more for you in this month’s newsletter.

This month we have added a new page on “Testing and Personnel Selection”. This includes many links that were previously included in the “Tests and Measurement” page, which, by the way, is now named “Personality Assessment” to better reflect the current state of the field.

Quick, grab your favorite chilled drink, browse the links below and place your bets on how “The Bachelorette” will end next Monday, secure in your knowledge of personality!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at http://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Virtuous Cycles: Night Owls and Early Birds

New research published in “Psychological Science” and summarized here by Wray Herbert suggests that there is an interaction between cognitive depletion and circadian fluctuations in tiredness. That is, people are more likely to cheat when they experience low energy, i.e., a dip in their biological clock. This suggests that early birds are likely to make bad choices later in the day and nights owls earlier in the day.

3. Powerful Ad Shows What A Little Girl Hears When You Tell Her She’s Pretty

According to the National Science Foundation, 66% of 4th grades girls say they like math and science, yet women make up only 18% of engineering majors in college. This Verizon commercial illustrates the social cues which may discourage girls from math and science during their early childhood. Runs 1 minute and 3 seconds.

4. Resilience: Motorcyclist Thrown After Crash, Walks Away

“I can either land on my feet or my head right now” is what was going through the mind of 24 year old Michael Smith as he was hit by a car while riding his motorcycle through an intersection in Florida. Amazingly, he flips head-over-heels, lands on his feet, and walks away. Runs 51 seconds.

5. The Secret of Effective Motivation

Psychologists Amy Wrzesniewski and Barry Schwartz summarize their research of the internal or instrumental motives of Cadets at the United States West Point Military Academy: “Our study suggests that efforts should be made to structure activities so that instrumental consequences do not become motives. Helping people focus on the meaning and impact of their work, rather than on, say, the financial returns it will bring, may be the best way to improve not only the quality of their work but also — counterintuitive though it may seem — their financial success.” From, “The New York Times”, July 4, 2014.

6. The Conscientiousness of Kidspeak

The “like”s and “you know”s ubiquitous in the language of 12-14 year olds are not, as parents bemoan, due to “sloppy indifference” but rather to “undue scrupulousness”. According to research by linguists at the University of Texas, youth high in Conscientiousness use these markers to signal that they have left out the details of what they are relating for the sake of economy. By Adam Gopnik for “The New Yorker”, July 20 2014.

7. Study Cracks How Brain Processes Emotions

From the website: “Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code [of neural activation] that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new study. “Despite how personal our feelings feel, the evidence suggests our brains use a standard code to speak the same emotional language,” one researcher concludes.” From “ScienceDaily”, July 9, 2014.

8. Research Ethics: The Facebook Experiment: Reaction From Psychologists

According to former psychology professor Michael Britt in his podcast “The Psych Files”: “You’ve probably heard about the controversy over the Facebook manipulation of user’s News Feeds and the (possible) effect this had on user’s emotions. In the latest episode of The Psych Files I summarize the study and my conclusions about it. Also included on the website is a (large) concept map that also summarizes the study, links to references and Facebook’s official response. Also included in the map and the episode: suggestions for students regarding how a proper informed consent form might have been written and presented to students.” Episode 22, July 1, 2014. Runs 33 minutes and 16 seconds.

9. Do Friends Have Similar Genomes?

According to research by James Fowler and Nicholas Christakis, “We are more genetically similar to our friends than we are to strangers. […] Looking at differences between nearly 2,000 people, recruited as part of a heart study in a small US town, they found that friends shared about 0.1% more DNA, on average, than strangers.” From “BBC News”, July 15, 2014.

10. 7 Ways You Can Easily Increase Your Willpower

Eric Barker of the “Barking Up The Wrong Tree” blog presents these 7 evidence-based ways of increasing your willpower in your daily life. July 20, 2014.

11. 11 Interview Questions Hiring Managers Ask To Test Your Personality

From the website: “In an effort to find new hires that are great cultural fits, employers are putting more emphasis on soft skills, or intangible qualities […] some qualities that are a good indication of success in a role include organizational and communication skills, great team player, strong leadership skills, an ability to think on your feet, drive, and initiative.” From “Business Insider”, June 11, 2014.

12. Here’s How Amazing Leaders Adapt to Crazy Situations

According to research by clinical psychologist Leslie Patch, personality profiling of executives at GE, McDonald’s, Merrill Lynch, and more, found that active coping is the greatest predictor of managerial success. From “Business Insider”, June 20, 2014.

13. New Social Media Study Investigates Relationships Among Facebook Use, Narcissism and Empathy

A study by Tracy Alloway and colleagues and summarized here for “ScienceDaily” suggests that a some features of Facebook, like profile photos are linked to narcissism, while others, like chatting are linked to empathy. According to Alloway, “Every narcissist needs a reflecting pool. Just as Narcissus gazed into the pool to admire his beauty, social networking sites, like Facebook, have become our modern-day pool.” July 3, 2014.

14. What Attachment Style is The Bachelorette’s Andi Dorfman?

Erica Djossa writing for the “Science of Relationships” blog explains her evidence for why this latest eligible lady from the reality TV series may have secure attachment, even though secure attachment doesn’t make for “juicy reality TV”.

15. How Your Mood Changes Your Personality

Research by Jan Querengässer and Sebastian Schindler found “When participants answered questions about their personality in a sad state, they scored “considerably” higher on trait neuroticism, and “moderately” lower on extraversion and agreeableness, as compared with when they completed the questionnaire in a neutral mood state”. From “BPS Research Digest”, July 17, 2014.

16. Self-Motivation: How “You Can Do it!” Beats “I Can Do It”

Research by Sanda Dolcos and Dolores Albarracín published in the “European Journal of Social Psychology” and summarized here for the “BPS Research Digest” suggests that second-person self-talk (e.g., “You can do it!”) is more effective than first-person self-talk. The researchers surmised that second-person talk may be effective because it “cues memories of receiving support and encouragement from others, especially in childhood”. July 9, 2014.

17. Favorite Link Revisited: Making Connections: Social Issues in the Psychology Classroom

Susan Goldstein of the University of Redlands established and maintains this site to: provide teachers of psychology with resources to assist them, both pedagogically and conceptually, in making connections between current social issues and specific topics across the psychology curriculum. The site features summaries of research findings, suggestions for videos, podcasts, and other multimedia resources, pedagogy-focused resources on relevant classroom activities and teaching strategies, and links to professional organizations and scholarly web resources with information on social issues.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 10, June 2014

June 19, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 3,012 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month, to celebrate the end of the school year and the start of summer we present a mixed-bag of very interesting links: laughter, dog treats, extroverts on Mars, healthy eating, Legos, Leo Tolstoy and much, much more. We hope that these will inspire you to think about personality and your teaching of personality psychology in new ways over the summer.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at http://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Dogs Like Treats, But Here’s What Really Gets Their Tails Wagging

It’s autonomy and competence, according to a study published in “Animal Cognition” and summarized here for “The Huffington Post”. According to the researchers, “The experimental animals in our study were excited not only by the expectation of a reward, but also about realizing that they themselves could control their access to the reward.” Posted June 16, 2014.

3. Extroverts Don’t Belong on Mars

A new study by Suzanne Bell and colleagues and summarized here for “The Atlantic”, finds that Extroverts, with their outgoing personalities, may not be suited for long, isolated voyages. Better go with the strong, silent, Introverts instead. Posted June 13, 2014.

4. The Role of Personality and Psychology in Healthy Eating

Can an understanding of personality and the five factors in particular help people to eat healthier? Patrick Fagan writing for “PsychCentral” thinks so. Posted June 12, 2014.

5. The Power of Our Personal Stories

Margarita Tartakovsky, writing for “PsychCentral” explains how revising our stories and our perceptions of problems can empower us. Posted June 15, 2014.

6. Leo Tolstoy on Finding Meaning in a Meaningless World

Maria Popova for “Brain Pickings” describes how Leo Tolstoy experienced depression and suicidal thoughts which led to “A Confession”, his meditation on the meaning of life. Posted June, 2014.

7. Lego To Launch Female Scientists Series After Online Campaign

According to this news report, “Women in science are taking one tiny, plastic step forward after Lego announced on Tuesday it will launch a series of female scientists and their lab tools. The science-themed project was selected as the latest Lego Ideas winner, and is set to hit shelves in August 2014. The series – notably devoid of pink – includes an astronomer with a telescope, a paleontologist with a dinosaur skeleton and a chemist in a lab.” The project idea was submitted by Dr Ellen Kooijman, a geochemist in Stockholm. In her project proposal, Kooijman wrote: “The motto of these [s]cientists is clear: explore the world and beyond!”. From “The Guardian”, June 4, 2014.

8. Self-Affirmation: A Simple Exercise That Actually Helps

According to research published in the “Annual Review of Psychology” and summarized here for “PsychCentral”, one effective way of affirming our values and strengths is to revise our narratives. Published June 2, 2014.

9. How To Get A Narcissist to Feel Empathy

Narcissists can feel empathy if they put themselves in another person’s shoes according to research by Erica Hepper and colleagues, published in the “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” and summarized here for “PsyBlog”, May 2014.

10. Laugh Often to Live Well

According to “Brain Blogger”: “Humor and mirth offer a multitude of preventive and healing effects and a new study is offering more evidence that laughter has quantifiable benefits for the brain”. Posted May 10, 2014.

11. Dog People vs. Cat People: Who’s More Outgoing? More Intelligent?

“Dog people and cat people really do have different personalities. People who said they were dog lovers in the study tended to be more lively — meaning they were more energetic and outgoing — and also tended to follow rules closely. Cat lovers, on the other hand, were more introverted, more open-minded and more sensitive than dog lovers. Cat people also tended to be non-conformists, preferring to be expedient rather than follow the rules.” This, according to research by Denise Guastello and colleagues and summarized here for “LiveScience”, May 27, 2014.

12. Hello Stranger

What happens when strangers are enticed to break the unwritten “no eye contact” rule? Positive emotions! Read about this research by Nicholas Epley and Juliana Schroeder in this piece from the “New York Times”, April 25, 2014.

13. Viktor Frankl on the Art of Presence As a Lifeboat in Turbulent Times and What Suffering Teaches Us About the Meaning of Life.

Maria Popova for “Brain Pickings” describes Frankl’s concept of presence which comes from “accepting [one’s] suffering as a task”. Posted March, 2014.

14. Thrill Seeker or Chill Seeker?

Ken Carter designed this online version of the Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking Scale. You can take the 40-item test and the site will tell you how you score overall and on the individual subscales of Boredom Susceptibility, Disinhibition, Experience Seeking, and Thrill & Adventure Seeking. Bonus: respondents’ results are combined to draw a map of sensation seeking scores around the world and within the United States.

15. Dr. Ken Carter

This web page of Clinical psychologist, speaker, and science writer Ken Carter contains many background resources on sensation seeking including audio and videos describing what sensation is and isn’t, links to a sensation seeking quiz, world heat maps of sensation seeing, press releases and more.

16. Resilience: Why It’s Vital and How to Enhance It

From the website: “You can’t always get what you want, but resilience helps you feel good anyways.”. From “Psychology Today”, June 6, 2013.

17. The Obstacle Is the Way

From the website: “the principle of changing poison into medicine explains that we can transform even the most horrific tragedy into the very thing we need to become happier than we currently are”. From “Psychology Today”, May 4, 2014.

18. Is There Hope for the Insecurely Attached?

Yes, according to Erica Djossa writing for “Science of Relationships”. In this piece she describes two categories of secure attachment: continuous secures and earned-secures. Earned-secures started out with an insecure attachment in infancy that developed into a secure attachment style later. This provides evidence for a secure buffering effect in which an insecure individual may come to show more secure attachment behaviors if they are in a relationship with a secure partner.

19. Here’s How Being Neurotic can Make you More Successful

Despite tendencies towards anxiety, depression, and mood swings, people who are high in Neuroticism tend to be strivers, whose proclivity for rumination may pay off in the right environment, like academia or knowledge-based work. From “Business Insider”, May 9, 2014.

20. Favorite Link Revisited: Electronic Texts Available on the Internet

Did you know that you can find electronic articles and writings free on the internet to supplement your personality course? Links to original writings by Sigmund Freud, Erik Erikson, Carl Jung, Kurt Lewin, Niccolò Machiavelli, Abraham Maslow, Henry Murray, Carl Rogers, B.F. Skinner and more including an e-textbook in Personality Psychology by George Boeree of Shippensburg University are available here at PersonalityPedagogy.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 9, May 2014

May 31, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,996 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

This month we are mourning the loss of Sandra Bem, feminist scholar and psychologist who died on May 20 just short of her 70th birthday. She will be remembered for her theoretical work and research on gender schema theory, the social construction of gender and sexuality, and her unconventional views on gender and child rearing.

Like many of our readers this month, we welcome the unofficial start of summer and the end of a semester (and school year!). We hope the summer is a time of rest and rejuvenation and we’ll be doing our best to keep the inspiration coming as you look ahead to teaching personality in a future semester.

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at http://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Love Makes You Strong: Romantic Relationships Help Neurotic People Stabilize Their Personality

Romantic relationships can help young adults who are high in Neuroticism to become less anxious, insecure, and easily annoyed according to research by Christine Finn and colleagues in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for “Science Daily” May 9, 2014.

3. Rice Theory Explains North-South China Cultural Differences

From the page: “A new cultural psychology study has found that psychological differences between the people of northern and southern China mirror the differences between community-oriented East Asia and the more individualistic Western world — and the differences seem to have come about because southern China has grown rice for thousands of years, whereas the north has grown wheat.” From “Science Daily”, May 8, 2014.

4. Does Facebook Affect Our Self-Esteem, Sense of Belonging?

From the page: “With 1.11 billion users per month on average, Facebook has become a global phenomenon offering continual and direct communication with friends and family. Research into how social media websites define us socially, and the influence that social media has on our personal welfare, suggests that a lack of social participation on Facebook leads to people feeling less meaningful.” From “Science Daily”, May 8, 2014.

5. Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient

Sam Kean for “Slate” magazine provides this retelling of the Gage tale, this time with the debunking of some myths and with additional information demonstrating that “The true story of Phineas Gage is much more fascinating that the mythical textbook accounts”. Includes new computer models of Gage’s injury and how it may have affected his brain functioning.

6. I Want You To Know That I’m Tyrion Lannister

The Forer (Barnum) Effect has found a new home: The Internet Quiz. Writer Maria Konnikova suggests that the reason why we are so drawn to these obviously false personality quizzes may have to do with our fascination with the self and our fundamental need to belong. From “The New Yorker”, May 1, 2014.

7. This is the Personality Trait That Most Often Predicts Success

Writing for “Inc.” magazine, Drake Baer describes the research which demonstrates that being high in Conscientiousness will help you succeed in many domains of life across the life span. From May, 2014.

8. Teaching Sexual Orientation

Psychologist David G. Myers suggests ways of teaching controversial topics like sexual orientation by focusing on evidence-based conclusions and how psychologists might test whether social policies affect the health and well-being of gay people. From the APS “Observer”, 27(5), May/June, 2014.

9. Epigenetics 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Explaining Everything

Genetics researcher Cath Ennis wrote this primer for The Guardian newspaper explaining what epigenetics is and how it can help us understand human health and disease. Posted April 25, 2014.

10. Do we Get Nicer With Age?

Amy Kluber, for Newsy, reports on a study by Christopher Soto and colleagues which found that people who were happier at the start of the study become more emotionally stable, conscientious, agreeable and introverted as they matured over the course of the study demonstrating that personality changes with life events. Posted April 22, 2014. Runs 1 minute 34 seconds.

11. Cultivating Happiness Often Misunderstood

From the page: “The concept of maximizing happiness has been explored by researchers, who have found that pursuing concrete ‘giving’ goals rather than abstract ones leads to greater satisfaction. One path to happiness is through concrete, specific goals of benevolence — like making someone smile or increasing recycling — instead of following similar but more abstract goals — like making someone happy or saving the environment.” From “Science Daily”, April 15, 2014.

12. Outgoing Behavior Makes for Happier Humans: Across Cultures, Extroverts Have More Fun

From the page: “Happy is as happy does, apparently — for human beings all over the world. Not only does acting extroverted lead to more positive feelings across several cultures, but people also report more upbeat behavior when they feel free to be themselves.” From “Science Daily”, April 15, 2014.

13. Biological Evidence of Positive and Negative People in the World

From the page: “The ability to stay positive when times get tough — and, conversely, of being negative — may be hardwired in the brain, finds new research.” From “Science Daily”, April 2, 2014.

14. Computer Maps 21 Distinct Emotional Expressions — Even “Happily Disgusted”

From the page: “Researchers have found a way for computers to recognize 21 distinct facial expressions — even expressions for complex or seemingly contradictory emotions such as “happily disgusted” or “sadly angry.” The study more than triples the number of documented facial expressions that researchers can now use for cognitive analysis.” From “Science Daily”, March 31, 2014.

15. Favorite Link Revisited: The Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI)

According to the site: “The Bem Sex Role Inventory was developed in 1971 by Dr. Sandra Lipsitz Bem. It characterizes your personality as masculine, feminine, androgynous, or undifferentiated. The BSRI is based on gender stereotypes, so what it’s actually measuring is how well you fit into your traditional sex role. Thus, your score may say as much about how our cultural expectations have changed over the last 35 years as it does about your personality.” You can take the original 60-item scale and receive your scores automatically online here.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 8, April 2014

April 30, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,982 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

Where did this semester go? For the first two months many of us barely had a complete week without missing a class day and here it is, finals already! We’ll keep this month’s issue short, sweet and highly entertaining. But first, in honor of finals week at my school, a few thought questions for you: Is Vladimir Putin a Narcissist? How is psychological science like Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows? Can you use your French toast as a kind of Rorschach test? Read on to find out!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at http://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Self-Other Agreement in Personality judgements

Seth Kaplan, Alicia Stachowski and Jill Bradley-Geist describe a classroom activity in which students judge each other using the five factors. The exercise can be used to illustrate the five factors, personality testing, interpersonal judgement, and self-awareness, as well as serve as a lively ice breaker exercise.

3. Inspiring Short Video: What is it that you desire most?

This short video is actually an advertisement for a Thai Insurance Company. In it, a man is depicted going through his day where things keep going wrong and yet he cheerfully continues to help people around him: “What does he get in return for doing this every day? He gets nothing. He won’t be richer. He won’t appear on TV. Still anonymous. And not a bit more famous. What he does receive are emotions. He witness happiness. Reaches a deeper understanding. Feels the love. Receives what money can’t buy and a world made more beautiful.” Published on April 5, 2014. Runs 3 minutes, 5 seconds.

4. Guide Your Students to Become Better Research Consumers

In this article for the April 2014 APS “Observer” psychologist Beth Morling outlines four validities (external, internal, construct, statistical) which are easy to remember and can help students to more critically evaluate research.

5. The Deathly Hallows of Psychological Science

Personality psychologist Brent Roberts compares the proposed changes to improve psychological science — including the Open Science Framework, journal reporting practices, and new statistics — to the dilemma Harry Potter faces in the final book of the series “The Deathly Hallows”. The dilemma we face is whether to destroy the Horcrux by eliminating problematic practices or to continue in the path of least resistance by pursuing the Deathly Hallows. His vivid analogy and clear description of the problem make this a thought-provoking and challenging read for any psychological scientist. Posted March 2014.

6. Inside Social Modeling With Albert Bandura

The Association for Psychological Science presented this special edition of “Inside the Psychologist’s Studio” featuring an in-depth interview with Albert Bandura. Filmed August 26, 2013 at Stanford University, the video runs 46 minutes and 03 seconds.

7. Photos of Identical Twins As Grown-Ups Show How Fate Takes Its Course

Beijing-based photographer Gao Rongguo captured this series of photos of men and women — identical twins — over 50 years of age. These haunting images raise the question of how genetics and our experiences make us who we are. Posted March 2014.

8. IRBs and Research on Teaching and Learning (2014)

Ryan C. Martin, Regan A. R. Gurung, and Janie H. Wilson put together this resource for the Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP). This unit “addresses common questions researchers might have about seeking approval from Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) to conduct research on teaching and learning (often called the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; SoTL)”. It is available under the Ethics tab.

9. Vladimir Putin, Narcissist?

Writing for the “The Atlantic”, Joseph Burgo examines how the concept of narcissism might provide insight into the Russian leader. Published April 15, 2014.

10. 5 Surefire Signs Someone You Care About is A Narcissist

Writing for the “Huff Post” Sharon Greenthal describes these five signs: “Believing that you’re better than others; fantasizing about power, success and attractiveness; exaggerating your achievements or talents; expecting constant praise and admiration; and believing that you’re special and acting accordingly.” Published February 24, 2014.

11. French Toast Rorschach Test

This entertaining “test”  will help you to determine which type of French Toast you should order when you go to its sponsor, the restaurant chain Denny’s. The images are eerily reminiscent of actual Rorschach cards. A fun way to open a discussion on projective tests, test construction, validity and reliability, and more.

12. Myers & Dewall Talk Psych

“David Myers and Nathan DeWall enjoy connecting psychological science with everyday life. In Myers and DeWall Talk Psych they share exciting new findings, everyday applications, and observations on all things psychology.”

13. Study Reveals How Neurotic People View Action

According to new research by Molly E. Ireland, Justin Hepler,  Hong Li, and Dolores Albarracin published in the “Journal of Personality” and summarized here for “The Huffington Post” there is a relationship between Neuroticism and negative attitudes towards action and positive attitudes towards inaction. Posted April 27, 2014.

14. Favorite Link Revisited: A Flashcard Strategy to Help Students Prepare for Three Types of Multiple-Choice Questions Commonly Found on Introductory Psychology Tests (2013)

The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) presents this resource (click to expand the Introductory Psychology category) by Drew Appleby to provide students with a research-based study strategy designed to help them understand, prepare for, and take multiple-choice tests more successfully. The 32 slides that accompany the introductory article familiarize students with three types of cognitive processes their instructors will commonly ask them to use in their classes and then invite them to model the behavior of their instructors by creating flashcards. Their flashcards should contain verbatim definitions for retention questions, accurate paraphrases for comprehension questions, and realistic examples for application questions.


Personality Pedagogy Newsletter Volume 8, Number 7, March 2014

March 30, 2014

Hello and welcome to the eighty-sixth Personality Pedagogy newsletter highlighting what’s new at http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. For more about the links below and approximately 2,964 other interesting links related to personality, please visit: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu.

As you know, the month of March is women’s history month and the media has been filled with all kinds of articles on gender differences. We’ve got some of the most fascinating collection of links on gender and gender differences, from man-tissues to an all-girl robotics team to a special episode in which the MythBusters question whether there is any evidence for gender differences in throwing by investigating the insult “You throw like a girl”.

Also, this month, we have located a series of videos illustrating attachment in both infants and adults. All in all, this is one of our newsiest issues in a long time!

As ever, please pass this newsletter on to interested colleagues and invite them to sign up for future issues and to visit the home of Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu. Remember, you can view the current newsletter, comment on newsletters, re-read what you missed in previous newsletters, or search all newsletters by checking out our blog at http://personalitypedagogy.wordpress.com and you can even receive Personality Pedagogy newsletters via RSS feed as soon as they are posted, by clicking on the “RSS-posts” button on the bottom right.

Cheers,
Marianne

Marianne Miserandino
miserandino “at” arcadia “dot” edu

1. The Personality Pedagogy Monthly Newsletter

http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu

Sign up here to receive this newsletter delivered to your e-mail inbox once a month! We promise never to share your information with anybody else or to use it for any other purpose than Personality Pedagogy.

2. Myth Busters You Throw Like a Girl

The Myth Busters team from the Discovery Channel bring out the evidence and take on the insult “You throw like a girl”. See how they debunk this myth of gender differences in this video (runs 3 minutes 39 seconds).

3. I’m An Engineer, Not A Cheerleader.

When 17-year old Sara Sakowitz and her all-girl robotics team were mistaken for cheerleaders instead of competitors, she described her frustration and dismay at one more micro aggression against smart non gender-conforming girls in this astute and moving opinion piece for “The Washington Post”, February 26, 2014.

4. Digging Into The Roots of Gender Differences

New research published in “Animal Behaviour” and summarized by Barbara J. King for NPR suggest that “[D]ata on wild chimpanzees from [...] Tanzania, indicate that human sex differences in childhood are primarily the result of biological, evolutionary mechanisms.” Published March 21, 2014.

5. Google, Tell Me. Is My Son A Genius?

“MORE than a decade into the 21st century, we would like to think that American parents have similar standards and similar dreams for their sons and daughters. But my study of anonymous, aggregate data from Google searches suggests that contemporary American parents are far more likely to want their boys smart and their girls skinny.” So says commentator Seth Stephens-Davidowitz and he has the graphics and explanation to support this statement.

6.The Most Pointlessly Gendered Products

Plenty has been said on how gendered advertising is harmful by reinforcing ender stereotypes. But according to the “Feministing” website, gendered advertising has reached a new low. There are now tissues, bread, and eggs marketed to men and even pet shampoo marketed to the owners of male and female dogs. Is using gender to sell gender-irrelevant products taking things too far? These images ought to spark a lively discussion of stereotypes vs. true gender differences in personality. Published March 26, 2014.

7. The Hidden Messages in Children’s Books

“Adults often find surprising subtexts in children’s literature – but are they really there? Hephzibah Anderson delves into the world of Freud and fairy tales” in this piece for the BBC. Published March 19, 2014.

8. Psychoanalysis and Art

John Dodds built this site to support the psychology courses he teaches including a course on Psychoanalysis and Art and Psychoanalysis and Society. Includes syllabi, readings, visuals, and more, on Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Melanie Klein, and Object Relations.

9. Attachment Styles and Romantic Relationships

A description and illustration of the three patterns of adult attachment by Alex Sauciuc and Colin Ford with Professor Dana Kotter-Gruehn. Published April 10, 2013 (Runs 15 minutes, 12 seconds)

10. Attachment Styles in Adults

Actors portray interactions between a secure, anxious, and ambivalent woman and her boyfriend. Published December 1, 2012 (runs 4 minutes 19 seconds).

11. PsychAlive: Dr. Dan Siegel on Optimal Attachment in infants and adults

Published March 3, 2011. Runs 1 minute, 4 seconds.

12. PsychAlive: Dr. Dan Siegel on Avoidant Attachment in infants and adults

Published March 3, 2011. Runs 2 minutes, 3 seconds.

13. PsychAlive: Dr. Dan Siegel on Ambivalent Attachment in infants and adults

Published March 3, 2011. Runs 1 minute, 55 seconds.

14. PsychAlive: Dr. Dan Siegel on Disorganized Attachment in infants and adults

Published March 3, 2011. Runs 5 minutes, 29 seconds.

15. Does Teaching Kids to Get “Gritty” Help Them Get Ahead?

Summarizes the research by Angela Duckworth and describes how school are trying to teach students “grit” i.e., that persistence, determination and resilience are the keys to success in school and beyond. Tovia Smith visits a public school in Brooklyn and reports on how they have put Duckworth’s ideas into action. From NPR’s “Morning Edition”, March 17, 2014. Includes links to a a Grit scale and the mindset test of Carol Dweck. Part 1 Runs 7 minutes, 48 seconds; Part 2 runs 7 minutes, 43 seconds.

16. Grit Scale

According to psychologist Angela Duckworth, “Grit is the tendency to sustain interest in and effort toward very long-term goals”. The idea is that determination, persistence, and resilience are the keys to success. Take this short quiz and see how much grit you have compared to others.

17. Mindset Scale

When it comes to your own level of intelligence and other basic qualities, do you have more of a fixed mindset or more of a growth mindset? Take this 16-item quiz to find out your attitude toward basic abilities.

18. Why Sleep is Important and What Happens When You Don’t Get Enough

Summarizes research on sleep and sleep disorders and explains why it is so important that we get our rest. Published by the American Psychological Association March 30, 2014.

19. To Keep Teenagers Alert, School Let Them Sleep In

“The sputtering, nearly 20-year movement to start high schools later has recently gained momentum in communities like this one, as hundreds of schools in dozens of districts across the country have bowed to the accumulating research on the adolescent body clock.” according to this story in the “New York Times” published March 13, 2014.

20. Favorite Link Revisited: Psychological Differences Between the Sexes: A time capsule from 1964

This 1964 film claims that innate psychological and emotional differences between the sexes leads to problems in relationships and strives to educate young people to avoid these problems. But according to psychological research in the 50 years or more since this film was produced, are these truly sex differences or merely stereotypes? This obviously dated film is sure to spark discussion on these and related issues.

 

 

 


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